Four Seasons Yachts: Prices, How To Book, Itineraries, Ship Details

Four Seasons Yachts: Prices, How To Book, Itineraries, Ship Details

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Four Seasons Yachts journeys are only bookable by invitation or through select Four Seasons travel advisors. Ford and his team are happy to help with requests, and can be reached at [email protected]. They can answer any questions, and put a journey on hold for you ASAP.

Four Seasons is known for its luxury hotels, though soon the brand will be getting into the cruising industry, with the introduction of Four Seasons Yachts. Four Seasons is taking a unique approach toward its journeys, because the whole concept almost seems designed for people who wouldn’t necessarily take cruises.

There’s now a major update, as Four Seasons Yachts has started accepting reservations. I’ll go over all the information in detail below, but just to cover some of the very basics:

  • Four Seasons Yachts will offer an all-suite experience with just 95 accommodations on the ship, offering one of the most exclusive cruising experiences to date
  • Four Seasons Yachts is now selling cruises as of January 2026, though they’re only bookable by invitation, and through select top Four Seasons travel advisors (that’s right, you can’t book directly, or through your typical cruise agent)
  • Four Seasons Yachts will initially sail the Caribbean and Mediterranean, offering five to 14 night cruises
  • Four Seasons Yachts rates start at roughly $3,000 per suite per night, including breakfast, non-alcoholic drinks, light snacks, and gratuities; lunch, dinner, and alcohol, aren’t included

With the above out of the way, let’s take a closer look at the details.

What is the Four Seasons Yachts ship like?

Four Seasons Yachts is the name of Four Seasons’ new cruising venture, which is a partnership between the hotel group and Marc-Henry Cruise Holdings Ltd. The plan is to eventually offer multiple vessels, with the first expected to be delivered in late 2025, and the second expected to be delivered in late 2026.

The ships are being produced by Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri, with interiors by Tillberg of Sweden, and creative direction by Prosper Assouline. Each vessel has an estimated cost of around €400 million.

Four Seasons Yacht rendering

While I’ll talk more about the accommodations below, let me first cover some of the basics of the ship:

  • The vessel will be 207 meters (679 feet) long and 27 meters (89 feet) wide, and will feature 14 decks
  • The vessel will have just 95 accommodations, in an all-suite layout
  • The ship will feature 11 different restaurants and lounges, to give guests a variety of options
  • The ship will feature an onboard transverse marina, allowing guests easy access to water toys that you’d traditionally only find on privately owned yachts; this will also offer tiered lounging decks
  • The aft deck will boast a 20 meter (66 feet) salt water pool, making it one of the largest at sea; this can quickly be emptied and the floor can be raised, and converted into a multi-function area
  • The ship will offer nearly 50% more living space per guest than what’s currently available in the industry, and will have a staff to guest ratio of roughly 1:1
  • As a relatively small and intimate “cruise ship,” Four Seasons Yachts will, when possible, anchor and then tender guests into the port, as opposed to using a cruise terminal

I wanted to briefly put into context just how spacious this ship it. For example, Ritz-Carlton Yacht Collection is another new luxury cruise line associated with a hotel group. That ship is 190 meters with 149 rooms, while this one will be 207 meters with 95 rooms, which is a huge difference.

Four Seasons Yacht pool deck rendering
Four Seasons Yacht marina rendering
Four Seasons Yacht hallway rendering

What are suites like on Four Seasons Yachts?

As mentioned above, Four Seasons Yachts will feature just 95 accommodations, in an all-suite layout. The cabin layout here completely redefines what you’d ordinarily expect to find on a cruise ship, from the size of the entry level accommodations, to the absurdly over-the-top specialty suites. You can view all the details of the suites at this link.

First let’s cover the four suite categories of which there are multiple available, which make up 88 of the 95 suites onboard (all the square footage amounts include indoor and outdoor space):

  • There will be 42 Seaview Suites, offering 537 to 613 square feet, and featuring a spacious bedroom with a double-vanity marble bathroom and a private terrace; this can accommodate two adults and one infant
  • There will be 15 Superior Seaview Suites, offering 807 to 893 square feet, and featuring a bedroom with a large sitting area, a double-vanity bathroom with a soaking tub and walk-in shower, and a large outdoor terrace; this can accommodate two adults and one infant or one child
  • There will be 15 Ocean Suites, offering 893 to 1,011 square feet, and featuring a larger bedroom, a separate living room, floor-to-ceiling windows, and a private terrace; this can accommodate three adults, or two adults and two children
  • There will be 16 Grand Ocean Suites, offering 1,012 to 1,140 square feet in an “L-shape,” with a large living room, bedroom, and terrace; this can accommodate three adults, or two adults and two children
Four Seasons Yacht Seaview Suite rendering

Beyond that, there are seven specialty suites, with the most impressive being the Funnel Suite, which is a four level suite that covers a total of 9,975 square feet. This has everything from a splash pool, to a private elevator, to an outdoor gym, to a private kitchen.

Four Seasons Yacht Funnel Suite rendering

How expensive are Four Seasons Yachts journeys?

Obviously Four Seasons Yachts is going after the high-end of the cruise market, and the company is largely targeting people who might otherwise consider chartering a private yacht.

Nonetheless, pricing is actually more attractive than most people had assumed. The first thing to understand is that pricing is per suite, rather than per guest. Most cruise lines have a per person cost based on double occupancy, while in the case of Four Seasons Yachts, you’re simply paying for the suite, regardless of how many people are in them (up to the occupancy limit).

Four Seasons Yachts journeys start at roughly $3,000 per suite per day. The exact cost varies by journey, but you’ll pretty regularly find entry level pricing within that range. Furthermore, as you’d expect, the premium suites can go for a lot more, with the Funnel Suite regularly costing $200K+ per journey.

When the concept of Four Seasons Yachts was first announced, many people assumed a cruise would cost six figures for any kind of suite. So I think many people will be pleasantly surprised by the pricing. Given the limited inventory, I think Four Seasons Yachts will book out in no time.

What’s included with Four Seasons Yachts journeys?

Four Seasons Yachts is taking a different approach than other cruise lines when it comes to inclusions. When some people think of a cruise, the thought of a floating all-you-can-eat buffet might come to mind. Four Seasons is going exactly the opposite direction. With Four Seasons Yachts:

  • All rates include daily breakfast, a selection of non-alcoholic drinks, some light snacks throughout the day, and gratuities
  • Lunch, dinner, and alcoholic beverages, will be available at an additional cost
  • All meals and beverages for children 12 years of age and under are included in the fare

On the surface, it might seem a little strange for what might just be the world’s most luxurious cruise line also having among the most a la carte pricing. But when you think about it, it largely makes sense:

  • Four Seasons wants to create a resort experience at sea; just as Four Seasons doesn’t have any all-inclusive resorts on land, it also doesn’t have it at sea
  • I would think Four Seasons assumes that many guests will specifically want to dine off the ship in many of the destinations that are served (like in the Mediterranean), so including all meals is kind of silly

Obviously this is a tradeoff. Everyone would rather have something included than not. But at the same time, I think the cruise costs are lower than many expected, but with an a la carte component.

Four Seasons Yacht exterior rendering

How do you book Four Seasons Yachts cruises?

Four Seasons Yachts cruises aren’t bookable directly online, or even directly through Four Seasons. For the foreseeable future, they’ll only be bookable by invitation, or through a select number of Four Seasons’ top travel advisors. There’s no markup when booking through a travel advisor, and they can help you sort through all the details.

Ford and his team are happy to help with Four Seasons Yachts journeys, and can be reached at [email protected].

So, what are the logistics of booking like? For most suite types, your itinerary can be placed on a 24-hour hold. Then a 25% deposit will be required to lock in your booking, with the balance due 150 days before the sailing. Up until that point, you generally have the ability to cancel, minus an administrative fee. You’ll want to check with an eligible travel advisor to learn the exact terms, as they do vary.

I certainly could be wrong, but I would guess that these journeys will sell out really quickly, given the amount of interest surrounding Four Seasons’ entry into the cruise world, plus how small the ship is, plus how few journeys are currently for sale.

Four Seasons Yacht exterior rendering

Where do Four Seasons Yachts itineraries go?

Four Seasons Yachts is expected to sale in the Caribbean in winter, and in the Mediterranean in summer. As of now, journeys have gone on sale for sailings departing anywhere from January 25 through June 5, 2026. While the journeys are anywhere from five to 12 nights, you’ll notice that the itineraries aren’t the same week-to-week, which is intended so that people can take longer journeys while visiting different destinations.

Journeys will start in the Caribbean, with the following itineraries (all in 2026):

  • Antigua & St. Lucia, Lesser Antilles (seven nights, starting at $19,900); January 25 through February 1, February 15 through February 22
  • Curaçao & Martinique, Lesser Antilles (seven nights, starting at $19,900); February 1 through February 8, February 22 through March 1
  • Nevis & the Grenadines, Lesser Antilles (seven nights, starting at $19,900); February 8 through February 15, March 1 through March 8

Then the ship will be moving to the Mediterranean, with the following itineraries (all in 2026):

  • Madeira & Gibraltar, Grand Atlantic (12 nights, starting at $22,900); March 8 through March 20
  • Saint-Tropez & Trapani, Grand Mediterranean (nine nights, starting at $28,500); March 20 through March 29
  • Mykonos & Marmaris, Grand Mediterranean (seven nights, starting at $23,500); March 29 through April 5, 2024
  • Santorini & Yalikavak, Greek Isles (seven nights, starting at $23,500); April 5 through April 12, April 19 through April 26, May 3 through May 10, May 17 through May 24
  • Göcek & Kos, Greek Isles (seven nights, starting at $23,500); April 12 through April 19, April 26 through May 3, May 10 through May 17, May 24 through May 31
  • Santorini & Mykonos, Greek Isles (five nights, starting at $19,000); May 31 through June 5
  • Monemvasia & Tivat, Ionian & Dalmatian Coast (nine nights, starting at $33,500); June 5 through June 14

You can find more details about the Caribbean journeys, the Mediterranean journeys, and the Greek journeys.

Four Seasons Yacht rendering

Bottom line

Four Seasons is getting into the luxury cruise business, with the introduction of Four Seasons Yachts. The inaugural journeys are now on sale for sailings as of early 2026. It’s exciting to see Four Seasons get into the cruising business — the brand is known for its great hotels, so hopefully it can deliver the same experience at sea.

If you’re interested in booking a Four Seasons Yachts experience, I’d recommend doing so ASAP, as I know demand is huge.

What do you make of Four Seasons Yachts?

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  1. iamhere Guest

    The relationship with Four Seasons and the cruise line is not discussed.

  2. Stuart F Guest

    Larry Pimentel, Philip Levine exit joint owner/operator of Four Seasons Yachts

    When launched, what gave Four Seasons Yachts credibility as being a successful cruise line start-up, was not its owner, Marc-Henry Cruise Holdings (or its affiliation with the Four Seasons brand) but its leadership, namely highly respected travel and cruise line veteran Larry Pimentel, whom I've known since he headed up Seabourn Cruises, at its launch as an independent company headquartered in San Francisco (before...

    Larry Pimentel, Philip Levine exit joint owner/operator of Four Seasons Yachts

    When launched, what gave Four Seasons Yachts credibility as being a successful cruise line start-up, was not its owner, Marc-Henry Cruise Holdings (or its affiliation with the Four Seasons brand) but its leadership, namely highly respected travel and cruise line veteran Larry Pimentel, whom I've known since he headed up Seabourn Cruises, at its launch as an independent company headquartered in San Francisco (before its sale to Carnival Corp).

    However in February Four Seasons Yachts Co-Founder, President and Chief Executive Larry Pimentel, who is also a Board Member of Virtuoso, along with Board Member, PhilipLevine, abruptly resigned. This leaves Nadim Ashi, the other co-founder of Marc-Henry Cruise Holdings as being in charge. Marc-Henry Cruise Holdings was established by Ashi, whose Fort Partners is a Miami-based, privately held real estate and hospitality development firm that owns the Four Seasons Hotel at The Surf Club, Surfside, and Levine, former Miami Beach mayor and a cruise industry veteran who founded Onboard Media and Royal Media Partners. Marc and Henry are the names of their sons. He has no cruise line experience, no less a challenging start-up.

    Therefore I would advise extreme caution in booking Four Seasons Yachts in advance of its launch and prudence calls for waiting until they have some experience, assuming the launch date holds.

  3. Joe Guest

    Will be so intrigued to see how this pans out. As others have mentioned - I'm not sure on the cost/benefit trade off vs chartering. Especially at the higher end. Wouldn't you rather have a smaller vessel all to yourself than share the FS yacht in the 'funnel suite'?

  4. Paul Guest

    What is the suite pricing for the crossing from Med to Carrib and vice versa?

  5. Sr Guest

    If you’re feeling spendy enough you can purchase the funnel suite. Only $400,000 for a week long trip to hidden gems like Santorini and mykonos. If you’re lucky enough and your hooker behaves to the staff, you can get 111’d in the FS system. Then you get free breakfast and butt munching at all four seasons properties forever and ever!!

  6. Sr Guest

    This is not looking like a yacht for the discerning traveler. Four seasons returning to its roots of new money slobs and their hookers. Nothing like a grand entrance into Mykonos with your favorite prostitute like coming off the big four seasons super ship.

  7. SR Guest

    I’m surprised by the destinations. I thought it would be all off the beaten path like a lot of what Ponant does. But the Greece routing looks like what every other luxury cruise offers. Santorini? Ground breaking. Ios? What are the FS customers going to do there, take shots with 18 year old Australian boys? Get it together four seasons, I know you’re all the way in Toronto but let’s do some research first

  8. Anon Guest

    This is just a small, very expensive cruise ship, not a "yacht." For the prices they're charging, one could actually charter an actual sailing or motor yacht with a group of friends and have an intimate yacht experience. A crewed 4-cabin catamaran in Croatia in the summer is around $13,000 for a week (sleeps up to 8) from Moorings. Way more fun boat experience in my book. Fancier motor yachts can be had starting around...

    This is just a small, very expensive cruise ship, not a "yacht." For the prices they're charging, one could actually charter an actual sailing or motor yacht with a group of friends and have an intimate yacht experience. A crewed 4-cabin catamaran in Croatia in the summer is around $13,000 for a week (sleeps up to 8) from Moorings. Way more fun boat experience in my book. Fancier motor yachts can be had starting around $25k per week for 8 people, still a fraction of the price of the Four Seasons.

    1. Luis Guest

      Yes that's the route I would choose as well but you can't compare a 4 cabin catamaran to a 600ft mega yacht. The level of luxury and space, while shared with strangers is like comparing a 5 star resort with a budget airbnb. Just because they both travel on the water does not make them comparable.

    2. D3kingg Guest

      More like 100K a week.

    3. Mick Guest

      We rented a catamaran with skipper and 4 bedrooms for five of us in Croatia in 2022 summer. It was a brilliant experience. No unpacking. Lots of tiny islands and inlets. Hvar for a day trip (we didn’t want long there but you can stay as long as you like).

      Snorkeling. Exploring caves. So good. Meals onshore were dirt cheap. We packed groceries for breakfast and snacks.

      Charter cost was about $13k

  9. Maxell Azaria Guest

    Half the fun of cruising is the unlimited free food and putting away your wallet for the duration of the trip.
    This a la carte system makes no sense to me, perhaps it wont bother the weatlhier patrons.

  10. Eskimo Guest

    I'll bet that they would eventually be all inclusive.

    Excuse of land resort are not all inclusive and are not targeting cruisers is a joke. I hope their management isn't thinking like this.

    This is as dunnb as saying airlines serve caviar in First Class is to target people who normally eats caviar but not targeting people who normally flies First Class.

    They are not reinventing the industry, they are just trying to redistribute the luxury segment.

  11. Davw Guest

    As someone who isn't a foodie type and doesn't drink much, a la carte pricing for lunch and dinner is not too bothersome to me, and might make it an affordable option. But there is something about a cruise that says if I don't have 24-hour in suite dining for no reason other than the experience of luxury, it does turn me off.

  12. D3kingg Guest

    Clearly a better alternative than ownership of a yacht. I’m sure Zuckerberg can afford the annual maintenance of $3-$30 million on his recently purchased $300 million yacht but that is going to be a headache.

  13. dfw88 Guest

    Excluding lunch and dinner from the pricing is absurd. I know you're trying to defend this because Ford makes a ton of money off of Four Seasons, Lucky, but try to look at this rationally for a moment. It really makes no sense whatsoever.

    1. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ dfw88 -- I'll be honest, when I first heard that, I thought it sounded ridiculous as well. But let's think about it for a second. When Four Seasons Yachts was first announced, talk was that cruises would start at $2,500 per person per day, so that's a minimum of $5,000 per cabin per day. Instead, pricing is starting at just over half that.

      I think the issue is that this is being viewed through...

      @ dfw88 -- I'll be honest, when I first heard that, I thought it sounded ridiculous as well. But let's think about it for a second. When Four Seasons Yachts was first announced, talk was that cruises would start at $2,500 per person per day, so that's a minimum of $5,000 per cabin per day. Instead, pricing is starting at just over half that.

      I think the issue is that this is being viewed through the lens of the existing cruise industry. That's very much not the market Four Seasons Yachts is going after. Some people love cruises and all-inclusive resorts, and others don't, and I think that's fine. As we can all agree, Four Seasons manages to charge a lot of money for a lot of properties that aren't all-inclusive, and the properties are full.

      So I'm curious, do you think charging $5,000 per suite per day with everything included would be better than charging $3,000 per suite per day without lunch and dinner included? Personally I'd prefer the latter.

    2. Eskimo Guest

      @Lucky

      That's a very unrealistic comparison. Why not ask $10k vs $3k?
      If it costs the customer $1k per person per day to cater lunch+dinner then they should be doing nothing but sell $500 meals on every land resort.

      Try ask the questions again but with $3000 vs $3500 and not need to think about meals for the whole trip.

    3. Chris Guest

      No one buying these trips is going to care what lunch and dinner costs. If that's a concern, you are not the target customer.

    4. dfw88 Guest

      I agree with Eskimo below that it very much depends on the numbers you pick. Since we have no idea what numbers they floated internally in making this decision it's very hard to answer that question. We also haven't seen the menus yet (that I'm aware of) which is an important data point as well in terms of understanding how much lunch and dinner will cost.

      Your point about them going after a completely different...

      I agree with Eskimo below that it very much depends on the numbers you pick. Since we have no idea what numbers they floated internally in making this decision it's very hard to answer that question. We also haven't seen the menus yet (that I'm aware of) which is an important data point as well in terms of understanding how much lunch and dinner will cost.

      Your point about them going after a completely different market segment is really probably the best answer here. Much like people that stay at Four Seasons properties they're going after people that don't check price tags. Given that, yes, we agree that they fill their properties very well, it's a business model that has plenty of traction and I can absolutely see this working for them. Thanks for the discussion!

    5. DT Guest

      The sole fact that someone at some point assumed that something would cost X, and then it ends up costing Y (X>Y), alone does not make something reasonably priced. I have never been on a cruise, and never will be, but I also strongly associate it with all inclusive.

      I am also wondering, how, from a marketing perspective, to distinguish the higher end suites from a private yacht charter.

    6. Marcus Guest

      I would rather pay $3500 a day and have lunch and dinner included. The last thing I want to do is to schlep around random ports to find a place close by that won’t rip me off. Am a frequent cruiser

  14. Noa Guest

    People take a cruise to switch off their brain.

    Adding lunch and dinner at a price is the exact opposite. This wouldn't be relaxing at all unless you're filthy rich where $100-300 lunches and dinners daily literally don't matter

  15. Andy 11235 Guest

    Not sure how "affordable" this will be, once you add in the no-doubt extortionate prices for food. Land-based Four Seasons dining options charge $30 for a hamburger, so how much more are they going to tack on for your yacht dining experience? I suppose if you need to look at the menu prices, this cruise is not for you.

    1. Mike P Guest

      You think four seasons burgers only cost $30? LOL

  16. AdamH Guest

    I sort of get wanting to dine off the ship in Greece but way less so if you are in the Caribbean. Seems odd to not at least include meals while you are at sea like nearly every other ship.

    1. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ AdamH -- I really think Four Seasons isn't going after traditional cruisers with this concept, but rather is going after people who would otherwise stay at Four Seasons properties (all of which aren't all-inclusive). I think this different direction is quite deliberate, but we'll see how it plays out.

  17. Ben Holz Guest

    Santorini and Mykonos are more than understandable destinations and while I personally can't attest to the other mentioned islands in the Aegean sea as vacation spots, I am shocked to see Kos. Based on everything in this post the FS Cruise and brand are all about luxury, which very much contrasts Kos as a destination... Having been there (unfortunately) twice in the past 6 years, it very much feels to me as a run down...

    Santorini and Mykonos are more than understandable destinations and while I personally can't attest to the other mentioned islands in the Aegean sea as vacation spots, I am shocked to see Kos. Based on everything in this post the FS Cruise and brand are all about luxury, which very much contrasts Kos as a destination... Having been there (unfortunately) twice in the past 6 years, it very much feels to me as a run down destination ruined by the regular influx of refugee boats into the island (which if I am not mistaken, tends to increase in summer months). Heck, I even had a friend who, somewhat but not entirely, joking referred to it as something along the lines of 'Syria in an island".

    There are so many smaller islands which might not have the level of infrastructure and development that Kos has, but which are infinitely more picturesque, cozy and where there's a greater sense of security and comfort... Genuinely curious about the reasoning behind offering such a luxurious product in such a place.

  18. TravelinWilly Diamond

    Did someone say "water toys?"

    Tell us more...!

  19. AJR Guest

    "...pricing is actually more attractive than most people had assumed."

    $3,000 ....PER SUITE...PER DAY? Interesting. Admittedly, I'm not the targeted consumer but I have to question...what is the logic here!? I'm going to spend ~$20k+ for seven days (of fun?) AND I still have to go find my own food (bc lunch and dinner isn't included)? I thought the framework was...the more money I spend, the less decisions I have to make? I sincerely hope...

    "...pricing is actually more attractive than most people had assumed."

    $3,000 ....PER SUITE...PER DAY? Interesting. Admittedly, I'm not the targeted consumer but I have to question...what is the logic here!? I'm going to spend ~$20k+ for seven days (of fun?) AND I still have to go find my own food (bc lunch and dinner isn't included)? I thought the framework was...the more money I spend, the less decisions I have to make? I sincerely hope this 'spirit airlines/a la carte' business model doesn't backfire.

    1. JoePro Guest

      Not to fret: there are staff quarters onboard as well so your personal decision maker can join the voyage, too!

    2. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ AJR -- For what it's worth, when I wrote about Four Seasons Yachts last September, I speculated (based on no inside knowledge) that cruises would start at $1,500-2,000 per person per day. In the comments, not a single person agreed with me, and everyone said it would be way more expensive than that.

      So of course these journeys aren't "cheap," but I think it's safe to say that this is more affordable than most...

      @ AJR -- For what it's worth, when I wrote about Four Seasons Yachts last September, I speculated (based on no inside knowledge) that cruises would start at $1,500-2,000 per person per day. In the comments, not a single person agreed with me, and everyone said it would be way more expensive than that.

      So of course these journeys aren't "cheap," but I think it's safe to say that this is more affordable than most people had previously assumed.

      It's important to keep in mind the amount of space being allocated to each guest here. This is in a completely different league than just about anything else at sea. And that comes at a cost.

    3. Fonzi Guest

      And i guess you deliberately did not answer the issue with lunch/dinner.

    4. Chris Guest

      If you're concerned with the price of dinner and lunch, you aren't the target customer for this.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.

Chris Guest

If you're concerned with the price of dinner and lunch, you aren't the target customer for this.

1
Maxell Azaria Guest

Half the fun of cruising is the unlimited free food and putting away your wallet for the duration of the trip. This a la carte system makes no sense to me, perhaps it wont bother the weatlhier patrons.

1
JoePro Guest

Not to fret: there are staff quarters onboard as well so your personal decision maker can join the voyage, too!

1
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