Best Ways To Redeem Amex Membership Rewards Points

Best Ways To Redeem Amex Membership Rewards Points

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If you want to maximize your credit card rewards, I always recommend earning transferable points currencies for your spending whenever possible. In this post I wanted to take a detailed look at how to redeem Amex Membership Rewards points, given how many people earn this currency for their credit card spending.

Amex Membership Rewards points are easy to earn

There are several credit cards that earn Amex Membership Rewards points. American Express has both personal and business cards, letting you maximize your rewards across a wide variety of spending categories.

The following are the best personal cards for earning Amex points:

The following business cards earn Amex Membership Rewards points:

Read about my Amex credit card strategy here.

Redeem for Etihad business class

How much Amex Membership Rewards points are worth

Based on my methodology of valuing points currencies, I value Amex Membership Rewards points at 1.7 cents each. For that matter, that’s how much I value all major transferable points currencies. There’s no science to that, but rather I think it’s a fair but conservative valuation for how much value you could get if you’re maximizing your rewards.

How you can redeem Amex Membership Rewards points

Let’s take a brief look at how you can redeem Amex Membership Rewards points, and then we’ll talk about how you should redeem points to maximize value.

Amex Membership Rewards points can be transferred to airline and hotel partners. The program has the below 20 partners (the most of any transferable points currency), including 17 airlines and three hotel groups, and most transfers are at a 1:1 ratio.

Airline Partners
Hotel Partners
Aer Lingus AerClub
Choice Privileges
Aeromexico Club Premier
Hilton Honors
Air Canada Aeroplan
Marriott Bonvoy
Air France-KLM Flying Blue
ANA Mileage Club
Avianca LifeMiles
British Airways Executive Club
Cathay Pacific Asia Miles
Delta SkyMiles
Emirates Skywards
Etihad Guest
Hawaiian Airlines HawaiianMiles
Iberia Plus
JetBlue TrueBlue
Qantas Frequent Flyer
Singapore Airlines KrisFlyer
Virgin Atlantic Flying Club
American Express Membership Rewards transfer partners

There are plenty of other ways to redeem Amex points as well. Among other things, Amex Membership Rewards points can be redeemed in the following ways:

  • Toward cash, in the form of a statement credit
  • Toward shopping directly with popular retailers
  • Toward gift cards with a variety of retailers
  • Toward flight and hotel purchases

The catch is that generally speaking you won’t get more than one cent of value per point with these redemption methods. There is one exception when it comes to paying for flights, which I’ll address below.

Redeem for Virgin Atlantic business class

The best uses of Amex Membership Rewards points

You’ll get the most value with your Amex Membership Rewards points by transferring them to travel partners. That’s because all other options typically get you at most one cent of value per point, and you can hopefully do better than that. Below I wanted to share what I consider the best uses of American Express Membership Rewards points to be, roughly ranked starting with my favorite.

If transferring to airline partners, it’s important to understand that you’ll generally get the most value redeeming for international flights, especially in business class. Also, if you’re new to redeeming points, check out my top 10 tips for redeeming points, so you can hopefully get the best value.

Transfer to Air Canada Aeroplan

Air Canada Aeroplan is probably my single favorite frequent flyer program. Not only does Aeroplan have more airline partners than any other airline loyalty program, but you can also add stopovers to awards for 5,000 points one-way.

If you’re looking to redeem on Star Alliance, or a variety of other airline partners (ranging from Air Mauritius to Oman Air), booking through Aeroplan is an excellent option. For my own travels, I redeem more points through Aeroplan than any other frequent flyer program.

Redeem for Lufthansa first class

Transfer to All Nippon Airways Mileage Club

Amex is the only major points currency to partner with All Nippon Airways (ANA) Mileage Club. That’s exciting, because this Star Alliance carrier’s frequent flyer program has some incredible redemption opportunities, like roundtrip business class from the United Sates to Europe for 88,000 miles, or a round the world business class award (with up to 29,000 miles of travel) for 170,000 miles.

While the program potentially offers lots of value, there’s a huge learning curve to understanding this program, so make sure you do your research prior to transferring any points. This includes that there are restrictions on who you can redeem for, there are big carrier imposed surcharges on some partners, and more.

Redeem for ANA business class

Transfer to Avianca LifeMiles

Amex Membership Rewards has no shortage of Star Alliance partners. If you want a straightforward one-way award on a Star Alliance airline with just one or two segments, Avianca LifeMiles may be your best option. LifeMiles has great redemption rates without fuel surcharges. For example, a transatlantic business class award will generally start at 63,000 miles one-way, while a business class award to Southeast Asia will start at 78,000 miles one-way.

Just be aware that sometimes LifeMiles doesn’t have access to the same award space as other programs, so you’ll want to check that in advance.

Redeem for SWISS business class

Transfer to Singapore KrisFlyer

Singapore Airlines restricts most of its first class and business class award space to members of its own KrisFlyer program. So while the airline is in the Star Alliance, don’t expect to be able to snag Singapore Airlines long haul premium cabin awards through other programs.

Fortunately Singapore Airlines KrisFlyer has fair redemption rates, pretty good award availability in business class, and limited surcharges. This could be useful whether you want to travel on the world’s longest flight from New York to Singapore, or want to take one of Singapore Airlines’ fifth freedom flights, like New York to Frankfurt.

Redeem for Singapore Airlines business class

Transfer to Emirates Skywards

Emirates Skywards is the best way to book most Emirates tickets with miles. This could be useful whether you want to take one of Emirates’ fifth freedom flights (from Newark to Athens or New York to Milan), or whether you’re looking to fly with the airline to Dubai and beyond.

It’s even possible to redeem miles for Emirates first class, though it could take some work. A shower in the sky is a worthwhile reward, though! A first class award between the United States and Europe costs 85,000 Skywards miles one-way, if you can find award availability.

Redeem for Emirates business class

Transfer to Air France-KLM Flying Blue

If you want to fly across the Atlantic in business class, it’s tough to beat Flying Blue, as this is the key to unlocking Air France business class and KLM business class awards. Not only is this great if you’re looking to travel to Amsterdam and Paris, but the two airlines have extensive route networks throughout Europe and beyond.

You can generally expect that transatlantic business class awards will start around 55,000 miles one-way, with mild fuel surcharges (around $200 one-way). You can sometimes get even better pricing if you can book a Flying Blue Promo Rewards offer.

Redeem for KLM business class

Transfer to British Airways Executive Club

British Airways Executive Club is a useful frequent flyer program, especially for oneworld redemptions. Executive Club has a unique distance based award chart, so it’s a particularly useful points currency if you’re trying to redeem for travel on Alaska or American from or within the United States. Avios can be a great deal for travel to Hawaii and the Caribbean.

Avios are also useful for short haul redemptions in other regions, including within Asia and Australia. Lastly, Avios are an excellent value for travel in Qatar Airways business class, which is regarded as one of the best in the world.

Redeem for Qatar Airways business class

Can you pay for flights with Amex points?

Unlike with Chase Ultimate Rewards, there’s typically not an efficient way to redeem Amex Membership Rewards points directly toward the cost of a flight. Amex’s “Pay With Points” program for flights generally lets you redeem points toward flights at around one cent per point, which isn’t great.

There are two exceptions, though:

Now, there are some things to be aware of:

  • This rebate only applies when booking first or business class travel, or economy travel on your designated U.S. airline (you can designate an airline in your Amex account)
  • You can pool your Amex points across all cards and redeem at these rates, assuming you have one of the above cards
  • With this redemption option, the Amex Business Gold offers up to 250K points in rebates per year, and the Amex Business Platinum offers up to 500K points in rebates per year
  • You need to have the full Amex points for the redemption upfront (based on the rate of one cent per point), and then the 25-35% points rebate will post to your account within 6-10 weeks

I’d say this could be a good deal, though as you can tell, there are some major limitations here in terms of the cards you need to have, and how the redemptions work.

The “Pay With Points” feature can come in handy

How not to redeem Amex Membership Rewards points

I tend to think that if you feel good about an award redemption then that should be enough. At the same time, I’d generally aim to get more than one cent of value per Amex Membership Rewards point. As a result, I’d highly recommend avoiding the following redemptions:

  • Transferring points to Choice Privileges, Hilton Honors, and Marriott Bonvoy; these programs no doubt offer value in general, but based on the transfer ratio this just doesn’t make sense, as these points are worth less than other currencies on a per-point basis
  • Redeeming points for merchandise, statement credits, etc.; this will get you at most one cent of value per point (and in many cases even less), so you don’t want to redeem that way
  • Redeeming points through Amex Travel toward the cost of hotels, flights, and rental cars; the exception is if you have a card that offers a rebate on “Pay With Points” flight bookings, as that’s the primary way you’ll get more than one cent of value per point with this redemption option
Avoid transferring Amex points to Hilton Honors

Bottom line

Amex Membership Rewards is a popular points currency, especially given how many people have products like The Platinum Card® from American Express and American Express® Gold Card.

Amex has more transfer partners than other transferable points currencies, and generally that’s going to be the best way to use your Amex points. Personally my favorite Amex partners are Air Canada Aeroplan and All Nippon Airways Mileage Club, though I also get quite a bit of value from partners like Air France-KLM Flying Blue, Emirates Skywards, Singapore KrisFlyer, and more.

To those who collect Amex Membership Rewards points, what are your favorite uses of the currency?

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  1. Jason Allen Guest

    I live in Portland Oregon and have had trouble using Amex points . When I recently looked for flights to Italy I found that I needed twice as many Amex points to fly there as I needed Chase points When looking at various partners ( I used award logic). I ultimately went with Chase points for business class one way at 155,000 and regular on the way back. I wonder whether it Ben Slappig has...

    I live in Portland Oregon and have had trouble using Amex points . When I recently looked for flights to Italy I found that I needed twice as many Amex points to fly there as I needed Chase points When looking at various partners ( I used award logic). I ultimately went with Chase points for business class one way at 155,000 and regular on the way back. I wonder whether it Ben Slappig has advice for smallish airport users like me.

    After my experience looking at trajectories from Portland to Europe I've stopped focusing on Amex points ( and have turned the bulk of my spent back to Chase) and am optimistically holding on to My 350,000 Amex points thinking that I'll find a high value way to use it on a flight to Asia someday.

    Jason

  2. Beachfan Guest

    Iberia has the best availabilty TATL if you don’t want to pay extremely high surcharges.

    I never find availability from the west coast through Avianca. Been trying for years, every year I have to transfer 1k miles in to keep them from expiring. An albatross.

    Don’t SQ miles expire? Seems risky to transfer unless you are 1000% sure if the travel.

  3. Mantis Guest

    ANA, Asia Miles, Virgin Atlantic, and Aeroplan have been my go to transfer partners for USA-Asia F/J. My mantra is MR is for F/J, UR is for Hyatt. ANA is my primary, has high fees, but always lowest mileage price, but requires RT. Asia Miles is my backup OW when no availability with AA or AS. Virgin only for ANA F. Aeroplan is a backup and only bc I made the mistake of getting their cc with the two certs that I'm having a hard time using.

  4. Andrew Guest

    Honestly, ANA = Most valuable transfer partner

  5. john Guest

    Can someone please confirm my theory that United will not release any business class seats for any flights via the Aeroplan or Lifetime Plan programs. Plenty of coach but no biz seats. So frustrating when one has over 2 million amex points.

  6. NYGuy24 Gold

    Before rushing out to apply for credit cards to earn points for that first class redemption maybe actually check to see just how available those redemptions are. Chances are you aren't getting a seat in F on SQ anytime soon. Don't even think you will be able to redeem flights on ANA to Japan at the current time because your tickets have to be booked by a japanese travel agent. Airlines around the world are...

    Before rushing out to apply for credit cards to earn points for that first class redemption maybe actually check to see just how available those redemptions are. Chances are you aren't getting a seat in F on SQ anytime soon. Don't even think you will be able to redeem flights on ANA to Japan at the current time because your tickets have to be booked by a japanese travel agent. Airlines around the world are cutting service even though there is high demand, which means far fewer seats open to award redemptions. Do your homework before even jumping in. I'm sure there are lots of people out there who end up making subpar redemptions and actually lose money in the long run

    1. Anthony Diamond

      As long as you get value out of the annual fee and don’t pay interest, it is almost impossible to “lose’ money even if your redemptions are closer to 1 cent per point than 2 cents per point. Part of why maximizing every cent out of every point may not be worth the hassle

    2. RichM Member

      You potentially "lose" money because there is a marginal cost of earning rewards points, when the alternative would be to use a cashback credit card, or use reward points for statement credit, which gives you actual dollars back into your pocket.

      Your point about maximising every cent is a good one - for many people the simplicity and flexibility of straight cash may be better. Only people (like us!) who enjoy reading blogs like this...

      You potentially "lose" money because there is a marginal cost of earning rewards points, when the alternative would be to use a cashback credit card, or use reward points for statement credit, which gives you actual dollars back into your pocket.

      Your point about maximising every cent is a good one - for many people the simplicity and flexibility of straight cash may be better. Only people (like us!) who enjoy reading blogs like this and understanding the intricacies of FF programmes can justify the time taken to achieve better returns.

    3. Anthony Diamond

      1) Redeeming points at 1.2 or 1.1 or 1.0 cents per point also gives you actual cash back in your pocket - that cash would have been spent on the travel anyway

      2) Points earnings card tend to have higher multipliers - I would rather earn 4x on dining/groceries with Amex Gold (net fee if $0) than 2x on those categories via Double Cash even if I occasionally use MR for a 1.0 cent redemption...

      1) Redeeming points at 1.2 or 1.1 or 1.0 cents per point also gives you actual cash back in your pocket - that cash would have been spent on the travel anyway

      2) Points earnings card tend to have higher multipliers - I would rather earn 4x on dining/groceries with Amex Gold (net fee if $0) than 2x on those categories via Double Cash even if I occasionally use MR for a 1.0 cent redemption because I already earned more of them

      When we have a cash back card that earns 5% on flights, 4% on dining, etc with a cheap net fee, then pure cash back starts to make sense. Until then, hybrid strategies like MR, UR and TYP, all of which can be cashed out at a mimimim of 1 cent (with UR potentially at 1.5 cents) make more sense

  7. Anthony Diamond

    Hmm. While not recommended, I must admit I have done things like redeemed points at 1 cent for an Amex FHR booking, as well as transfer to Hilton… why?

    1) Amex has offered 1 to 3 MR to Hilton transfer bonuses in the past. I value Hilton points at 0.05, and MR at 1.5 cents at best, so I will use this to top off if I need to.

    2) Sometimes I don’t want to...

    Hmm. While not recommended, I must admit I have done things like redeemed points at 1 cent for an Amex FHR booking, as well as transfer to Hilton… why?

    1) Amex has offered 1 to 3 MR to Hilton transfer bonuses in the past. I value Hilton points at 0.05, and MR at 1.5 cents at best, so I will use this to top off if I need to.

    2) Sometimes I don’t want to come out of pocket for an Amex Travel booking, for whatever reason. if it costs $600, I may redeem 40K points and get the $200 credit for the other portion.

    3) Almost all of the best redemptions involve international travel in business class or higher. I take one or two big international trips on my own dime a year, and I can pay for flights a variety of ways for those (American points, etc). On the other hand, I may take five or six domestic leisure trips a year. Some of these lower per cent Amex redemptions can be useful for domestic travel.

  8. Billy Bob Guest

    Useful but one thing: expiration of miles.
    Some they do, and some they don't. And some you just can't tell.

  9. Michael E Guest

    Since I only use Bonvoy or Hilton points with 5th night free, you have to factor that in. Can be better than you suggest depending on need. Also, to get my airline elite status I don’t use points, I earn them. Maybe misguided, but sure seems to work well. I booked flights this summer on BA using Amex points. Worked like a charm, great value, until one of the flights was cancelled. The difficulty working...

    Since I only use Bonvoy or Hilton points with 5th night free, you have to factor that in. Can be better than you suggest depending on need. Also, to get my airline elite status I don’t use points, I earn them. Maybe misguided, but sure seems to work well. I booked flights this summer on BA using Amex points. Worked like a charm, great value, until one of the flights was cancelled. The difficulty working with Amex Travel was a killer. BA told me to work with my agent despite my OneWorld status. Lousy flight in the end, getting into Manchester, UK about midnight. Never again.

  10. Tom Guest

    For me, at least, what makes transfers to Avios attractive is the 1-to-1.4 transfer ratio that seems to come along every couple of years or so. That makes a mid-con trip on AA, for example, cost under 16K points instead of 22K.

  11. Lee Guest

    DCS, don't waste your time reading this blog. And, certainly, don't waste your time commenting to articles or others' comments. Sadly, the author and readers cannot comprehend the beauty of your keen insights. You have a special gift that few if any at all will ever appreciate. You should be proud of achieving what you have. Are you a millennial?

    Ben, thanks for the great article. You are helping people become smarter about their points. Keep plugging away.

  12. Andrew Diamond

    I want to give Ben kudos for the last few articles on topics like this - props for not calling out the VS ANA redemptions. Those things are so scarce and (thanks to Japan's forced-tour bookings) still unusable that they don't deserve press for redemption. Thank you for focusing on other opportunities!

    1. Andrew Guest

      I got two ANA F seats from JFK for next month, so they are available. It's just because there is travel vengeance right now. They release the awards so they will be available soon enough.

    2. Andrew Diamond

      My home airport is SFO. LAX, SFO, SJC and SEA have squat for availability. YVR is so-so, but a hassle to connect at.

      I'm not adding 10 hours to my trip (5+ each way) for ORD, IAD or JFK, so limited practicality.

  13. DCS Diamond

    Transferring points to Choice Privileges, Hilton Honors, and Marriott Bonvoy; these programs no doubt offer value in general, but based on the transfer ratio this just doesn’t make sense, as these points are worth less than other currencies on a per-point basis.

    The whole claim makes no sense because all hotel loyalty points currencies are worth exactly the same when adjust for differences in earn rates for the same spend, meaning that quoted claim won't...

    Transferring points to Choice Privileges, Hilton Honors, and Marriott Bonvoy; these programs no doubt offer value in general, but based on the transfer ratio this just doesn’t make sense, as these points are worth less than other currencies on a per-point basis.

    The whole claim makes no sense because all hotel loyalty points currencies are worth exactly the same when adjust for differences in earn rates for the same spend, meaning that quoted claim won't become true no matter how often it is repeated. See my post here to be edified as to why:
    https://onemileatatime.com/guides/redeem-chase-ultimate-rewards-points/

    The relative 'worth' of different points currencies in cpp cannot be determined by comparing the "cents" part (the numerator) and ignoring the points currency denomination part (the denominator).

    You cannot compare 1.7 cents/MR point vs. 0.5 cent/Hilton point and claim that the latter is "worth" less than the former because that is like comparing apples and oranges.

    You could not do this math, which is what you are essentially doing in claiming that the MR point is "worth" more:

    1.7 cents/MR point + 0.5 cent/Hilton point = 2.2 cents/what exactly?

    because the denominators are different !!!

    You could do this math though:

    1.7 cents/MR point + 0.5 cent/MR point = 2.2 cents/MR point

    because the denominators are the same.

    Got it now?

    1. Never In Doubt Guest

      OMAAT's leading pedant,

      I'm sure your 4th grade math teacher loved you.

      Since you seem to be having trouble, let me simplify Ben's comparison for you.

      1 MR point transferred to a generic airline transfer partner yields ~1.7¢* of value.

      1 MR point transferred to Hilton yields ~1.0¢* of value.

      *Adjust those numbers based on what values you assign for an individual airline partner or Hilton.

      Reasonable people can disagree on the US$ value...

      OMAAT's leading pedant,

      I'm sure your 4th grade math teacher loved you.

      Since you seem to be having trouble, let me simplify Ben's comparison for you.

      1 MR point transferred to a generic airline transfer partner yields ~1.7¢* of value.

      1 MR point transferred to Hilton yields ~1.0¢* of value.

      *Adjust those numbers based on what values you assign for an individual airline partner or Hilton.

      Reasonable people can disagree on the US$ value of a United mile or a Hilton point, but you can't disagree with the *process* of that comparison.

    2. DCS Diamond

      My quantum mechanics professor loved me even more than did my 4th grade teacher.
      When you have something smart to say, which is unlikely, ring me up, because you are not just confused. You are clueless about being clueless.

      G'day.

    3. Catherine Luttinger Guest

      Why so hostile? This blog is really helpful for people like me who are new to points and miles. No reason to be rude.

    4. DCS Diamond

      Is "rude" to correct misconceptions that may actually be even more helpful to people like you?

      Get real!

    5. Eskimo Guest

      As funny as it may seem, Quantum mechanics is probably the only way to explain @DCS logics.

      In simple terms.
      We can't compare the value of a gallon of milk and a loaf of bread. Because well, they have different denominator. While most of us would consider $5 worth of milk is equal to $5 worth of bread. It works that way because of the open market that accepts money as a medium of...

      As funny as it may seem, Quantum mechanics is probably the only way to explain @DCS logics.

      In simple terms.
      We can't compare the value of a gallon of milk and a loaf of bread. Because well, they have different denominator. While most of us would consider $5 worth of milk is equal to $5 worth of bread. It works that way because of the open market that accepts money as a medium of exchange but it doesn't in any way prove or determine the value of milk. Just an agreed barter using a currency.

      One of the Quantum mechanics principle is a tradeoff between measurable subatomic quantities. But will be impossible to measure its momentum.
      In simple terms, It explains @DCS and lets you compare subatomic particles of milk and bread thus having a same denominator and could determine what is actually worth more but only at a given time as momentum in time would affect the subatomic relativity.

    6. DCS Diamond

      The math is kindergarten-level.

    7. Mantis Guest

      If they are all worth the same, care to transfer 1000k MR to me? I'll transfer 1000k HH in return.

      Seriously, you are just being obtuse. Are you trying to be philosphical, or can you not realize the obvious? Look at the prices of comparable hotel redemptions. Hyatt high end properties are ~40k, Hilton are ~200k. Can you do that math?

    8. Anthony Diamond

      While Hyatt points are clearly worth more than Hilton points,

      1) Hyatt high end properties are costing more like 45K or so nowadays
      2) Very few Hilton high end properties are at 200K - most are at 120K or so
      3) Amex transfers 1 to 3 to Hilton during transfer bonuses. Chase transfers 1 to 1 to Hyatt, always
      4) You earn 4x on dining with Amex, 3x with Chase
      ...

      While Hyatt points are clearly worth more than Hilton points,

      1) Hyatt high end properties are costing more like 45K or so nowadays
      2) Very few Hilton high end properties are at 200K - most are at 120K or so
      3) Amex transfers 1 to 3 to Hilton during transfer bonuses. Chase transfers 1 to 1 to Hyatt, always
      4) You earn 4x on dining with Amex, 3x with Chase
      5) It is much easier to earn a lot of Hilton points with paid stays than Hyatt points
      6) Hilton also offers 5th night free, which an bring per night redemptions now

      What does this all mean? Transferring 40 or 50K Hilton points during a transfer bonus time period to top off your Hilton balance (which you already padded with paid stays) for a five night Waldorf Beverly Hills or Maldives redemption, is clearly a great use of MR points. So is transferring UR to Hyatt for both redemptions. Diversify, and YMMV.

    9. DCS Diamond

      While Hyatt points are clearly worth more than Hilton points,

      Et tu, Antonio!

      Do you make that silly claim because, like everyone else, you believe that the inequality

      1.5cents/Hyatt points > 0.5cent/Hilton point

      is correct?

      Well, that is the myth. The reality is that Hyatt points and Hilton points are worth exactly the same.
      If you do not believe that, then please enlighten us as to how you reached that...

      While Hyatt points are clearly worth more than Hilton points,

      Et tu, Antonio!

      Do you make that silly claim because, like everyone else, you believe that the inequality

      1.5cents/Hyatt points > 0.5cent/Hilton point

      is correct?

      Well, that is the myth. The reality is that Hyatt points and Hilton points are worth exactly the same.
      If you do not believe that, then please enlighten us as to how you reached that demonstrably erroneous conclusion...

      Wanna know something? Everyone focuses on the redemption side of points, but does not realize that it is the earn side of points that determines the nominal values of points that are constantly peddled but are universally misunderstood.

      Anyway, we'll be waiting to be edified with bated breath about how "Hyatt points are clearly worth more than Hilton points". (Hint: do not forget the denominators are different!).

    10. Anthony Diamond

      DCS my friend,

      You can say things like
      - $1 of spend at a Hilton hotel generates the same amount of value as $1 of spend at a Hyatt hotel (it actually may be more)
      - $1 of dining spend on an Amex Gold is equivalent to $1 of restaurant spend on a Hyatt card (harder IMO)

      But you can't say 1 Hilton point is equal to 1 Hyatt point

      In terms of...

      DCS my friend,

      You can say things like
      - $1 of spend at a Hilton hotel generates the same amount of value as $1 of spend at a Hyatt hotel (it actually may be more)
      - $1 of dining spend on an Amex Gold is equivalent to $1 of restaurant spend on a Hyatt card (harder IMO)

      But you can't say 1 Hilton point is equal to 1 Hyatt point

      In terms of earnings on paid stays, I agree that Hilton generally returns better than Hyatt (and often Marriott). However when transferring from a transferrable currency, Hyatt is usually better (outside of transfer bonuses) given the redemption values. However as I said before I have transferred MR to Hilton before, and will continue to do so when it makes sense, as it does a few times a year

    11. Lee Guest

      Anthony, you are correct. But, don't waste your time with DCS. DCS has a bug up the butt on the subject and is known on various blogs for voluminous expositions on the economics of hotels to educate us poor morons. Just ignore.

    12. DCS Diamond

      But you can't say 1 Hilton point is equal to 1 Hyatt point

      I never made that stupid claim. It is you and everyone else that make the claim implicitly when you simply compare "cents" in 1.5 cents/Hyatt points vs. 0.5 cent/Hilton points to declare that the Hyatt point is "worth" more. You can make that claim only if you assume that the denominators are the same (i.e., 1 Hyatt point = 1 Hilton point),...

      But you can't say 1 Hilton point is equal to 1 Hyatt point

      I never made that stupid claim. It is you and everyone else that make the claim implicitly when you simply compare "cents" in 1.5 cents/Hyatt points vs. 0.5 cent/Hilton points to declare that the Hyatt point is "worth" more. You can make that claim only if you assume that the denominators are the same (i.e., 1 Hyatt point = 1 Hilton point), which would then allow you to compare the "cents" (numerators) directly. However, you cannot do that precisely because 1 Hyatt point is NOT equal to 1 Hilton point since one earns different numbers of Hyatt points and Hilton points for spending the same number of cents!!!

      A cent is a cent but a point is not a point if one earns a different number of points for the same number of cents spent!!!

      So, in

      1.5 cents/ Hyatt point vs. 0.5 cent/Hilton point

      the denominators are clearly different. Just as you would not compare 1.5 cents/gallon vs. 0.5 cents/liter directly and decide a priori that 1.5 cents per gallon costs more then 0.5cent/liter, you cannot compare 1.5 cents/Hyatt point vs. 0.5 cent/Hilton point and decide a priori that the Hyatt point is "worth" more. You must first convert gallons to liters or Hyatt points to Hilton points, or vice versa to know the relative costs or values. It is exactly the same with

      So, in

      1.5 cents/Hyatt point vs. 0.5 cent/Hilton point

      how do you convert cents PER Hyatt point to cents PER Hilton point? You do a points currency conversion, just as you would do a hard currency conversion (Euros to USDs) !!!
      That is why the EARN rates, INCLUDING points from co-branded credit cards, determine the relative "values" of points.

      A Hilton Diamond earns 3x more Hilton points per spend than a Hyatt Globalist earns Hyatt points for the same spend.

      So, 1.5 cents/Hyatt point will convert to:

      1.5cents/Hyatt points * (1 Hyatt point/3 Hilton points) = 0.5 cents/Hilton point.

      See that?

      So, please repeat the following until it sinks in :

      1.5 cents/Hyatt point = 0.5 cent/Hilton point

      The fact that the bolded denominators (Hilton point, Hyatt point) are different should tell you that it is utterly stupid to just compare the numerators (0.5 vs. 1.5 cents) and claim that the Hyatt point is "worth" more. The equality sign ('=') above is for real. 0.5 cent/Hilton point is equal tp 1.5 cents/Hyatt point, and they would buy you exactly the same thing in the respective programs.

      You can do the same type of conversion with the other hotel programs' points currencies to establish that they are all "worth" exactly the same.

      0.7 cent/BonVoy point = 0.5 cent/HH point = 0.5 cent/IHG point = 1.5 cents/WoH = 0.36 cent/Radisson point.

      There is no 1:1:1:1 equivalence among the points currencies because each program awards different numbers of points for the same number of cents spent!
      When one adjusts for the different earn rates, all the points currencies are "worth" exactly the same.

      Kindergarten-easy stuff to understand but I am sure you are confused, just like everyone else is...

    13. DCS Diamond

      I can do the math and I am the only one who clearly saw the obvious on Day 1 because it is so trivial, which is why I am 100% sure that you cannot do the math and are utterly clueless like virtually everyone else.

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Mantis Guest

If they are all worth the same, care to transfer 1000k MR to me? I'll transfer 1000k HH in return. Seriously, you are just being obtuse. Are you trying to be philosphical, or can you not realize the obvious? Look at the prices of comparable hotel redemptions. Hyatt high end properties are ~40k, Hilton are ~200k. Can you do that math?

1
Never In Doubt Guest

OMAAT's leading pedant, I'm sure your 4th grade math teacher loved you. Since you seem to be having trouble, let me simplify Ben's comparison for you. 1 MR point transferred to a generic airline transfer partner yields ~1.7¢* of value. 1 MR point transferred to Hilton yields ~1.0¢* of value. *Adjust those numbers based on what values you assign for an individual airline partner or Hilton. Reasonable people can disagree on the US$ value of a United mile or a Hilton point, but you can't disagree with the *process* of that comparison.

1
DCS Diamond

I can do the math and I am the only one who clearly saw the obvious on Day 1 because it is so trivial, which is why I am 100% sure that you cannot do the math and are utterly clueless like virtually everyone else.

0
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