Report: Airbus Cancels Qatar Airways’ A350 Order

Report: Airbus Cancels Qatar Airways’ A350 Order

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The writing was on the wall, but it looks like it has finally happened?

Airbus cancels Qatar Airways A350 order

Reuters is reporting that Airbus has revoked its entire outstanding Airbus A350 order with Qatar Airways. Neither company has officially commented, but Reuters references two industry sources.

This is connected to the major legal dispute that the two companies are engaged in, regarding the condition of Airbus A350s. Qatar Airways claims the fuselage of the aircraft is degrading at an accelerated rate, while Airbus is claiming that the damage is cosmetic.

Qatar Airways has refused to take delivery of any more A350s until the issue is resolved, as the Qatari aviation regulator has grounded these jets. Meanwhile Airbus isn’t really acknowledging the issues, and claims that Qatar Airways’ unwillingness to take delivery of these jets means it can cancel its contract.

Qatar Airways was supposed to have a fleet of 74 Airbus A350s, including 34 A350-900s and 40 A350-1000s. Of those, 21 A350-1000 orders are still outstanding, and it sounds like these won’t be delivered to the airline. Presumably Airbus plans to pursue reselling these jets, and there are quite a few airlines that are interested (including Air India, potentially).

Keep in mind that Qatar Airways also had an order for 50 Airbus A321neo family aircraft, and Airbus canceled that order earlier this year. Qatar Airways tried to stop Airbus from being able to resell these jets, but a judge in the UK ruled that the aircraft manufacturer was within its rights.

Qatar Airways’ order for 21 A350s has allegedly been canceled

Will Qatar Airways be an all-Boeing customer?

With Airbus having allegedly canceled all of Qatar Airways’ outstanding orders, and with international aircraft manufacturing largely being a duopoly, that means Qatar Airways is more or less committed to Boeing. Of course it’s possible that relations between Qatar Airways and Airbus improve over time, but things aren’t looking good at this very moment.

Qatar Airways has been growing at an incredible pace, and admittedly Qatar Airways’ future aircraft deliveries being canceled will be bad news for that.

As things currently stand:

Fortunately deliveries of the Boeing 787 can be continued shortly (after an extended suspension due to production issues), so Qatar Airways should be able to take delivery of those planes soon.

However, the other two planes are much more challenging. The Boeing 737 MAX 10 hasn’t been certified, and Boeing is even threatening to cancel the jet. Meanwhile the Boeing 777-9 was initially supposed to enter service as of 2020, but is now delayed until 2025 at the earliest.

Given Boeing’s issue with actually delivering planes, this isn’t a great spot to be in.

Qatar Airways has 737 MAXs on order

Bottom line

It’s being reported that Airbus has canceled Qatar Airways’ remaining outstanding A350 order, meaning the Qatari national carrier no longer has any orders with Airbus. At this point Qatar Airways seems to be fully committed to Boeing, which isn’t ideal, given the current state of the 737 MAX 10 and 777-9. I wonder if we’ll see Qatar Airways up its order with Boeing.

What do you make of Airbus canceling Qatar Airways’ A350 order, and the implications of this?

Conversations (49)
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  1. Max Guest

    It's high time, monopoly of Airbus should end.
    Qatar should start making its own Aircrafts.

    Customer is king, QA was right when it raised the complaint.

  2. James Brown Guest

    Airbus well within their rights. QA laid off engineers pilots and cabin crew during the pandemic. So the aircrafts they grounded wouldn’t have flown anyway. They saw an opportunity to fleece Airbus and they took it. They didn’t count on Airbus standing up to them. Hubris. Qatar claims they didn’t ground the aircraft but their regulator did. Everyone in The industry knows the regulator is a “division” of Qatar. All Airbus has to do is...

    Airbus well within their rights. QA laid off engineers pilots and cabin crew during the pandemic. So the aircrafts they grounded wouldn’t have flown anyway. They saw an opportunity to fleece Airbus and they took it. They didn’t count on Airbus standing up to them. Hubris. Qatar claims they didn’t ground the aircraft but their regulator did. Everyone in The industry knows the regulator is a “division” of Qatar. All Airbus has to do is prove that the regulator was “instructed” to ground the aircraft and it is check Mate. Game over. Repercussions. No oversight. All Airbus has to do is subpoena QA staff pilots engineers and the story will be told.

    1. Muhammad Guest

      That's utter nonsense. They made the biggest profit ever in 2021, so that claim has no basis. Try again.

  3. iamhere Guest

    If you no longer have the contract then you can resell the product as the product will be produced. Basic business.

  4. Ivan Guest

    Karma happened to Qatar Airways and they’re now getting some of their own medicine, which is amazing! Their crew is treated horribly. I’m mostly referring to the flight attendants - working on minimum crew, working on minimum rest, having a curfew of 4AM when you are in Doha on your off days - yes, you can’t have a night out and come back on the other day like normal people do; can’t even attend your...

    Karma happened to Qatar Airways and they’re now getting some of their own medicine, which is amazing! Their crew is treated horribly. I’m mostly referring to the flight attendants - working on minimum crew, working on minimum rest, having a curfew of 4AM when you are in Doha on your off days - yes, you can’t have a night out and come back on the other day like normal people do; can’t even attend your friends’ birthdays cause you need to plan when exactly to order your taxi so you don't get fired; not being able to go out 12 hours before the pickup time (bus to airport prior to a flight), with only 90 min allowed within the 12 hours to go get food. During the initial (Ab-initio) trainings guys and girls are split into separate classes and they’re not even allowed to speak to each other in the cafeteria. With Qatar Airways you don’t have a job and a life. You get a life about your job because the company is managing you in every aspect of your life. Surveillance cameras are placed at the doors (some buildings even the floors have separate cameras) of your accommodation to see when you go out and come back. And to exit/enter you need to swipe a card so they detect the exact time, and fire you if you came back home 4:01 instead of 03:59. It is however super sad for the people whose lives are totally absorbed by a company that doesn’t give a sh*t about their employees. People in Qatar Airways are just numbers. They have money to buy the awards they like to brag about on social media and contribute to their toxic environment, they sure will have some spare cash for some extra boeings.

    1. Mike Guest

      What happened? they did not give you an Upgrade? I have many friends working for them, They enjoy working for them.By the way, Great Service Qatar.

    2. Ivan Guest

      I was upgraded quite fast - before my second year. It is just wrong in so many ways for them to be so controlling. I LOVED the job, not the company and these are two different things. Your friends are just good people who love to do what they do.

    3. Arun Guest

      Just on seeing money thrown at your face many may be happy but for few who value freedom and liberty it is slavery

    4. red_robbo Guest

      Sorry, Mike, but Ivan is absolutely correct about the strict culture for cabin crew. It has been well documented by former staff.
      So are all of your friends who work there (cabin crew or flight crew? - a big difference between the way the two are treated) denying that all of these rules and restrictions exist?

    5. Dan Guest

      I can tell you first hand, Ivan is talking absolute truth, I worked very close with all of these organizations (16 years) and in the culture of fear and yes men, and idea that money can buy anything, it’s all about control of everything inside and outside the country, well done Airbus, who I know very well, you had the balls to do what Qataris probably are not used to

  5. Joe Guest

    Qatar has the right to complain about paint not sticking and asking for future planes not to have this problem. It is my understanding that Airbus offered a solution but Qatar rejected it and wants money instead and to keep the planes grounded while recording large profits during slow times and with the planes grounded. Airbus point is possibly valid- Qatar possibly keeps the planes grounded during low demand to reduce operational cost and still...

    Qatar has the right to complain about paint not sticking and asking for future planes not to have this problem. It is my understanding that Airbus offered a solution but Qatar rejected it and wants money instead and to keep the planes grounded while recording large profits during slow times and with the planes grounded. Airbus point is possibly valid- Qatar possibly keeps the planes grounded during low demand to reduce operational cost and still make profits. In other words, grounded for business reasons. So both companies are playing games. In the end, Airbus folks have the right to sell its planes to others who truly want the plane and don’t give them headaches. However, they have to fix this composite paint adhesion problem for once and for alll. Unfortunate situation since Qatar is the best airline in the world and the A350 is a magnificent airplane.

    1. Muhammad Guest

      Amazing. You hit the nail on the head. Wonder if your analysis can be picked up and provide you with a consultancy job for airlines. You'd make a killing!

  6. Tim Guest

    One Other Note: No Other Government Aviation Regulatory Authorities Have Come Forward To Support Qatar Airways Malicious Accusations Against Airbus. As A Matter Of Fact, Singapore Airlines reported in a interview a few Months Ago they Have Not Encountered Any Paint or Electrical Mesh Protection Issues. Just Stating the Facts.

    Your Critical Research Criminologist
    and
    African/African American Historian
    Tim W.

  7. Clive Soper Guest

    Qatar, Al Baker appear to be descending towards the core of a black hole. Whilst there are paint issues with other users a more rational resolution to the problem has been adopted. Indeed, think back to the beginning of the Covid crisis, I recall Al Baker telling anyone who would listen that the air-framers would have to delay delivery and reduce costs, it seems they don’t.
    Airbus are confident with the case , their...

    Qatar, Al Baker appear to be descending towards the core of a black hole. Whilst there are paint issues with other users a more rational resolution to the problem has been adopted. Indeed, think back to the beginning of the Covid crisis, I recall Al Baker telling anyone who would listen that the air-framers would have to delay delivery and reduce costs, it seems they don’t.
    Airbus are confident with the case , their legal advisers are confident, unless I’m fundamentally missing something Qatar are creating for themselves an almost impossible stage on which to do business, something has to go pop soon.

  8. Leigh Gold

    It's a shame it's come to this, but seemed inevitable given the hard positions taken on both sides, particularly Qatar/Qatar Civil Aviation Authority.

    As for the 737, just looked at the nearby FlyDubai route network, and the aircraft is capable to fly the targeted routes from Doha that QR would have prioritized with the 321.

    As for the 787, in first appearance it would look like Boeing is in the drivers seat. However, two...

    It's a shame it's come to this, but seemed inevitable given the hard positions taken on both sides, particularly Qatar/Qatar Civil Aviation Authority.

    As for the 737, just looked at the nearby FlyDubai route network, and the aircraft is capable to fly the targeted routes from Doha that QR would have prioritized with the 321.

    As for the 787, in first appearance it would look like Boeing is in the drivers seat. However, two things make me think it's not that clean cut: 1) while being able to generate a premium in the negotiation, it's still in the interest for Boeing to not milk it, and they will accept a small premium for the sake of overall revenue, maximizing QR orders, industry market share and prestige, and 2) as QR has equity in other airlines (BA first comes to mind with 787 commonality), QR does the potential to leverage bulk 787 orders with other partner airlines. Admittedly, just speculation.

    1. Arun Guest

      When regulators become puppet to the very airlines it is supposed to regulate and become a caged parrot such things are bound to happen

  9. Malcolm Guest

    I saw an interview with Bakr on BBC World business today from Farnborough. When asked whether he saw Qatar's future with Boeing or Airbus he answered "Boeing!" and then repeated his allegations against Airbus. You have the feeling we haven't heard the full story. Why he's ripped so publicly into Airbus? Presumably harsh words were exchanged behind the scenes and Airbus decided it was a lost cause and could find other customers to take them....

    I saw an interview with Bakr on BBC World business today from Farnborough. When asked whether he saw Qatar's future with Boeing or Airbus he answered "Boeing!" and then repeated his allegations against Airbus. You have the feeling we haven't heard the full story. Why he's ripped so publicly into Airbus? Presumably harsh words were exchanged behind the scenes and Airbus decided it was a lost cause and could find other customers to take them.

    It takes a lot for an airline to alienate a manufacturer and Bakr doesn't come over as the most diplomatic or tactful person. When asked about Qatar's treatment of migrant workers, he dismissed it as a campaign against Qatar!

    1. Rotuma Member

      In the past he complained vigorously about Boeing, hoping to get some concessions. Apparently the thinking is, “If I loudly complain about your product, you’ll be ashamed and offer me a discount.” He refused to let Cargolux take delivery on time of the new 747-8 freighter years ago. QA was a significant shareholder of Cargolux at the time.

    2. Arun Guest

      Bakr is a cry baby he is cornered now it is all the karma coming back professional MBA in Boeing will milk him now

  10. Hugh Guest

    It is a pity, Qatar is missing out on a great airliner. One would expect this could have been resolved .

  11. Mindshare Guest

    You buy a Tesla...and paint and outer layer cracks.... imagine liability for Tesla in American courts !!!

  12. Andy Diamond

    It seems that Airbus if pretty self-confident winning the court case. Because if it looses, the potential compensation they will have to pay can be enormous. As big that it bankrupts Airbus and the European governments will have to rescue them. This would bring the entire case to a new level, given that the EU governments are asking the State of Qatar to deliver more gas ...

    1. Tim Dunn Diamond

      Airbus has already won the legal case. They do not have to provide aircraft to parties that do not pay for them. Qatar has refused to accept delivery of new aircraft which means that Qatar, not Airbus, breached the contract.
      It is entirely possible that is what Qatar wanted. Airbus will have to figure out how to redeploy aircraft it has built or has committed to build for QR but both parties are better...

      Airbus has already won the legal case. They do not have to provide aircraft to parties that do not pay for them. Qatar has refused to accept delivery of new aircraft which means that Qatar, not Airbus, breached the contract.
      It is entirely possible that is what Qatar wanted. Airbus will have to figure out how to redeploy aircraft it has built or has committed to build for QR but both parties are better off going their separate ways. It really is up to QR to make sure they can find a better deal elsewhere which may or may not be the case. Boeing has little incentive to aggressively try to win the deal.

    2. Justin Guest

      Airbus won the legal case about re-selling the 320s. They have NOT won the legal case surrounding the 350s premature wear and tear.

    3. Andy Diamond

      My recollection is also that the "main case" (i.e. premature wear and tear of the A350) is not yet decided.

  13. Tim Wimberly Guest

    Mr. Al Akbar Baker, is not a Very Bright Dude. Now, Let’s Look at the Possibility of Airbus A350-1000 XWB Customers from Qatar Airways Order being Canceled by Air Airbus as well as by the Corporate Law Judge in the UK. Air India Does not have Have Their MRO Facility set up for any of the Airbus A350 Variants Yet. Lufthansa has an MRO Facility in Munich and in Malta, BA has the A350-1000 in...

    Mr. Al Akbar Baker, is not a Very Bright Dude. Now, Let’s Look at the Possibility of Airbus A350-1000 XWB Customers from Qatar Airways Order being Canceled by Air Airbus as well as by the Corporate Law Judge in the UK. Air India Does not have Have Their MRO Facility set up for any of the Airbus A350 Variants Yet. Lufthansa has an MRO Facility in Munich and in Malta, BA has the A350-1000 in their fleet, Virgin Atlantic, and Etihad have the A350-1000 as well. These Airline’s have to have “Cash Up Front” to reserve manufacturing slot spaces for all 21 of These aircraft to be produced and also don’t forget all about the Cross-Default Clauses in the Original Qatar Airways Airbus A350 original Purchase Contract Agreement that the judge presiding hearing the case has activated to make Qatar Airways shell out Big Money to offset the Cost of Each Airbus A350 that is manufactured and produced under the original order Purchase Contract Agreement that was signed by both Airbus and Qatar Airways. BIG WHITE TAIL DISCOUNTS are coming to the “WINNER TAKES IT ALL” Buyers in this Future Chain of Events. Lufthansa will Definitely Get “A BIG PIECE OF THE PIE.”

    Take Care
    T..W.
    Critical Research Criminologist
    and
    African/African-American Historian

  14. T- Guest

    Im still on Akbar's side on the Airbus issue. If Airbus refuses to sell its aircraft in perfect condition than Akbar has every reason to throw a fit. It's quite a double standard to hold Boeings feet to the fire but not Airbus. If one doesn't agree with Airbus they will try to damage one's airline. That's terrible business. I suspect that this is an Airbus fan issue. Some Airbus fans can't see beyond their noses.

    1. Hugh Guest

      This issue has nothing to do with a fan base.
      Airbus delivered new airliners to Qatar, the launch customer in good faith. Airbus, as Boeing Company does, do not manufacture poor products intentionally. Regretfully a paint/delamination issue has occured. Airbus will resolve the issue given some introspection. For the Qatari Civil Aviation Authority to ground the fleet is somewhat over the top. If it were that much of a safety issue Airbus would ground...

      This issue has nothing to do with a fan base.
      Airbus delivered new airliners to Qatar, the launch customer in good faith. Airbus, as Boeing Company does, do not manufacture poor products intentionally. Regretfully a paint/delamination issue has occured. Airbus will resolve the issue given some introspection. For the Qatari Civil Aviation Authority to ground the fleet is somewhat over the top. If it were that much of a safety issue Airbus would ground the aircraft themselves so as not to sully their reputation. Airbus is fully aware no doubt as to what is in play here.
      Both Boeing and Airbus build good aircraft.
      I believe Qatar Airlines have done themselves a great disservice and will regret this unfortunate break down of trust.

    2. Nicolas Guest

      I am sure Boeing would have reacted the same way. The biggest point of the story is that all airlines have managed to find agreements with Airbus on that issue whether it is extra-paint services or else.... but Qatar. More than 50 airlines are operating the A350 including in some countries that are generally not Europe-friendly (Russia, China, USA, Kuwait,...) and yet they have had a normal business relationship with Airbus.
      Qatar is just a toxic client.

  15. NathanJ Gold

    Admiral Akbar is certainly the queen of overplaying her hand.

    Well played, Airbus.

  16. Donna Diamond

    Good that Airbus dropped Qatar. Now, if Qatar would just drop Al Baker.

    1. Kevin Guest

      You mean Karen Al Baker

  17. Reno Joe Guest

    This might be exactly what Qatar wanted strategically. Looking at its typical short-haul mission, it doesn't need the range of the XLR -- the 737 will do. If it makes the switch with these aircraft, perhaps they negotiate a package deal that includes the 787. So, rather than look at this contract and that contract separately, Airbus might have just handed it exactly what they wanted.

    Don't throw me into that briar patch.

    1. Stuart Guest

      I tend to agree with you, the shorter range MAX would work on many of the routes AND they can also convert some orders to the smaller 787 which would fit on some of the longer thin routes.

      However, I am not sure that as a whole "this is what they wanted." Their negotiating hand on prices for future orders just got taken away. Boeing can be far less aggressive on pricing with them.

    2. Kiwi Guest

      Yes plus given the fact that XLR slots are constrained by long lead times they’re relatively valuable and potentially traceable with Airbus/others

    3. Frank B Member

      Qatar could always buy the COMAC 919. Yeah, even I can't pull that off with a straight face.

  18. Mantis Guest

    If they're going to unilaterally cancel the order and leave Qatar with only a partial fleet, and not even acknowledge what is clearly a quality issue, seems like they should be on the hook to take the aircraft back and refund them all of their money. Airbus is obviously too powerful now, and taking advantage of Boeings recent missteps.

    1. Kiwi Guest

      Why would the party who performed their part of the contract, I.e. built the plane, be penalized? The party who failed to perform their obligations under the contract here is clearly Qatar by failing to take delivery and pay for the plane. They’ll probably also get stuck with any consequential damages from onselling the aircraft to another party as well due to not performing their obligations

    2. Azamaraal Diamond

      Airbus clearly built A350 with a severe surface degradation problem. They are trying to hide it and only Qatar has the ability to stand up to them. If/when there is a structural failure then maybe the other countries will notice. For whatever reason Qatar is the only ME3 with A350 of the same vintage with the problem (which may be corrected on new builds).

      If EK/EY have the same problem when they take delivery of...

      Airbus clearly built A350 with a severe surface degradation problem. They are trying to hide it and only Qatar has the ability to stand up to them. If/when there is a structural failure then maybe the other countries will notice. For whatever reason Qatar is the only ME3 with A350 of the same vintage with the problem (which may be corrected on new builds).

      If EK/EY have the same problem when they take delivery of A350 in the future then Airbus will have to pay the piper. EK has A380 which are metal skin, not fibre. That is the difference so far.

    3. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      "They are trying to hide it"

      What on Earth are you babbling about? Are you somehow unaware that QR is not the only airline to suffer A350 degradation (LH, AY, DL, and others all have reported similar damage on some of their aircraft), but *is* the only airline to whine about it to the media, and the only one whose CAA grounded the plane, and the only one to fail to find an amicable solution...

      "They are trying to hide it"

      What on Earth are you babbling about? Are you somehow unaware that QR is not the only airline to suffer A350 degradation (LH, AY, DL, and others all have reported similar damage on some of their aircraft), but *is* the only airline to whine about it to the media, and the only one whose CAA grounded the plane, and the only one to fail to find an amicable solution with Airbus.

      So how, in your fanciful claim, is Airbus "trying to hide it," when all of the above is already a matter of record?

  19. Grey Member

    Qatar overplayed their hand from the start. They thought that by having their regulator ground the plane, they could leverage that into better terms on the renegotiations, but a global airline only has Airbus or Boeing, while Airbus and Boeing has a world full of airlines. Airbus and Boeing surely never want to lose a customer, but it is better than having a customer that runs around telling the world that your planes are dangerous...

    Qatar overplayed their hand from the start. They thought that by having their regulator ground the plane, they could leverage that into better terms on the renegotiations, but a global airline only has Airbus or Boeing, while Airbus and Boeing has a world full of airlines. Airbus and Boeing surely never want to lose a customer, but it is better than having a customer that runs around telling the world that your planes are dangerous just because you refuse to give them a discount. And really paints them into a corner for negotiations with Boeing, as they can not threaten to take their business elsewhere. This will surely be extremely costly for Qatar if they can not resolve this.

  20. Tim Dunn Diamond

    Companies do have the right to "fire" their customers if the relationship is no longer beneficial and the financial aspects of any agreements are "reset." QR has likely shot themselves in the foot on many levels, esp. for an airline that is trying to aggressively grow. Airbus doesn't need the black eye but other airlines are experiencing similar issues but perhaps not to the same degree but Boeing certain has their issues as well.
    ...

    Companies do have the right to "fire" their customers if the relationship is no longer beneficial and the financial aspects of any agreements are "reset." QR has likely shot themselves in the foot on many levels, esp. for an airline that is trying to aggressively grow. Airbus doesn't need the black eye but other airlines are experiencing similar issues but perhaps not to the same degree but Boeing certain has their issues as well.
    Russia and China, I hear, are trying to make a bigger splash in the large, widebody aircraft market.

  21. Keith Guest

    Qatar lacks the leverage it needs to make their current position work. Airbus has customers ready to take Qatar's order, and going to Boeing for additional production is iffy at best.

    At the core of this dispute: what exactly what can Airbus do to meet Qatar's complaint of deterioration? It sounds like Qatar wants the A350s to be taken back anyway and rebuilt to their specifications.

  22. AJO Guest

    Have the 359s been "un-grounded" in the meantime? A7-ALK, ALR, ALS, ALY and ALZ are currently in air, operating for QR.

    1. JB Guest

      I don't believe these A350's were ever grounded, as they were some of the later A350-900 deliveries to QR, so they haven't been flying for as long and therefore haven't been affected (or have been affected very little). These planes have been flying to MIA for the past year and I flew 2 QR A359's out of MIA in the last 6 months (both with the registration codes in your comment) and they both had...

      I don't believe these A350's were ever grounded, as they were some of the later A350-900 deliveries to QR, so they haven't been flying for as long and therefore haven't been affected (or have been affected very little). These planes have been flying to MIA for the past year and I flew 2 QR A359's out of MIA in the last 6 months (both with the registration codes in your comment) and they both had some paint missing on about 2/3 of the rivets on the wings (some parts of the wings had more than others, depending on the curve of the wing). That was definitely strange considering those planes were less than 3 years old.

  23. AJ Member

    "The writing was on the wall for, but it looks like it has finally happened?"

    For...for what? A long time?

    1. Reno Joe Guest

      There has been a dispute between Qatar and Airbus for a long time -- reference, the paint issue -- at least a couple / few years. What's finally happened is that the relationship has so broken down that Airbus cancelled this particular order -- not something one would expect a manufacturer to do.

    2. SNO Guest

      After Qatar went around interfering with Airbus’s business by badmouthing them it’s the best to distance them and have no relation to them anymore.

    3. Chris Guest

      Airbus is in the wrong and it will bite them in the ass and they will come crawling back.

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Grey Member

Qatar overplayed their hand from the start. They thought that by having their regulator ground the plane, they could leverage that into better terms on the renegotiations, but a global airline only has Airbus or Boeing, while Airbus and Boeing has a world full of airlines. Airbus and Boeing surely never want to lose a customer, but it is better than having a customer that runs around telling the world that your planes are dangerous just because you refuse to give them a discount. And really paints them into a corner for negotiations with Boeing, as they can not threaten to take their business elsewhere. This will surely be extremely costly for Qatar if they can not resolve this.

7
Reno Joe Guest

There has been a dispute between Qatar and Airbus for a long time -- reference, the paint issue -- at least a couple / few years. What's finally happened is that the relationship has so broken down that Airbus cancelled this particular order -- not something one would expect a manufacturer to do.

3
Ivan Guest

Karma happened to Qatar Airways and they’re now getting some of their own medicine, which is amazing! Their crew is treated horribly. I’m mostly referring to the flight attendants - working on minimum crew, working on minimum rest, having a curfew of 4AM when you are in Doha on your off days - yes, you can’t have a night out and come back on the other day like normal people do; can’t even attend your friends’ birthdays cause you need to plan when exactly to order your taxi so you don't get fired; not being able to go out 12 hours before the pickup time (bus to airport prior to a flight), with only 90 min allowed within the 12 hours to go get food. During the initial (Ab-initio) trainings guys and girls are split into separate classes and they’re not even allowed to speak to each other in the cafeteria. With Qatar Airways you don’t have a job and a life. You get a life about your job because the company is managing you in every aspect of your life. Surveillance cameras are placed at the doors (some buildings even the floors have separate cameras) of your accommodation to see when you go out and come back. And to exit/enter you need to swipe a card so they detect the exact time, and fire you if you came back home 4:01 instead of 03:59. It is however super sad for the people whose lives are totally absorbed by a company that doesn’t give a sh*t about their employees. People in Qatar Airways are just numbers. They have money to buy the awards they like to brag about on social media and contribute to their toxic environment, they sure will have some spare cash for some extra boeings.

2
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