How Much Are Airline, Hotel, And Credit Card Points Worth?

How Much Are Airline, Hotel, And Credit Card Points Worth?

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I often get asked how much I value various miles & points currencies, including those issued with credit cards, airlines, and hotels. The truth is that there’s no valuation for these currencies that everyone will agree on. That’s because the value that you’ll get from rewards points will vary significantly based on how you redeem them, and that’s also largely based on your travel goals.

Nonetheless I try to use my knowledge of these programs to assign a value to each currency, which can fluctuate over time. Below I’ll share my updated valuations of many major miles & points currencies, and then afterwards I’ll explain my methodology. Note that I’ve significantly adjusted my valuation of many currencies, to reflect the devaluations we’ve seen recently.

Value of bank & credit card points September 2023

To me, transferable credit card points are the gold standard of rewards currencies. They offer a ton of flexibility, since you can transfer them to all kinds of partners. On top of that, there are so many lucrative credit cards that offer generous rewards structures for earning these points.

Personally I always try to earn transferable points currencies with my credit card spending. Unlike other points currencies, I value these more or less the same, given just how many partners each program has.

Below are my valuations of the major transferable points currencies.

Program
Value
1.7 cents/point
1.7 cents/point
1.7 cents/point
1.7 cents/point
1.7 cents/point
Credit card points give you endless flexibility for travel

Value of airline miles September 2023

There are lots of ways to earn airline miles, from actually flying, to using co-branded airline credit cards. The value of airline miles does vary significantly between programs. It’s important to keep in mind that major airlines have lots of partners, so the value of these miles isn’t just based on the ability to redeem for travel on that particular airline, but also based on the ability to redeem for travel on partner airlines.

Below are my valuations of the major airline mileage currencies.

Program
Value
1.3 cents/mile
1.3 cents/mile
1.5 cents/mile
1.3 cents/mile
1.5 cents/mile
1.4 cents/mile
1.5 cents/mile
1.4 cents/mile
1.3 cents/mile
1.2 cents/mile
1.1 cents/mile
1.2 cents/mile
1.1 cents/mile
1.3 cents/mile
1.3 cents/mile
1.3 cents/mile
1.5 cents/mile
1.2 cents/mile
1.4 cents/mile
1.2 cents/mile
1.4 cents/mile
1.1 cents/mile
1.1 cents/mile

I wanted to specifically call out some of the changes in valuations I’ve made with this update:

My valuation of rewards currencies are intended to be conservative by design, so that people don’t unnecessarily or unrealistically hoard their points.

Redeem airline miles for first class flights

Value of hotel points September 2023

Much like with airline miles, hotel points can be earned either through staying at hotels, or by using co-branded hotel credit cards. Generally hotel points are easier to redeem than airline miles, given that there aren’t as many capacity controls or restrictions when redeeming them. That’s one of the reason many prefer to earn hotel points rather than airline miles.

Below are my valuations of the major hotel points currencies.

Program
Value
2.0 cents/point
0.5 cents/point
0.6 cents/point
0.5 cents/point
0.5 cents/point
0.7 cents/point
0.3 cents/point
1.5 cents/point
0.7 cents/point

I’m not lowering my valuations of any of these currencies right now, even though we’ve seen some devaluations. Why? While more points are now needed for many hotel stays, revenue rates have also gone up considerably. Some might argue “well flight costs have gone up as well.” That’s not untrue in economy, but generally my valuation of miles is based on aspirational redemptions, and the cost of first and business class tickets hasn’t necessarily gone up.

Redeem hotel points for luxury hotels

How to go about valuing miles & points

With the above out of the way, how do I actually go about coming up with a value for miles & points? First of all, let me share that I’ve been obsessed with miles & points for 15+ years. Keeping track of these programs is my passion (and my job), and I’ve also helped people redeem well over a billion miles over the years. I’d like to think I have a bit of experience.

Even so, that’s not to say that you should value miles & points the same way I do. Let me share some basics on how I go about valuing miles & points, and everyone can decide for themselves how they want to go about it.

Miles & points can’t be valued objectively

Miles & points are ultimately a form of currency, so you might be wondering why we can’t value them objectively. After all, there are exchange rates between monetary currencies, even though different factors impact their valuations.

There are a few reasons miles & points (at least for non-revenue based programs) can’t be valued objectively in a useful way:

  • There are so many different ways to redeem miles & points, which will give you vastly different valuations
  • There’s typically not a way to “cash out” your miles & points, and when there is, that’s generally not the most efficient way to use them
  • Everyone has different travel goals, and you’ll get different value depending on whether your priority is taking the family to Disney World, or flying first class to Singapore
  • Miles & points can be devalued over time, and are generally the property of the loyalty program rather than the member, so really we’re just playing by the programs’ games

Let me give a concrete example of why there’s no correct objective valuation of rewards points. Let’s say you have Capital One miles, which I value at 1.7 cents each, and you transfer those to Air Canada Aeroplan. You could redeem 90,000 points for a one-way ticket in Lufthansa first class from Newark to Frankfurt.

Meanwhile if paying cash, that ticket would cost over $12,000.

Alternatively, you could redeem 109,300 miles for a one-way ticket in Air Canada business class from Fort Lauderdale to Montreal.

Meanwhile if paying cash, that ticket would cost $1,171.

As you can see, you can redeem fewer miles for a ticket that would cost more than 10x as much when paying cash. This is purely intended to be an example, but hopefully at least demonstrates the complexity of valuing these currencies.

Redeem rewards points for Lufthansa first class

Be conservative when valuing miles & points

For a variety of reasons, I try to be conservative when it comes to valuing miles & points:

  • Miles & points can be devalued by programs at any time, so you have to apply some sort of a discount to them to account for that; in general there’s much more of a risk of devaluation for an individual airline or hotel currency, rather than a transferable points currency
  • With most programs, you don’t actually own your miles & points; they belong to the program, and you’re just allowed to use them as long as you have an account in good standing
  • People should be encouraged to earn & burn, and creating an artificially high value for points discourages that

As you can see, I value credit card rewards points more than a vast majority of individual airline currencies, even though those are the best ways to redeem them. That’s because I’m willing to value the points at a premium for the added flexibility that they offer.

Redeem rewards points for JetBlue Mint business class

Valuing miles & points is both absolute & relative

Coming up with a valuation of a mile or point is both an absolute and relative exercise:

  • The valuation should be absolute in the sense that a currency should be valued somewhere between the typical acquisition cost and the typical redemption cost; at the end of the day this is why I value most of these currencies at somewhere around one to two cents each
  • It’s relative because the way I come up with differing valuations between currencies is based on the pros & cons of redeeming with each program in terms of redemption rates, routing rules, and more
Valuing miles & points isn’t a science

How you’ll get the most value with your miles & points

Generally speaking, if you want to get the most value from miles & points, there are two key aspects to that:

  • You should spend some time studying these programs, because the deals to be had are in some cases amazing
  • In general you’ll get the most value from points if you’re looking for aspirational redemptions, like staying at five star hotels, or booking international first & business class flights, where the cash value would be disproportionately high

Admittedly that’s not how everyone wants to redeem, and that’s totally fine:

  • If you don’t have a lot of points, it’s probably not worth investing the time to study these programs all that carefully
  • If you have a family with toddlers, then understandably your priority might be traveling to somewhere close by and having a room with a lot of space, rather than flying halfway around the world to stay at a five star hotel
Everyone is looking for different travel experiences with miles & points

Don’t fall for the retail cost fallacy

I think it’s important not to get too carried away with points valuations. For example, above I showed a $12,000+ one-way first class ticket from Newark to Frankfurt on Lufthansa that could be booked with 90,000 Aeroplan points.

Yes, on the surface I suppose you are getting over 13 cents of value per point. However, don’t focus on that too much. For mental accounting purposes, personally I value redemptions based on how much I’d otherwise actually be willing to pay for that experience. I would never, ever drop that kind of cash on a one-way first class ticket.

So while on paper that might be the valuation, I always ask myself how much I’d be willing to pay for a first class ticket to Europe. Personally I’d estimate that I’d probably actually value that flight at $1,500, in terms of what I’d otherwise be willing to pay.

I’m not looking to get into a huge debate here about perceived value rather than retail value, but my point is that it’s important to consider how much you value these premium experiences, rather than just how much they cost.

Don’t take a trip just because it would cost a lot when paying cash, but rather do what you want to do, and try to maximize value along the way. At least that’s my take.

How much would you actually pay for a first class experience?

Don’t value miles & points based on one redemption

Another thing I consider with each points currency is how many good redemption options there are. The more flexibility and more options there are, the most I value those currencies. Don’t just value a points currency based on a single award ticket sweet spot.

For example, redeeming Virgin Atlantic Flying Club points on All Nippon Airways is a phenomenal value. However, we recently saw the first class redemption rates get devalued considerably, and on top of that, first and business class award availability on ANA can be really tough to come by.

So while you could get a ton of value from Virgin Atlantic Flying Club points if you manage to find availability, you don’t want to value a currency exclusively based on one redemption. I try to factor in these sweet spot redemptions while acknowledging that they provide limited flexibility.

Redeeming Virgin Atlantic miles for ANA first class is a good value

Bottom line

Hopefully the above is a useful rundown of the value of various credit card, airline, and hotel points currencies. There’s no absolute right or wrong way to value points, and it’s totally reasonable if your valuation is different than mine. My goal is just to share my take, and provide a general framework for valuing these currencies.

I’ll keep my valuations updated over time, to reflect changes with these various points currencies.

How do you go about valuing miles & points, and are your valuations substantially different than any of mine?

Conversations (38)
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  1. mileagespot Guest

    Insightful article on the value of miles and points. It offers practical advice for getting the most out of loyalty program rewards. check out t.ly/Zoxr for more insights on miles

  2. DCS Diamond

    "DCS: I'm really Kool + Smart because I can type alot on others blogs in italics and bold letters, (that means I'm right about everything)."
    --BenjaminGuttery

    "This DCS dude has been a nuisance/ pain in the a** for years. His arrogance is really annoying."
    --BobNL

    I feel your pain...really. See if you can reconcile your stupid and vitriolic comments with the mathematical purity of the evidence of your cluelessness below.

    1. DCS Diamond

      With that comment, you proved that you are an idiot. Now prove that I am one.

    2. UA-NYC Diamond

      Since DCS endlessly spams this blog with his absolute nonsense, only fair that the OMAAT readers respond in kind on his:

      https://travelrealitycheck.blog/contact/

    3. DCS Diamond

      "Absolute nonsense" or "spam" is what clueless folks call matters that are way over their heads. If you are going to call something "nonsense", then you must demonstrate why that is. It is what I said of the so-called "axiomatic" values of points that this site has been publishing for years, and I have made my case mathematically.

      Now, what I will get on my site will be actual spam because I doubt that...

      "Absolute nonsense" or "spam" is what clueless folks call matters that are way over their heads. If you are going to call something "nonsense", then you must demonstrate why that is. It is what I said of the so-called "axiomatic" values of points that this site has been publishing for years, and I have made my case mathematically.

      Now, what I will get on my site will be actual spam because I doubt that many OMAAT readers have enough gray matter between the ears to understand what is published on my site.

  3. Cosmo Guest

    So I'm in the UK which is a bit less of a competitive credit card market. I have the normal Amex rewards card, which earns 1 point / £1, and an Amex cashback card, which earns 0.5%. I can turn points into 0.45% cashback, or gift cards at 0.5%. I don't have enough to be able to fly or upgrade anything - is it really worth earning points in this situation?

  4. DCS Diamond

    PARTING SHOT
    @Ben, the OMAAT forum host, shared his updated valuations of many major miles & points currencies, and then in a section titled "How to go about valuing miles & points", he explained his "methodology", which consists of a set of axioms:
    -- Miles & points can’t be valued objectively
    -- Be conservative when valuing miles & points
    -- Valuing miles & points is both absolute & relative
    --...

    PARTING SHOT
    @Ben, the OMAAT forum host, shared his updated valuations of many major miles & points currencies, and then in a section titled "How to go about valuing miles & points", he explained his "methodology", which consists of a set of axioms:
    -- Miles & points can’t be valued objectively
    -- Be conservative when valuing miles & points
    -- Valuing miles & points is both absolute & relative
    -- How you’ll get the most value with your miles & points
    -- Don’t fall for the retail cost fallacy
    -- Don’t value miles & points based on one redemption

    There is only one problem: it is unclear how he goes from that set of axioms to the numerical values he has been publishing for years.

    The truth of the matter is that there is no way to go from the set axioms to o his numerical values of points currencies because the axioms are all wrong, and I will demonstrate just how wrong with the first axiom, which is that:

    Miles & points can’t be valued objectively

    At least in the case of hotel loyalty points currencies, which I have modeled extensively, that statement or axiom is completely false.

    "Face" values of hotel loyalty points currencies, which are the ones that this and other travel blogs publish to great fanfare, can be valued objectively because they are assigned and fixed by each program to yield exactly the same return on the dollar as their competitors.

    Typically, each program fixes the "face" value of its points currency and simply adjusts members' base earn rates (BER) to yield exactly the same return on the dollar as their competitors.

    Without going into the derivations, here's the proof that values of hotel points can be calculated analytically, i.e., objectively, according to the following equation:

    Value of Point = 15.649 * BER^(-0.993)

    BER is the "base earn rate" for the top elite status in each program; and BER^(-0.993) means "base earn rate raised to the power of -0.993".

    First, here is each program's "base earn rate", with bonus points from comparable co-branded CCs included (this is a must to maximize accuracy):

    - Hilton Honors Diamond: 20x + 12x (AMEX Surpass, AF: $95) = 32 HH points/$
    - World of Hyatt Globalist: 6.5x + 4x (Chase WoH visa, AF: $95) = 10.5 WoH points/$
    - Marriott BONVoY Titanium: 17.5x + 6x (Chase Boundless, AF: $95) = 23.5x BONVoY points/$
    - IHG Diamond: 20x + 10x (IHG Club Premier MC, AF: $99) = 30 IHG points/$
    - Radisson Rewards Plat: 35x + 10x (Radisson Rewards Premier Visa, AF: $75) = 45 Radisson points/$

    Now let's crunch the numbers and calculate the value of each hotel points currency analytically ("objectively") using the equation:

    Value of Point = 15.649 * BER^(-0.993)

    1. Value of a Hilton point = 15.649 * 32^(-0.993) = 0.50 cent/HH point
    2. Value of a Hyatt point = 15.649 * 10.5^(-0.993) = 1.52 cents/WoH point
    3. Value of a IHG point = 15.649 * 30.0^(-0.993) = 0.53 cent/IHG point
    4. Value of a Marriott point = 15.649 * 23.5^(-0.993) = 0.68 cent/BONVoY point
    5. Value of a Radisson point = 15.649 * 45.0^(-0.993) = 0.36 cent/Radisson point

    If you know how to use a scientific calculator, please do the math yourself to make sure that I am not fudging the numbers.

    In fact, the equation

    Value of Point = 15.649 * BER^(-0.993)

    which fell automatically out of my modeling, can be simplified further as

    Value of Point = 16.0/BER

    The constant 16, which also automatically fell out of the modeling, is 16%. It corresponds to the return on the dollar that loyalty programs strive to keep the same as their competitors'.

    Here's how things work:

    The "base earn rate" of a Hyatt Globalist with the Chase visa (4x) is 10.5x, the value I calculated above for a WoH point is 1.53cpp
    Return on the Dollar = (10.5 points/$ * 0.0153cent/point) * 100% = 10.5 * 1.53 = 16%

    Here are the "returns on the dollar" for all the programs (rounded up or down):

    WoH Globalist "return of the dollar" = 10.5 * 1.53 = 16%
    BonVoy Platinum (and higher) = 23.5 * 0.68 = 16%
    HH Diamond: 32.0 * 0.5 = 16 %
    IHG Diamond: 30.0 * 0.53 = 16%
    Radisson Rewards Platinum: 45.0 * 0.36 = 16%

    See that? All hotel loyalty points currencies are worth exactly the same.

    Bottom line: Unlike TPG and other sites that do hundreds of dummy bookings to estimate the mean or average values of points currencies that they publish, which for VERY LARGE numbers of dummy bookings would be statistically the same as the values that I calculated analytically above, OMAAT is simply what is called "an aggregator". It simply takes other sites' numbers, aggregates them and comes up with values that it claims to be its own based on its "methodology". However, the so-called "methodology" does not produce actual numbers!

    Hotel loyalty points currencies can be valued objectively.
    Q.E.D

    1. Julia Guest

      No one cares about the views of a Hilton Fanboy of your caliber

    2. DCS Diamond

      @Julia, the comment is not even about Hilton...but you wouldn't know that, would you? Read it if you even can. It will teach you more in the 3 minutes it'll take you to read it than all that you've learned in the years that you've been reading travel blogs.

  5. Anonymous Guest

    Do the Hotel point values include free night bonus?

    When redeeming points for a 1 night stay or 5 night stay, should one use the same Hilton 0.5cpp valuation to decide paying cash instad?

    1. BenjaminGuttery Diamond

      No, they do not. If they did, he would say so. Also, every program doesn't do something similar.

  6. E C Guest

    How do you get 1.7 cents per point for transferable bank card points? I can see it for the isolated situation of Chase points redeemed for Hyatt nights, but am clueless, otherwise. Also, I suppose you might get it if there is a bonus offered for a transfer. Is the 1.7 cents for just those of us that have the most premium of bank cards that typically yield a better return upon redemption?

    1. Mike C Diamond

      It's not in the direct transfer, and it's not about a single transfer. It's Ben's assessment of the average value you can get if you consider how many of those points you need to redeem a reward on a frequent flyer program. You have to transfer the points via the program, but think about it as 'I needed 100k transferable points to redeem this seat via [say] Aeroplan' and calculate what the points are worth...

      It's not in the direct transfer, and it's not about a single transfer. It's Ben's assessment of the average value you can get if you consider how many of those points you need to redeem a reward on a frequent flyer program. You have to transfer the points via the program, but think about it as 'I needed 100k transferable points to redeem this seat via [say] Aeroplan' and calculate what the points are worth that way, pretending you did it directly and not via Aeroplan.

      It's the same thought process as buying points for cash. It doesn't matter how many Aeroplan points you had to buy to redeem a reward, all you care about is how much money you had to shell out for however many you needed to buy.

  7. DeeCeeEss Guest

    Not suprising from Hyatt. Hyatt fanboys do not realize that Hilton points are a whopping 5 to 6 times more valuable than those measly Hyatt points. It's as clear as a crystal chandelier that Hilton Honors reigns supreme, standing head and shoulders above any other hotel loyalty program out there.

    In my esteemed opinion, I would dare to place World of Hyatt in a pitiful fifth position.
    Yes, you heard me right—after HHonors, then...

    Not suprising from Hyatt. Hyatt fanboys do not realize that Hilton points are a whopping 5 to 6 times more valuable than those measly Hyatt points. It's as clear as a crystal chandelier that Hilton Honors reigns supreme, standing head and shoulders above any other hotel loyalty program out there.

    In my esteemed opinion, I would dare to place World of Hyatt in a pitiful fifth position.
    Yes, you heard me right—after HHonors, then Marriott, followed by Choice and Wyndham.
    Being the undisputed authority in the Hilton program, it's quite obvious that I know exactly what I'm talking about.

    I have generously adorned every single one of my social media profile pictures with a screenshot of my illustrious LIFETIME DIAMOND status. That means: No expiration and no requalification required. Brace yourselves, mortals,friends and allow the overwhelming brilliance of my accomplishment to wash over you.

    G'day.

    1. Stanley Guest

      Hilarious. Beware the Hilton fan boy in chief, aka DCS, will think you are making fun of him... although you perfectly captured his personality

    2. BobNL Guest

      This DCS dude has been a nuisance for years... always thinking he knows the best

  8. DCS Diamond

    For years, this site has published numerical>/b> "values" of hotels, airlines and credit cards points currencies. The basis of the numerical values is apparently the following set of axioms

    -- How to go about valuing miles & points
    -- Miles & points can’t be valued objectively
    -- Be conservative when valuing miles & points
    -- Valuing miles & points is both absolute & relative
    -- How you’ll get the most...

    For years, this site has published numerical>/b> "values" of hotels, airlines and credit cards points currencies. The basis of the numerical values is apparently the following set of axioms

    -- How to go about valuing miles & points
    -- Miles & points can’t be valued objectively
    -- Be conservative when valuing miles & points
    -- Valuing miles & points is both absolute & relative
    -- How you’ll get the most value with your miles & points
    -- Don’t fall for the retail cost fallacy
    -- Don’t value miles & points based on one redemption

    I have a question for which there is probably an obvious answer but I just can't see it.

    Let's say I want to come up with my own valuations. How would I go from the set of axioms to numerical values of points or miles, like this site apparently does? How do I come up with 0.7cpp for a BonVoy point or 0.3cpp for a Radisson Rewards (America) point?

    [E]nquiring minds wanna know!

    1. DCS Diamond

      Yup, him, "the caped crusader", again...asking on your behalf questions that you are too stupid to think of.,.

    2. BobNL Guest

      This DCS dude has been a nuisance/ pain in the a** for years. His arrogance is really annoying

    3. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ DCS -- You can just make up your own valuations, no one is stopping you. I don't think you really need help with figuring out how. I mean, you make up your own interpretation of Hilton Honors' terms & conditions on a daily basis. Use that for inspiration.

    4. DCS Diamond

      @ DCS -- You can just make up your own valuations, no one is stopping you. I don't think you really need help with figuring out how. I mean, you make up your own interpretation of Hilton Honors' terms & conditions on a daily basis. Use that for inspiration.

      @Ben, sure, anyone can make up (keyword) their own, but then how useful would such numbers be and why even bother publishing them if...

      @ DCS -- You can just make up your own valuations, no one is stopping you. I don't think you really need help with figuring out how. I mean, you make up your own interpretation of Hilton Honors' terms & conditions on a daily basis. Use that for inspiration.

      @Ben, sure, anyone can make up (keyword) their own, but then how useful would such numbers be and why even bother publishing them if they can simply be plucked out of thin air? It seems like a futile exercise, no? However, that is not even the question I asked and you know it.

      Once more: How does your set of axioms translate to the numbers that you publish?

      Also, please do not digress by claiming that I make up my own interpretation of Hilton Honors' terms and conditions on a daily because my question would be: provide one example. But. I won't let you off the hook this time. You can provide an example later or even write a whole post full of examples later and we'll dive into it. For now the question is:

      How does your set of axioms translate to the numbers that you publish?

      Importantly, you said that

      [I] can just make up [my] own valuations, no one is stopping [me]

      But that is exactly the point: I could make up numbers but I do not precisely because then my numbers would be as useless as your are and have always been. That is why I showed in this very space how I analytically calculate values of the points currencies of all the major hotel loyalty programs, quite accurately, based on having a full understanding of what the numbers mean. I will do so again depending on how this progresses...

      The question of the day is: How does your set of axioms translate to the numbers that you publish?

    5. BenjaminGuttery Diamond

      DCS: I'm really Kool + Smart because I can type alot on others blogs in italics and bold letters, (that means I'm right about everything).

    6. Lady London Guest

      DCS does not realize how few people agree with the nonsense he's been writing for years.
      This had the audacity to claim that Hilton programme is superior to Hyatt

    7. Lady London Guest

      What an annoying fool!

  9. Never In Doubt Guest

    How can transferable points be worth 1.7¢, when every individual program “point/mile” you can transfer them to is worth less than 1.7¢?

    Is that all due to occasional transfer bonuses? If so, that should be explicitly stated. If not, you’ve got got a huge logic disconnect.

    1. Hammerofguam New Member

      He said in the article that he gives more value because of the flexibility of those points, and the ability to work around devaluations.

    2. Never In Doubt Guest

      That makes no sense.

    3. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ Never In Doubt -- It's due to two factors.

      First of all, as you mention, there are transfer bonuses, and those factor into the valuation of points.

      The second reason is because I value the flexibility of transferable points currencies. My valuation of any individual currency isn't intended to reflect the absolute maximum value you can get from that current, but rather is supposed to reflect a fair value you can expect to...

      @ Never In Doubt -- It's due to two factors.

      First of all, as you mention, there are transfer bonuses, and those factor into the valuation of points.

      The second reason is because I value the flexibility of transferable points currencies. My valuation of any individual currency isn't intended to reflect the absolute maximum value you can get from that current, but rather is supposed to reflect a fair value you can expect to get, while considering the risk. Transferable points are a lot less risky.

      Some might say that a transferable points currency can't be worth more than any individual currency, but I disagree. That would be true if you could actually exchange points between currencies freely, but that's not possible. But another way, let's say you valued Chase points at 1.5 cents each, and that was the same amount you valued World of Hyatt points. Presumably you'd still prefer to have Chase points rather than Hyatt points, given the additional flexibility. My valuation is intended to reflect that.

    4. Never In Doubt Guest

      Ben, nothing you wrote (except re: transfer bonuses) makes any sense why transferable points are worth so much more than ALL individual program points.

      Again, you’ve got a logical disconnect.

    5. BenjaminGuttery Diamond

      NID, it's clearly his opinion. If it offends you so much, then don't read his blob. Either that ot use your own/someone else's valuation. So ridiculous that grown adults spend so much time whining in the comments here.

    6. Zzz Guest

      The idea is that with a menu of transfer options available as in the case of UR or MR, one will be able to select only above average redemptions. This biases redemption values for flexible points upward above the individual program averages.

  10. Emme Guest

    Hyatt points at 0.3 cents/point must be an error.

    1. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ Emme -- If you're viewing the chart on mobile, it might not be very intuitive. It lists the program and then the amount, so World of Hyatt points are valued at 1.5 cents each. The 0.3 cent valuation is for Radisson Rewards points.

    2. Gregillinois Guest

      United 1.4 after huge devaluation? They should be boycotted until they moderate a 30% increase. Most travelers can not plan a big trip and hope for a mythical flash sale. Hopefully Chase will feel consumer pressure.

    3. BenjaminGuttery Diamond

      Are You looking at this on a mobile phone? United is at 1.1 Cents Per Mile. Several readers have looked at the wrong column on a cell phone.

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Ben Schlappig OMAAT

@ DCS -- You can just make up your own valuations, no one is stopping you. I don't think you really need help with figuring out how. I mean, you make up your own interpretation of Hilton Honors' terms & conditions on a daily basis. Use that for inspiration.

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Lady London Guest

Oh my god. Not him again

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Zzz Guest

The idea is that with a menu of transfer options available as in the case of UR or MR, one will be able to select only above average redemptions. This biases redemption values for flexible points upward above the individual program averages.

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Meet Ben Schlappig, OMAAT Founder
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