Official: Boeing 787 Deliveries To Resume Shortly

Official: Boeing 787 Deliveries To Resume Shortly

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A bit over a week ago it was rumored that Boeing could soon resume the delivery of 787s. This has now been confirmed, which I know lots of airline executives (and maybe even customers) will be excited about.

FAA approves Boeing 787 fixes

The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has approved Boeing’s inspection and modification plans for resuming deliveries of the 787 Dreamliner. The organization released the following statement:

“Boeing has made the necessary changes to ensure that the 787 Dreamliner meets certification standards. The FAA will inspect each aircraft before an airworthiness certificate is issued and cleared for delivery. We expect deliveries to resume in the coming days.”

For context, Boeing hasn’t been able to deliver any 787s to airlines for well over a year, since May 2021. Boeing currently has roughly 120 787s that are due to be delivered, but that hasn’t been possible due to production issues. With the latest plan, it’s expected that Boeing will be able to resume 787 deliveries in the coming days, almost certainly in August.

Boeing has also significantly slowed down production of the 787 due to these issues, since these jets couldn’t actually be delivered. The aircraft manufacturer is currently only producing around five 787s per month. You can expect that it will take Boeing some time to ramp up production, even with full approval from the FAA.

Boeing being able to resume 787 deliveries will no doubt be welcome news for airline customers. We’ve seen a huge increase in travel demand, so airlines have been counting on newly delivered jets in order to operate certain routes. Boeing 787 deliveries being halted has had a negative impact on the operations of several airlines.

When deliveries do resume, it’s expected that American Airlines will be among the first to take delivery of 787s. The airline is still hoping to take delivery of nine of these jets this year, which will allow the carrier to add more long haul routes.

Similarly, Hawaiian Airlines is supposed to start flying Boeing 787s soon. There has been a 787 in the Hawaiian Airlines livery for well over a year now, yet the airline hasn’t been able to take delivery of it. This is also the plane on which Hawaiian will introduce its new business class.

So, what’s wrong with the Boeing 787?

Of course Boeing hasn’t exactly had a great several years, with the biggest issue being the Boeing 737 MAX, and everything that emerged about Boeing’s corporate culture as a result of that.

However, Boeing’s best selling wide body jet has been having some major issues of its own. The Boeing 787 issues first started in September 2020, when the FAA said that it found some manufacturing flaws with these jets. This came as the FAA pledged to be more active in the certification process of aircraft.

Delivery of these jets was first suspended for around five months, though deliveries could resume as of March 2021. Then a couple of months later, deliveries were suspended once again.

Boeing 787 production flaws related to gaps between panels of the carbon-composite fuselage. In addition to the production issues as such, the other problem was in regards to the FAA’s oversight of the delivery of these jets, so a more transparent and regulated inspection process had to be figured out there as well.

American is expected to be the first airline to get 787s

Bottom line

Boeing and the FAA have come to an agreement on 787 production issues and inspections, and Dreamliner deliveries should resume shortly. The 787 has been having production issues for nearly two years, with deliveries being suspended altogether since May 2021.

There’s a backlog of roughly 120 Boeing 787s, so hopefully those can be delivered soon, since I know lots of airlines are relying on these jets to operate some routes.

What do you make of Boeing 787 deliveries resuming?

Conversations (23)
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  1. Aviator Guest

    This is a $15 Billion good news story. I'm sure the Unions are working (sic) to help Boeing get back on its feet. Go get 'em BA!!!!!

  2. TM Guest

    Boeings problems can be traced to management deciding to move production out of Washington state to South Carolina purely for cost savings. It’s like a German built Mercedes or an Egyptian built Mercedes. Boeing used to be an engineer’s company instead of run by number crunchers. My late father, a Boeing engineer would be quite disappointed in the shape of the company today.

  3. RetiredATLATC Diamond

    This goes back to when the FAA decided, in the early 2000's, that the airlines and airline manufacturers were "customers" and oversight became lax.

    The FAA should ONLY be a regulatory institution and not get in bed with the airlines.

  4. Mike Guest

    I’ll take the A330neo and A350 over the 787 anyday. The 787 looks like a stretch 737, no thanks.

  5. Gaurav Community Ambassador

    We were in Charleston last year and it's shocking how many of these are lined up around the airport. I'm sure airlines will be happy to start taking delivery.

  6. Lemuel Guest

    Hey Ben, did you get AA ConciergeKey status like Gary did?

  7. Azamaraal Diamond

    It is great news. I personally prefer the 787 as I always arrive in better shape that when travelling long haul on Airbus 330-900, 350 or whatever.

    The temperature/humidity/pressure control/noise reduction on the 787 is far superior to Airbus - so I prefer it even if the fuselage is a couple of inches narrower.

    1. DLPTATL Gold

      @Azamaraal - I've come to the opposite conclusion after flying both. Humidity and Pressure are almost identical between 787 and 350 at 25% and the equivalent of 6,000 ft above sea level on both aircraft. Both are marked improvements from 20% and equivalent 8,000 ft for previous generation aircraft. I prefer the window blinds on the 350 and also find the 350 to be quieter (Airbus claims they're 5 decibels quieter than on the 787)....

      @Azamaraal - I've come to the opposite conclusion after flying both. Humidity and Pressure are almost identical between 787 and 350 at 25% and the equivalent of 6,000 ft above sea level on both aircraft. Both are marked improvements from 20% and equivalent 8,000 ft for previous generation aircraft. I prefer the window blinds on the 350 and also find the 350 to be quieter (Airbus claims they're 5 decibels quieter than on the 787). As far as temperature goes that has more to do with the airline and crew.

  8. Sergio Guest

    Actually the 777 is Boeing best selling widebody and of the world. The 787 is fastest. But glad to hear that. Looking forward Hawaiian airlines!

  9. Drexl Guest

    Good news. Fuel efficient, long range airliner. The kind of airframe the industry needs.

  10. S Member

    Most liveries look good on the 787 but that Hawaiin one looks amazing.

  11. ExitRow Guest

    The problem with Boeing's corporate culture is way toooooo many MBA's driving the boat. In my 33 year career, I've seen several occasions where a gaggle of MBAs obsessed with obscure economic formulas created significant damage to the company and alienated customers.
    Let's hope Boeing has learned its lesson!!

  12. Eskimo Guest

    Boeing and FAA are still buddies. They suspend the deliveries so airlines can have money to pay.

    If the government didn't bailout those Transaero 747-8 who's going to buy them.
    It's all about the money.

  13. Donna Diamond

    Great news! I love this plane!

  14. D3kingg Guest

    Hawaiian airlines doesn’t need a 787. There are other airlines that require these aircraft in order to serve international ultra long haul 14 hr flights.

    1. Kor Guest

      You are airlines CEO or COO to know what they need?

    2. BenjaminGuttery Gold

      LOL. Who are you to decide? Not all flights to Hawaii are short (obviously) and not all flights/passengers are for leisure trips. Many are for supplies & personel to support to islands.

    3. D3kingg Guest

      There are no routes that Hawaiian airlines couldn’t fly to with their current fleet. Unless they plan on flying to London , Singapore , or Sydney. There is a shortage of 787s and other airlines that need them should be delivered first.

    4. Mulqueen Guest

      I don't think you understand that orders aren't fulfilled based on the operating requirements of airlines, there's an order log and the airline that orders first gets to be placed in a queue. Hawaiian already has had its 787s delayed by over 2 years.

    5. Dan66W Guest

      You have no idea the airframe planning that Hawaiian has done. Do you think it’s that easy to add a few months to a long term aircraft lease when a return date has already specified and a contract has already been signed with a new airline. How about their 330 spare parts stash that they’ve probably started selling off. New engine overhaul costs to be incurred. Crew displacements and class dates already published. All because D3kingg thinks HA is not worthy enough.

    6. Ben Guest

      Hawaiian do indeed fly to Sydney.

    7. Gaurav Community Ambassador

      Funny... Maybe there should be a government agency who decides who is "most deserving" of the airframe instead of the free market. I'm sure you'd be right on board with something like that right D3kingg?

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.

TM Guest

Boeings problems can be traced to management deciding to move production out of Washington state to South Carolina purely for cost savings. It’s like a German built Mercedes or an Egyptian built Mercedes. Boeing used to be an engineer’s company instead of run by number crunchers. My late father, a Boeing engineer would be quite disappointed in the shape of the company today.

4
ExitRow Guest

The problem with Boeing's corporate culture is way toooooo many MBA's driving the boat. In my 33 year career, I've seen several occasions where a gaggle of MBAs obsessed with obscure economic formulas created significant damage to the company and alienated customers. Let's hope Boeing has learned its lesson!!

4
DLPTATL Gold

@Azamaraal - I've come to the opposite conclusion after flying both. Humidity and Pressure are almost identical between 787 and 350 at 25% and the equivalent of 6,000 ft above sea level on both aircraft. Both are marked improvements from 20% and equivalent 8,000 ft for previous generation aircraft. I prefer the window blinds on the 350 and also find the 350 to be quieter (Airbus claims they're 5 decibels quieter than on the 787). As far as temperature goes that has more to do with the airline and crew.

2
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