How To Redeem Hilton Honors Points For Best Value

How To Redeem Hilton Honors Points For Best Value

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I write a lot about the value of hotel loyalty programs, and in this post I wanted to specifically look at the best ways to go about redeeming Hilton Honors points, and how I use my points. Just as I wrote guides to redeeming Marriott Bonvoy points and World of Hyatt points, in this post I wanted to share strategies for redeeming Hilton Honors points for maximum value.

Basics of redeeming Hilton Honors points

Let’s start by talking about the basics of redeeming Hilton Honors points — how much should you expect to pay for free nights, are there blackout dates, how much are Hilton Honors points worth, etc.?

I value Hilton Honors points at 0.5 cents each

Personally I value Hilton Honors points at 0.5 cents each. There’s no science to that, but rather I think that’s a fair, conservative valuation for what the points are worth. In other words, I won’t redeem points for a hotel stay with Hilton unless I’m getting well over 0.5 cents of value per point.

It’s important to come up with a points valuation for yourself (it can be different than mine), so that you can decide whether to pay cash or redeem points for a hotel stay.

Waldorf Astoria Amsterdam

Hilton Honors has no blackout dates

Hilton Honors has no blackout dates, which is to say that if a standard room is available for purchase with cash, it can also be booked with points.

Now, the important thing to keep in mind is that some hotels have a very small pool of “standard” rooms, and a vast majority of rooms at a hotel may be considered “premium.” If a hotel has 150 rooms, it’s possible that only 10 rooms are considered “standard,” so that’s the major issue you’ll run into when redeeming points at some properties.

Free night awards cost 5,000-150,000 points per night

Hilton Honors doesn’t publish an award chart, but rather has dynamic award pricing. That’s to say that the cost of a free night redemption can vary based on the cash cost of a stay.

However, there are limits to Hilton Honors’ award pricing for standard rooms. Across the Hilton Honors portfolio, standard room redemptions cost a minimum of 5,000 points and a maximum of 150,000 points per night.

Each individual hotel has an (unpublished) maximum of how many points a standard room will cost. There are only a couple of properties that will cost up to 150,000 points, while all other properties will cost significantly less than that.

This is important to understand, because a hotel could be charging the same number of points on two nights, even if one night costs $200 if paying cash, while the other night costs $400 if paying cash.

Waldorf Astoria Los Cabos Pedregal

Standard room rewards vs. premium room rewards

When you search award availability, you may notice that some awards are labeled as a “Standard Room Reward,” while others are labeled as a “Premium Room Reward.” What’s the difference? Standard room rewards are for situations where a standard room is available for sale, while premium room rewards allow you to redeem points for any type of hotel room, though generally the value won’t be as good.

If you see pricing at a hotel that’s above the typical maximum for a property, that means there’s no a standard room available, and you’re booking a premium award. Take the below example for the Waldorf Astoria Maldives, where a standard room is available for 150,000 points, while a premium room costs a minimum of 1,125,000 points — that’s quite a difference!

Hilton has “standard” and “premium” awards

Hilton Points & Money awards aren’t a great deal

Hilton Honors offers Points & Money awards, whereby you can book a stay at a hotel using a combination of points and cash. This might sound appealing to those who want to reduce the cash cost of a stay using points, or those who don’t have quite enough points for a stay.

Generally speaking, Hilton Points & Money isn’t a great use of points, and you’re going to get a better value booking a free night award stay outright. For example, take the Waldorf Astoria Maldives, where a free night costs 150,000 Hilton Honors points.

Hilton Honors Points & Money awards

Want to book a Points & Money award instead? If you wanted to reduce the points requirement by half (75,000 points), you’d need to pay a total of $1,050.12. As a point of comparison, I value Hilton Honors points at 0.5 cents each, meaning those 75,000 Hilton Honors points are worth $375 to me. But here you’re being asked to pay nearly three times that much.

Hilton Honors Points & Money awards

Hilton Honors elite members get a fifth night free

One way to maximize Hilton Honors points is to stay in increments of five nights. All Hilton Honors elite members (including Silver, Gold, and Diamond members) receive a fifth night free on award stays. There needs to be award availability for five consecutive nights, and then you’ll only pay for four of those nights.

You can use this an unlimited number of times, and even for back-to-back stays. However, you must be paying for all nights with points out of the same account.

Katara Hills Doha, Hilton LXR

Hilton Honors elite status is easy to earn

When you redeem points for your hotel stay, you of course want to have as good of an experience as possible. That’s why it’s worth noting that Hilton Honors makes it easier than any other hotel program to earn status with credit cards:

The reason this matters is because having status can get you everything from room upgrades, to complimentary breakfast (or a food & beverage credit), to executive lounge access. The value of that will add up quickly.

The information and associated card details on this page for the Hilton Honors American Express Aspire Card has been collected independently by OMAAT and has not been reviewed or provided by the card issuer.

Complimentary breakfast can add a lot of value to a stay

Pool Hilton Honors points to maximize value

Among hotel loyalty programs, Hilton Honors arguably has the most generous policy for combining points between accounts. Hilton Honors lets you pool points with others at no cost, which is awesome in situations where that could allow you to book something you don’t otherwise have enough points for.

There are no resort fees on points stays

Nowadays many properties charge resort fees or destination fees, which are essentially a money-grab. One awesome thing about redeem Hilton Honors points is that you’re not on the hook for those fees when you’re redeeming points for your stay, rather than paying cash. This applies regardless of whether or not you have elite status.

Hilton Honors often sells points for 0.5 cents each

Hilton Honors frequently has promotions for purchasing points, and the program frequently sells points with a 100% bonus, which is a cost of 0.5 cents per point. That’s right around what I value the points.

The reason this matters is because there are lots of situations where you could get outsized value simply by buying points from Hilton and then immediately redeeming them for a hotel stay. Personally I think it’s worth having a reserve of Hilton Honors points when a situation like that arises.

Waldorf Astoria Dubai DIFC

The best uses of Hilton Honors points

With the above basics out of the way about redeeming Hilton Honors points, how do you get the most value with your points? Below is my approach to redeeming Hilton Honors points for maximum value.

Standard room free night awards get you the most value

Personally, I exclusively redeem Hilton Honors points for free night awards in standard rooms. I don’t use Hilton Honors points for premium awards, or for merchandise, or for Points & Money awards. I consistently get way more than 0.5 cents of value per point when redeeming for standard room free night awards, while I find most other redemptions don’t offer that level of value.

Conrad Bora Bora

Crunch the numbers on each redemption

Even though Hilton Honors has dynamic award pricing, that doesn’t mean every redemption is created equal. With each redemption you’ll want to crunch the numbers, and in general you’ll get the most value when you can find a standard room that’s available over a busier period.

For example, say you want to stay at The Gabriel Miami Downtown, a Curio Collection by Hilton property. I just pulled up the calendar availability for later this year. Nearly every night has redemptions available for 70,000 Hilton Honors points. As mentioned above, I value Hilton points at 0.5 cents each, so to me that’s the equivalent of “paying” $350 for a night.

Hilton Honors award calendar

Want to pay cash for your stay instead? Over the course of the month, rates vary from $298 to $798. Yet when paying points, you’d pay the same no matter what. In other words, the value you’ll get per point ranges from 0.43 cents to 1.14 cents — that’s a massive difference!

Hilton Honors revenue stay calendar

Similarly, points pricing between hotels isn’t always logical. Let’s use two hotels in Turkey as an example. The Hampton by Hilton Bolu costs 5,000 Hilton Honors points or $80 per night, giving you a redemption value of 1.6 cents per Hilton Honors point.

Hilton Honors award pricing

Meanwhile the Hilton Garden Inn Erzurum cost 12,000 Hilton Honors points or $41 per night, giving you a redemption value of 0.34 cents per Hilton Honors point.

Hilton Honors award pricing

I can’t understate enough how just crunching the numbers and doing some comparison shopping can stretch your points further.

Redeem at Hilton’s best hotels for maximum value

While you can get great value with Hilton Honors points with a bit of effort at your typical four star hotel, the area where Hilton Honors really shines is when it comes to luxury hotels, as that’s where you’ll get the most value for your points.

Let me give some examples of hotels that I’ve redeemed at, and the maximum you’d pay for a standard room free night award:

Given that you can acquire Hilton Honors points for 0.5 cents each, those are some potentially amazing values. For example, redeeming just 150,000 Hilton Honors points per night at the Waldorf Astoria Maldives, when cash rates would be $2,000+ including taxes & fees, is an awesome opportunity.

That’s a great use of points!

The challenge is that award availability at these top properties can be really limited. That’s because each of these hotels only categorizes a limited number of rooms as “standard” accommodations, so the pool of rooms bookable with points is limited.

This is a case where persistence most definitely pays off, though. Either book right when availability opens, or keep checking back as the stay date approaches, as more rooms often become available closer to arrival.

Waldorf Astoria Beverly Hills

Bottom line

Hilton Honors is a pretty easy-to-use points program, and there are many great uses of the points. If you want to maximize your points, make sure you redeem for a standard free night award, which will stretch your points furthest. I value Hilton Honors points at 0.5 cents each, and recommend trying to get way more value out of your points than that.

Personally my favorite use of Hilton Honors points is for stays at Hilton’s top luxury hotels, where you’ll almost consistently get the best value, assuming you can find award availability.

What has your experience been with redeeming Hilton Honors points?

Conversations (24)
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  1. Randy Guest

    Although it was not said in the Gabriel points to cash comparison you note that 14 nights of the month show the cost per night in cash was less than the point value of $350 so you would not use the pints for those nights

  2. Francesco Guest

    I recently stayed at Waldorf Astoria Los Cabos Pedregal 5 nights for 480k HH points, 120k per night + free fifth night as a Gold Member. I had complimentary upgrade from king room to 3 bedroom oceanview villa, monetary value 5k$ per night, plus free complimentary breakfast for me and additional guest (35$ each x 5 days total 350$).
    Total $ room cost 25k$, HH points spent 480k, more than 5 cents value per point obtained.
    This was a fantastic opportunity

  3. DCS Diamond

    Hilton Honors has no blackout dates, which is to say that if a standard room is available for purchase with cash, it can also be booked with points.

    While it is true that Hilton Honors has no "black out dates", that does not at all mean that "if a standard room is available for purchase with cash, it can also be booked with points."

    "Blackout dates" simply refers to specific dates, like New Year's...

    Hilton Honors has no blackout dates, which is to say that if a standard room is available for purchase with cash, it can also be booked with points.

    While it is true that Hilton Honors has no "black out dates", that does not at all mean that "if a standard room is available for purchase with cash, it can also be booked with points."

    "Blackout dates" simply refers to specific dates, like New Year's Eve, during which a hotel would generally put on hold award bookings, discounts or promotions due, e.g., to a high demand. Therefore, what "no blackout dates" means is that a hotel or program allows awards to be booked on any dates, provided, of course, that standard rooms that it wants members to redeem points for remain available. It does not at all mean that "if a standard room is available for purchase with cash, it can also be booked with points", because that is correctly referred to "no capacity controls" rather than "no blackout dates".

    It's the dates that are not blacked out, not the availability of standard awards. The difference is not even that subtle, so I fail to understand why the confusion persists!

  4. Greg Guest

    The Conrad Tokyo is a nice hotel and a good option for reward travel at 95k / night.

  5. DCS Diamond

    Do you want to learn something really cool about the values of hotel loyalty points currencies? Then read the following...

    Personally I value Hilton Honors points at 0.5 cents each. There’s no science to that, but rather I think that’s a fair, conservative valuation for what the points are worth. In other words, I won’t redeem points for a hotel stay with Hilton unless I’m getting well over 0.5 cents of value per point.

    --...

    Do you want to learn something really cool about the values of hotel loyalty points currencies? Then read the following...

    Personally I value Hilton Honors points at 0.5 cents each. There’s no science to that, but rather I think that’s a fair, conservative valuation for what the points are worth. In other words, I won’t redeem points for a hotel stay with Hilton unless I’m getting well over 0.5 cents of value per point.

    -- Ben Schlappig

    Well, actually, Ben, there is real science to it. You just aren't aware of it. However, you do get one thing intuitively or accidentally right when you assume the value of some hotel points, like Hilton Honors', to be around the cost of those points when a program sells them with a 100% discount.

    Here's the proof

    The cost of Hilton points when sold with a 100% discount: ¢0.5
    The cost of IHG points when sold with a 100% discount: ¢0.5
    The cost of Radisson (America) points when sold with s 100% discount: ¢0.4
    I have not seen Marriott points sold with a 100% discount, but they have been sold at enough different percent discounts to enable one to do a regression that yields what the cost of Marriott points would be if sole with a 100% discount: ¢0.7

    Now, here's the science.

    As I previously stated, based my extensive modeling, hotel loyalty points currencies can be calculated analytically using the equation:

    Point Value = 16.0/BER

    where "BER" is the base earn rate of top elites in each program, with bonus points from comparable co-branded CCs included.

    Now, let's see how my analytically calculated values compare with the costs of corresponding points when sold with a 100% discount:

    Hilton Honors
    Base Earn Rate (BER): 32x
    Calculated point value: 16.0/32 = ¢0.50
    Cost of points with 100% discount: ¢0.50

    IHG One
    Base Earn Rate (BER): 30x
    Calculated point value: 16.0/30 = ¢0.53
    Cost of points with 100% discount: ¢0.50

    Radisson Rewards (America)
    Base Earn Rate (BER): 45x
    Calculated point value: 16.0/45 = ¢0.36
    Cost of points with 100% discount: ¢0.4

    Marriott Bonvoy
    Base Earn Rate (BER): 23.5x
    Calculated point value: 16.0/23.5 = ¢0.68
    Extrapolated cost of points with 100% discount: ¢0.7

    Round up or down my exactly and accurately calculated points values and they are an exact match to the cost of corresponding points when sold with a 100% discount. Q.E.D.

    Like I said, Ben, there is science to it. You just aren't aware of it. However, you do such a good job guessing that your valuations of hotel points are the best that I have seen on any site. :-)

    See that? Not only have I explained better than you could how you come up with your values of hotel points currencies, but I have also validated your "methodology", even though it is just guesswork! Can you now redo you points valuation blog post and delete all the bogus axioms?

    G'day.

    1. AD Diamond

      Wow, @DCS, it must be exhausting to smarter than everyone else you ever meet. Especially since you spend so much time making sure everyone knows it.

    2. Origami Guest

      He'll keep posting and reposting what everybody else in the points world figured out (by just looking at redemptions) until we all acknowledge how incredibly brilliant he is.

    3. DCS Diamond

      He'll keep posting and reposting what everybody else in the points world figured out (by just looking at redemptions) until we all acknowledge how incredibly brilliant he is.

      LOL. The last time I checked, everyone was running around touting the Starpoint and then the Hyatt point as the "single most valuable hotel points currency". Is that "what everybody else in the points world figured out (by just looking at redemptions)".

      Anyway, show me where...

      He'll keep posting and reposting what everybody else in the points world figured out (by just looking at redemptions) until we all acknowledge how incredibly brilliant he is.

      LOL. The last time I checked, everyone was running around touting the Starpoint and then the Hyatt point as the "single most valuable hotel points currency". Is that "what everybody else in the points world figured out (by just looking at redemptions)".

      Anyway, show me where anyone has ever published what I posted here and I will see to it that you get a $1,000 reward for being the only person to have figured out what everyone has been getting wrong since the dawn of loyalty. Because you won't be able to, will you "acknowledge how incredibly brilliant [I am]"? I did not think so. How about you get lost?

    4. DCS Diamond

      @AD - Your clear inferiority complex notwithstanding, your comment is so stupid that there is little doubt that the didactic and informational value of what I wrote just went by you, entering one ear and coming out of the other without encountering anything.

      Why do people like you even bother coming here? Seriously, I really would like to know because your getting personal in response to an informative comment that should not at all...

      @AD - Your clear inferiority complex notwithstanding, your comment is so stupid that there is little doubt that the didactic and informational value of what I wrote just went by you, entering one ear and coming out of the other without encountering anything.

      Why do people like you even bother coming here? Seriously, I really would like to know because your getting personal in response to an informative comment that should not at all be controversial is truly flabbergasting.

      BTW, yes, it is exhausting to [be] smarter than everyone else I ever meet in this space who sounds like you.

      Have a nice life.

    5. AD Diamond

      What is controversial about your post is that you insulted the guy who runs the blog along with everyone else who ever posts anything that disagrees with you. Feel free to think that you're smarter than all of us. Feel free to call us stupid. I for one, and I'd guess, most of the rest of the people here don't tie our self-worth to how we're perceived on the blog. The rest of us don't...

      What is controversial about your post is that you insulted the guy who runs the blog along with everyone else who ever posts anything that disagrees with you. Feel free to think that you're smarter than all of us. Feel free to call us stupid. I for one, and I'd guess, most of the rest of the people here don't tie our self-worth to how we're perceived on the blog. The rest of us don't feel the need to prove our intelligence on a blog. So, who, exactly, has the inferiority complex?

      Speaking only for myself now... why bother responding to you? Occasionally I get tired of your self-aggrandizing diarrhea of the mouth and say something.

      Like I said, it must be exhausting to have to prove how smart you are at length. I guess you really don't have anything better to do. But I do. Now I will go back to my regularly scheduled life while you continue to post multipage rants. Have fun!

    6. DCS Guest

      Wonderful. You address me first, disparage me, and then accuse me of the same offense? Well, there is a name for it. It is called "projecting". Rather than "projecting", how about ignoring me and letting anyone I "insult", including the forum host who I have been locking horns with since 2014, speak for themselves? No one appointed you to be their champion, and nothing in your comments so far suggests that you have what it...

      Wonderful. You address me first, disparage me, and then accuse me of the same offense? Well, there is a name for it. It is called "projecting". Rather than "projecting", how about ignoring me and letting anyone I "insult", including the forum host who I have been locking horns with since 2014, speak for themselves? No one appointed you to be their champion, and nothing in your comments so far suggests that you have what it takes to be anyone's "caped crusader".

      What would be useful in a situation like this would be for the site to implement the option to turn off commenters that one is not interested to interact with because I would've turned you off from your very first
      comment. Have a nice life, totally free of the "ravages" of intelligence...

    7. Pam Guest

      Great article and very informative. I have had a Hilton Honors American Express card (no annual fee) since 1998. We have enjoyed so many free nights, usually on road trips. And they definitely are free, as we pay off our credit card each month. One of the most enjoyable stays was at The Hilton, Clearwater Beach. In all these years, though, I have yet to stay anyplace a full five nights (getting the fifth night free). I think I will focus on that for our next trip.

  6. beachmouse Member

    We live at the beach so go to the mountains for vacation. Summer 2023 we did five nights at Homewood Suites-Jackson Hole, Wyoming to see Grand Tetons National Park. Silver Elite because of the no annual fee AmEx Hilton card, so 320K points for a five night stay when the cash rate was $800/night, giving us more than a penny a point redemption value. Decent hotel options near popular US National Parks tend to be...

    We live at the beach so go to the mountains for vacation. Summer 2023 we did five nights at Homewood Suites-Jackson Hole, Wyoming to see Grand Tetons National Park. Silver Elite because of the no annual fee AmEx Hilton card, so 320K points for a five night stay when the cash rate was $800/night, giving us more than a penny a point redemption value. Decent hotel options near popular US National Parks tend to be pretty expensive these days, with Jackson being on the high side even for that.

  7. LMT Guest

    The lowest for WA Los Cabos is 120,000 for a standard room, not 150,000 as mentioned in your article.

  8. SSS Guest

    @Ben what do you feel a great redemption is? 1.5 cents value, 2 cents? And what’s the best redemption you’ve gotten?

    1. Never In Doubt Guest

      You can buy Hilton points 330 days a year for 0.5¢.

      Anything above 0.5¢ is great.

    2. SSS Guest

      Agree anything above 0.5 cents is valuable. What I’m keen to understand is what are best / better redemption rates….

    3. DCS Diamond

      And the answer is...a good Hilton redemption is one that gets at least ¢0.5/HH point, which is equivalent to getting 1.5/WoH point.

      When a location is of great interest to me, I may dip as low as ¢0.4/HH. For anything below ¢0.4/HH I will pay cash.

      What I’m keen to understand is what are best / better redemption rates….

      - SSS

      Better HH redemption values are …..¢75-¢1.0/HH, which one gets easily on 5-night award...

      And the answer is...a good Hilton redemption is one that gets at least ¢0.5/HH point, which is equivalent to getting 1.5/WoH point.

      When a location is of great interest to me, I may dip as low as ¢0.4/HH. For anything below ¢0.4/HH I will pay cash.

      What I’m keen to understand is what are best / better redemption rates….

      - SSS

      Better HH redemption values are …..¢75-¢1.0/HH, which one gets easily on 5-night award stays with 5th night free. At uber-aspirational locations like the Maldives, at least ¢2.0/HH is common.

    4. DCS Diamond

      Better HH redemption values are …..¢0.75-¢1.0/HH and not ¢75-¢1.0/HH !

    5. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ SSS -- Usually my goal is to redeem for over 1.0 cents per point compared to the cash cost. Any time I can get that kind of value, I redeem. That means you're coming out way ahead, even after factoring in the points you're forgoing by not booking a revenue rate.

      My best redemption? Compared to the cash cost, it has to be the Waldorf Astoria Los Cabos or Waldorf Astoria Maldives, where I get well over 1.5 cents of value per point.

    6. DCS Diamond

      ...even after factoring in the points you're forgoing by not booking a revenue rate.

      That makes no sense at all. The fact that you earned the points by paying cash for "something", incluing for revenue stays, already takes into account "the points you're forgoing now by not booking a revenue rate".

      No need to "penalize" oneself twice for the cost of earning points! The redemption value of an award stay is simply what the...

      ...even after factoring in the points you're forgoing by not booking a revenue rate.

      That makes no sense at all. The fact that you earned the points by paying cash for "something", incluing for revenue stays, already takes into account "the points you're forgoing now by not booking a revenue rate".

      No need to "penalize" oneself twice for the cost of earning points! The redemption value of an award stay is simply what the cost in cash of the room, including taxes and fees, would be divided by the cost in points of the same room, irrespective of the source(s) of points, which can be so may that the "penalty" for points one is foregoing every time one books an award stay can become circular or intractable.

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DCS Diamond

<b>Do you want to learn something really cool about the values of hotel loyalty points currencies? Then read the following...</b> <blockquote>Personally I value Hilton Honors points at 0.5 cents each. <b>There’s no science to that</b>, but rather I think that’s a fair, conservative valuation for what the points are worth. In other words, I won’t redeem points for a hotel stay with Hilton unless I’m getting well over 0.5 cents of value per point. -- Ben Schlappig </blockquote> Well, actually, Ben, there is real <b>science</b> to it. You just aren't aware of it. However, you do get one thing <b>intuitively<b> or <b>accidentally</b> right when you assume the value of some hotel points, like Hilton Honors', to be around the cost of those points when a program sells them with a 100% discount. <b>Here's the proof</b> The cost of Hilton points when sold with a 100% discount: <b>¢0.5</b> The cost of IHG points when sold with a 100% discount: <b>¢0.5</b> The cost of Radisson (America) points when sold with s 100% discount: <b>¢0.4</b> I have not seen Marriott points sold with a 100% discount, but they have been sold at enough different percent discounts to enable one to do a regression that yields what the cost of Marriott points would be if sole with a 100% discount: <b>¢0.7</b> Now, here's the <b>science</b>. As I previously stated, based my extensive modeling, <b>hotel</b> loyalty points currencies can be calculated <b>analytically</b> using the equation: Point Value = 16.0/BER where "BER" is the <i>base earn rate</i> of top elites in each program, with bonus points from comparable co-branded CCs included. Now, let's see how my <b>analytically</b> calculated values compare with the costs of corresponding points when sold with a 100% discount: Hilton Honors Base Earn Rate (BER): 32x Calculated point value: 16.0/32 = ¢0.50 Cost of points with 100% discount: ¢0.50 IHG One Base Earn Rate (BER): 30x Calculated point value: 16.0/30 = ¢0.53 Cost of points with 100% discount: ¢0.50 Radisson Rewards (America) Base Earn Rate (BER): 45x Calculated point value: 16.0/45 = ¢0.36 Cost of points with 100% discount: ¢0.4 Marriott Bonvoy Base Earn Rate (BER): 23.5x Calculated point value: 16.0/23.5 = ¢0.68 <b>Extrapolated</b> cost of points with 100% discount: ¢0.7 Round up or down my exactly and accurately calculated points values and <b>they are an exact match</b> to the cost of corresponding points when sold with a 100% discount. <b>Q.E.D.</b> Like I said, Ben, there is <b>science</b> to it. You just aren't aware of it. However, you do such a good job guessing that your valuations of hotel points are the <b>best</b> that I have seen on any site. :-) See that? Not only have I explained better than you could how you come up with your values of hotel points currencies, but I have also validated your "methodology", even though it is just <b>guesswork</b>! Can you now redo you points valuation blog post and delete all the bogus <b>axioms</b>? G'day.

1
DCS Guest

Wonderful. You address me first, disparage me, and then accuse me of the same offense? Well, there is a name for it. It is called "projecting". Rather than "projecting", how about ignoring me and letting anyone I "insult", including the forum host who I have been locking horns with since 2014, speak for themselves? No one appointed you to be their champion, and nothing in your comments so far suggests that you have what it takes to be anyone's "caped crusader". What would be useful in a situation like this would be for the site to implement the option to turn off commenters that one is not interested to interact with because I would've turned you off from your very first comment. Have a nice life, totally free of the "ravages" of intelligence...

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AD Diamond

What is controversial about your post is that you insulted the guy who runs the blog along with everyone else who ever posts anything that disagrees with you. Feel free to think that you're smarter than all of us. Feel free to call us stupid. I for one, and I'd guess, most of the rest of the people here don't tie our self-worth to how we're perceived on the blog. The rest of us don't feel the need to prove our intelligence on a blog. So, who, exactly, has the inferiority complex? Speaking only for myself now... why bother responding to you? Occasionally I get tired of your self-aggrandizing diarrhea of the mouth and say something. Like I said, it must be exhausting to have to prove how smart you are at length. I guess you really don't have anything better to do. But I do. Now I will go back to my regularly scheduled life while you continue to post multipage rants. Have fun!

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Meet Ben Schlappig, OMAAT Founder
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