Four Seasons New Orleans Opening July 2021

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Want to receive extra benefits for your stay at the Four Seasons New Orleans, including a space available room upgrade, complimentary breakfast, a hotel credit, and more? Contact [email protected]. He may even be able to help if you already have a stay booked.


The Big Easy will soon be getting a new luxury hotel, which will probably be the best major chain hotel in the city. While it’s not bookable with points, it’s at least worth being aware of, as rates are fairly reasonable (at least as of now).

Basics of the new Four Seasons New Orleans

The Four Seasons New Orleans is now accepting reservations for stays as of July 21, 2021. The Four Seasons will feature 341 rooms and 92 condos. It will be located in a historic 33-story tower — specifically in the former International Trade Mart building, which used to be known as the World Trade Center New Orleans.

The hotel will be located on Canal Street, on the banks of the Mississippi River. To one side of the hotel is the French Quarter, while to the other side is the Warehouse District.

Four Seasons New Orleans exterior
Four Seasons New Orleans on the banks of the Mississippi River

While the exterior of the hotel is classic, the interior looks modern and gorgeous, as you’d expect from a new Four Seasons. The rooms here range in size from 438 square feet for a standard accommodation, all the way to 2,439 square feet for the presidential suite.

Four Seasons New Orleans guest room

The Four Seasons New Orleans will feature two restaurants, a bar, a spa, a gym, a fifth floor rooftop pool, and a two-level rooftop observation deck.

Four Seasons New Orleans pool
Four Seasons New Orleans bar

Four Seasons New Orleans rates & how to book

With the Four Seasons New Orleans now accepting reservations, what are rates like? The lowest rate I’m seeing is $300 per night around opening time, and rates go up from there. As you’d expect, rates differ seasonally, based on the day of the week, and based on what’s going on in town.

While this will probably be New Orleans’ most expensive hotel, this is among the cheapest Four Seasons city properties in the United States, at least based on current pricing.

If you’re going to book this hotel (or any Four Seasons), you absolutely should book through a travel advisor who is affiliated with Four Seasons Preferred Partner. With this program, eligible travel advisors can add value to your stay without it costing you extra. They can add perks like complimentary breakfast (including via in-room dining), a hotel credit, an upgrade subject to availability, and more.

Best of all, Four Seasons Preferred Partner can generally be combined with any rates you’ll find directly with Four Seasons. For what it’s worth, the upgrades through this program are also prioritized over upgrades through other programs, so you’ll want to use Preferred Partner over a program like Virtuoso or Amex Fine Hotels & Resorts. Ford is always happy to help with Preferred Partner bookings, and can be reached at [email protected]

Rates at the Four Seasons New Orleans are reasonable

Why the Four Seasons New Orleans is a cool addition

I visited New Orleans earlier this year for the first time as an adult, and had an interesting experience. I loved the food, the culture, and the history. I didn’t personally love the “partying” side of New Orleans, though, but that’s more a personal preference than anything. That part of New Orleans felt to me more like Las Vegas, and I found it to be overwhelming.

New Orleans has great food (in moderation)

I stayed at the Hyatt Centric New Orleans French Quarter because I’m loyal to World of Hyatt, though admittedly that’s far from a luxury hotel. There’s also a Ritz-Carlton (which just looks okay), as well as a variety of independent luxury hotels, which are probably the best options.

I kind of like the idea of the Four Seasons. It’s not right in the heart of the French Quarter, so at least inside it might feel like a peaceful haven, even though it’s right by the French Quarter. And I kind of like that it’s in a high-rise not on Bourbon Street, because otherwise sleeping in New Orleans can be a challenge based on all the noise.

Bottom line

The Four Seasons New Orleans will be opening in July 2021, and should be New Orleans’ most luxurious chain hotel. With 341 rooms, it’s not exactly a boutique hotel, but in my experience Four Seasons does a better job than any other brand when it comes to maintaining high standards even at big hotels.

What do you make of the new Four Seasons New Orleans?

Conversations (31)
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  1. sharon

    I don't think this property is the right fit for New Orleans. It has simply too many rooms for too small a market.

    Virtually no business travel to New Orleans and its the party crowd type of city.

    New Money is going to Austin and Nashville now in days.

    1. Frank

      Lol never heard of the convention center there eh

    2. Boudreaux

      Yea it was where the casino is. There tore it down to build the casino in its foot print.

    3. Nola

      No they did not tear down the casino. It’s in the old World Trade Center. The casino is still there!

  2. AW

    Being on Canal, even at the end of Canal, is a drawback. It's amazingly noisy at night, and I suspect that this hotel, right next to the casino, will be also. Anyplace on Poydras or west of there is much preferable.

    1. Carl

      Plus there are the heavy rail lines that pass right behind. Can hear those horns many blocks away.

  3. ConcordeBoy

    "virtually no business travel to New Orleans" is an absurd statement; I say as someone who worked in the travel sector there for years.

    Like the Ritz, Windsor Court, and several other high-end properties in the area, they'll have absolutely no trouble filling this, if travel patterns return to anything resembling previous.

  4. MB

    It would be great if it were a peaceful haven, but Canal Street is noisy throughout the night. Stayed at the Waldorf just off Canal awhile back (and at the Le Meridien before that), there was considerable road noise from both even on high floors. Airbnbs in quieter neighborhoods are much more enjoyable!

  5. khatl

    When you say the exterior is "classic", in what sense? That it's a classic from the 50's or 60's that went out of fashion years back?

    Just the look of the exterior puts me off staying there.

    1. Ken

      I believe what he means is that it's an older building. This hotel isn't a new build, but a conversion of a building that was built many decades ago.

    2. Gil

      It's the former international trade mart building having been there for several decades. Smart and innovative to convert into a hotel.

  6. Alonzo

    Four Seasons Baltimore used to be my favorite under the radar Four Seasons for decent rates. Maybe this will be my next :)

    1. Luke

      I dont think FS Baltimore is so "reasonable" nowadays with 500-600+ cash rates regularly. Think the only way to get lower rates nowadays is outside the US, I recall Four Seasons Singapore where I stayed 2 years ago was at a more down to earth 200-250 a night rates.

  7. Motion to Dismiss

    Did you consider the Monteleone or the Roosevelt for your previous stay? Those are the city’s most iconic and current best hotels.

  8. pstm91

    This is a very large hotel for the city. I do agree with that, but it will be far and away the best option. Windsor Court and the RC are the other two best, but they need work. Suites at the RC are nice but wouldn't book anything below that tier. The location of this hotel is a little out of of the way, but it's a short walk.
    I don't agree with the...

    This is a very large hotel for the city. I do agree with that, but it will be far and away the best option. Windsor Court and the RC are the other two best, but they need work. Suites at the RC are nice but wouldn't book anything below that tier. The location of this hotel is a little out of of the way, but it's a short walk.
    I don't agree with the NOLA-LV comparison though. New Orleans has much more culture and you can get away from the party scene quite easily. You also have fantastic seafood on top of all the "heavy" stuff. It's such a great foody city. The key is having a local to take you around - true for anywhere but there in particular, they can show you the truly great/under the radar places to eat and drink.

  9. pstm91

    Sidenote, Ben - these new comments are very hard to follow along. Also, I understand your need for ads, but having them within the comment thread is BRUTAL and adds to why they are so hard to follow along. I know this update is a work in progress, but that would be a good place to start.

    1. SErickson

      I tend to agree on this...That and having to "load" more comments and have it pop up on the side rather than in-line is .... unique?

  10. Latonia

    Super excited about this new addition to New Orleans! I’m optimistic that given the diverse amount of travelers there- pro sports, college major events, Pharma, Med, Tech & private social events (weddings), the hotel should fair well and keep there competitors from getting too comfortable! I book most of my corporate events @ The Ritz… but I l’m willing to give them a go!

  11. CJS

    Lucky - it's very obvious that you don't know NOLA too well. As already pointed out by others, there is the Ritz-Carlton, the Windsor Court, the Roosevelt, the Monteleone, etc., etc. Based on your previous trip review for the ONE time you've been to NOLA - you barely scratched the surface and the places you went and things you did (or lack of things you did not do) are not at all indicative of NOLA....

    Lucky - it's very obvious that you don't know NOLA too well. As already pointed out by others, there is the Ritz-Carlton, the Windsor Court, the Roosevelt, the Monteleone, etc., etc. Based on your previous trip review for the ONE time you've been to NOLA - you barely scratched the surface and the places you went and things you did (or lack of things you did not do) are not at all indicative of NOLA. A one-time visitor does not an expert make!!

    Also, agree with another reader that I do not like the format of this new comment section - hard to follow and the ads are a nightmare.

    1. Boudreaux

      I agree. Obviously this writer has never been in the city (pre-covid B.S.) for any of its monumental events that completely book up EVERY room in the city. Aside from Mardi Gras, French quarter festival, Jazz fest, the "eventful" Southern classic, the occasional super bowl & MANY other events.

  12. Santos Dominguez

    Clearly, the author is extremely unfamiliar with New Orleans. Theres a wealth of excellent high end hotels, most of them being boutique hotels with personality and originality. Also, he couldn't do more than a weekend because he probably spent his time on Bourbon St. The most clichèd and mainstream thing about NOLA. The author comes across as not curious, and having a mainstream big box mentality.

  13. Xanadu

    Guests on lower levels are going to LOVE the Public Belt railway that has to blow its horn at all the crossings. I wish them luck though, more room availability in the city is always a great thing.

  14. Louis

    One,day or weekend you dont know this city.One of the richest cultures in the United States.

  15. Louis

    You can't describe New Orleans in a weekend.

  16. Mc235

    Where on earth did you get your weak info??? you left sooooo much out!!! This building stands as both historic and iconic! Its architect was the same as Radio City Music Hall! Once had a world famous revolving rooftop lounge! Its so much more than your best attempt at a description! Also the opening is set to be a soft opening and rates will reflect that not all offerings will be operational at the time...

    Where on earth did you get your weak info??? you left sooooo much out!!! This building stands as both historic and iconic! Its architect was the same as Radio City Music Hall! Once had a world famous revolving rooftop lounge! Its so much more than your best attempt at a description! Also the opening is set to be a soft opening and rates will reflect that not all offerings will be operational at the time of opening. You also completely left out the residential condos which comprise nearly half of the building!!!

  17. SK

    Wow, first may I say that I’m very dissatisfied with the writer of this article. It’s negativity about the city, neighborhoods, food(sickening rich), noise level and compared our historical French & Spanish influences to Las Vegas! The weekend was more than enough for the writer.
    New Orleans is steeped in wonderful history of the most interesting people. The Battle of Chalmette, Jean Lafitte, pirates, the French Quarter, architecture and so much more if you...

    Wow, first may I say that I’m very dissatisfied with the writer of this article. It’s negativity about the city, neighborhoods, food(sickening rich), noise level and compared our historical French & Spanish influences to Las Vegas! The weekend was more than enough for the writer.
    New Orleans is steeped in wonderful history of the most interesting people. The Battle of Chalmette, Jean Lafitte, pirates, the French Quarter, architecture and so much more if you had just done your research. So sorry you neglected the culture as you really missed out. Our restaurants, chefs and food are world renowned, if it’s avacado toast you want it can be had anywhere.
    I hope the extremely luxurious Four Seasons Hotel does very well. It appears to be quite lovely.

  18. Sue

    Wow, first may I say that I’m very dissatisfied with the writer of this article. It’s negativity about the city, neighborhoods, food(sickening rich), noise level and compared our historical French & Spanish influences to Las Vegas! The weekend was more than enough for the writer.
    New Orleans is steeped in wonderful history of the most interesting people. The Battle of Chalmette, Jean Lafitte, pirates, the French Quarter, architecture and so much more if you...

    Wow, first may I say that I’m very dissatisfied with the writer of this article. It’s negativity about the city, neighborhoods, food(sickening rich), noise level and compared our historical French & Spanish influences to Las Vegas! The weekend was more than enough for the writer.
    New Orleans is steeped in wonderful history of the most interesting people. The Battle of Chalmette, Jean Lafitte, pirates, the French Quarter, architecture and so much more if you had just done your research. So sorry you neglected the culture as you really missed out. Our restaurants, chefs and food are world renowned, if it’s avacado toast you want it can be had anywhere.
    Somehow the people that picked the writer of this article completely missed the opportunity to explore!

    I hope the extremely luxurious Four Seasons Hotel does very well. It appears to be quite lovely.

  19. Jackson

    Horribly written article, lots of business travel to New Orleans.

  20. Jackson

    These comments are so hard to follow

  21. NOLA_Innkeeper

    Not only did the author of this article not do his homework while in the Crescent City, it appears that many of the folks commenting on the potential noise on Canal Street have never been inside of this lovely, Modernist building, which was the very first skyscraper built in the city in the late 1960s.

    According to an article by the Tulane School of Architecture, the "building was completed in 1967 to serve as...

    Not only did the author of this article not do his homework while in the Crescent City, it appears that many of the folks commenting on the potential noise on Canal Street have never been inside of this lovely, Modernist building, which was the very first skyscraper built in the city in the late 1960s.

    According to an article by the Tulane School of Architecture, the "building was completed in 1967 to serve as a highly visible symbol of the city’s longtime role as a global port and to encourage growth of the port in the modern era. In addition to its strategic location near the Mississippi River at the foot of Canal Street, which is the city’s historic commercial heart, the building’s cruciform shape corresponds to the four cardinal points as an embodiment of the port’s international importance. It was designed by renowned architect Edward Durell Stone and is considered a mature example of his work in the New Formalism style."

    The building itself is iconic and is a historical landmark of the city. For decades, New Orleans and visitors alike would gather at the "Top of the Mart", a revolving lounge on the building's thirty-third floor, for cocktails, music, business luncheons and various other celebrations. I myself enjoyed dinner, libations, music and a spectacular view of city-wide fireworks on three separate New Years Eve nights. There was something magical and surreal about witnessing fireworks over Metairie, Lakeview, New Orleans East, and the Westbank as the night progressed, until the rotation of the lounge was halted at five minutes before midnight so that the best table in the house could view grand finale over the Mississippi River in its entirety. And oh, I forgot to mention ... not one single boom, pop, crackle or fizzle was heard. Yes, the building is soundproof! So much for hearing passing trains, shouting drunks, or any of the Carnival-like atmosphere from the street below.

    And yes, the others who have commented that the author didn't even scratch the surface of what New Orleans is all about are absolutely correct. Had he left Bourbon Street for at least a minute or two, he would have discovered a city that has something to offer to everyone, and to keep them coming back over and over, time after time.

  22. Nola

    The Crime rate has been exploding there and the French Quarter is not like it used to be. Gone to the dumps. Restaurants with reservations are still good but the Mayor needs to clean up the city more for tourism

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pstm91

Sidenote, Ben - these new comments are very hard to follow along. Also, I understand your need for ads, but having them within the comment thread is BRUTAL and adds to why they are so hard to follow along. I know this update is a work in progress, but that would be a good place to start.

ConcordeBoy

"virtually no business travel to New Orleans" is an absurd statement; I say as someone who worked in the travel sector there for years. Like the Ritz, Windsor Court, and several other high-end properties in the area, they'll have absolutely no trouble filling this, if travel patterns return to anything resembling previous.

Frank

Lol never heard of the convention center there eh

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