Norse Atlantic: New Transatlantic Low Cost Airline

Norse Atlantic: New Transatlantic Low Cost Airline

37

In the spring of 2021 we first learned about Norse Atlantic Airways, a new Norwegian low cost long haul airline startup (sounds like a familiar concept, eh?). Additional details about the airline have slowly been made available, and today we’ve learned the first routes that the airline plans to operate, and they’re… interesting ones.

Let’s cover the basics about the airline, including the latest updates.

Norse Atlantic Airways basics

Norse Atlantic Airways is a transatlantic airline startup that plans to launch operations in 2022:

  • The airline was founded by Bjorn Kljos, Bjørn Kise, and Bjørn Tore Larsen (that’s a lot of Bjorns/Bjørns), who own a majority of the airline; they’re industry veterans who previously held top positions at Norwegian Air Shuttle and OSM Aviation
  • The airline plans to use Boeing 787s to operate transatlantic routes
  • In Europe the airline will operate out of cities like London, Oslo, and Paris, and in the United States the airline will operate out of cities like Los Angeles, Miami, and New York (we now have more specific details about the first routes, which I’ll cover below)
  • The airline hopes to launch operations in the spring of 2022, specifically in the end of the first quarter or beginning of the second quarter, when it’s hoped that transatlantic travel demand will have recovered (the United States lifting travel restrictions for vaccinated foreigners will help with that)

As CEO Bjørn Tore Larsen describes the company’s plans:

“We strongly believe that there is a need for a new and innovative airline serving the low-cost intercontinental market with modern, more environmentally friendly and fuel-efficient aircraft as the world gradually reopens. Our plans are on track and operations will commence when travel restrictions are lifted and demand for transatlantic travel is back.

Based on the current situation, we anticipate that all our 15 Dreamliners will be flying customers between Europe and the U.S. next summer. We will launch our ticket sales approximately three months prior to first flight and will offer exciting destinations that have proven to be attractive.”

Norse Atlantic Airways will fly former Norwegian 787s

Norse Atlantic Airways will fly 15 Boeing 787s

Norse Atlantic Airways has already signed lease agreements for a total of 15 Boeing 787s, all of which used to fly for Norwegian:

  • The airline is leasing nine Boeing 787s from AerCap, and six Boeing 787s from BOC Aviation
  • 12 of the planes will be 787-9s, while three of the planes will be 787-8s
  • Some of these planes have extremely long lease terms, of up to 16 years; the airline stated that these planes have been leased with “attractive rates and payment terms, allowing the company a flexible implementation during start-up of its operation”

I would imagine that these 787s will simply maintain the same interiors that they previously had with Norwegian, given that it’s the most cost efficient option. That’s good for consumers.

Norwegian’s 787s had a solid premium economy product, with recliner seats in 2-3-2 configuration. Norwegian premium economy was a good value.

Norwegian 787 premium economy cabin

Meanwhile Norwegian’s economy was in a 3-3-3 configuration. While not the most spacious out there, the personal entertainment, mood lighting, power ports, and internet, were ultimately a solid offering for an ultra low cost carrier (Norse Atlantic plans to offer Wi-Fi, much like Norwegian).

Norwegian 787 economy cabin

Norse Atlantic Airways is highlighting the features of the 787, and there aren’t any real surprises there.

Norse Atlantic Airways 787 amenities

Norse Atlantic Airways initial routes

Norse Atlantic Airways has filed with the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) to request a foreign air carrier permit, and as part of this we’ve learned the carrier’s first routes. The airline initially plans to fly from Oslo (OSL) to:

  • Fort Lauderdale (FLL)
  • New York Stewart (SWF)
  • Ontario (ONT)
Norse Atlantic Airways’ initial routes

Wow, there’s a lot to unpack there:

  • It’s interesting that the carrier’s focus will initially be on operating long haul services out of Norway, rather than fifth freedom flights from other major European cities
  • Norse Atlantic seems to plan to keep costs low by flying to “alternative” airports across the board, as the airline is avoiding Los Angeles (LAX), Miami (MIA), and New York (JFK)
  • This will be Ontario’s only transatlantic service, and it’s also hard to believe that Stewart will be getting regularly scheduled transatlantic 787 flights; the airport used to have transatlantic service with Norwegian 737s, but 787s is a different level
Norwegian used to fly 737s to Stewart

Norse Atlantic Airways livery & branding

In August, Norse Atlantic Airways revealed its livery and basic elements of the brand, designed by a small in-house team and a local agency. As the idea behind the brand is described:

“Inspired by the Norsemen who traveled and explored the world with their state-of-the art longships, Norse Atlantic Airways will give people the opportunity to explore other continents by offering affordable flights on board modern and more environmentally friendly Boeing 787 Dreamliners.”

While the livery isn’t the most creative we’ve ever seen, I’d say it generally looks pretty sharp.

Norse Boeing 787 livery

Norse Atlantic Airways labor plans

Initially there were some concerns about whether Norse Atlantic Airways would get approval from regulators in the United States to launch these kinds of flights. Earlier this year the Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Peter DeFazio, urged Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg to block Norse Atlantic Airways from flying to the United States:

“At the end of 2016, the outgoing administration imprudently issued a foreign air carrier permit to Norwegian Air International — an airline that was ‘Norwegian’ in name only and established itself in Ireland under a flag of convenience to avoid Norway’s strong labor protections. Norwegian is bankrupt, and its U.S. services have ceased, but its founder is forming a new carrier that will likely seek a permit—Norse Atlantic—and it is imperative that you correct the error of 2016 and deny this airline’s application.”

Fortunately this shouldn’t be an issue for the airline, thanks to some things that have been revealed since then:

  • Norse Atlantic Airways plans to have around 1,600 employees by the summer of 2022, all permanently and directly employed by the airline
  • Norse Atlantic Airways has reached a union deal before even hiring the first flight attendant, clearly intended to mitigate this potential issue

Why I’m skeptical of Norse Atlantic Airways

Let me start by saying that Norse Atlantic Airways will be fantastic for consumers, just as Norwegian was. That being said, I don’t see how the business model here can make sense.

At the beginning of 2021 it was announced that Norwegian would discontinue long haul flights, as the airline was in bankruptcy protection. Norwegian was struggling for years even pre-pandemic, and has basically already had its nine lives.

The intentions for Norse Atlantic Airways are pretty clear — some investors (including a former Norwegian executive) with a clean balance sheet are trying to take over where Norwegian left off when it comes to long haul. There’s only one small problem — history has shown that low cost long haul airlines generally don’t work.

Now, to give some credit to this idea in general, or to perhaps express some hope:

  • Having an airline like Norse Atlantic Airways would be great for consumers, since it will keep legacy airlines in check, and will keep fares low
  • The general timeline for launching this airline isn’t terrible, since we should hopefully see transatlantic travel largely rebounding by next summer; the airline probably got a great deal on planes, so I imagine costs will be fairly low
  • The biggest issue with a transatlantic low cost carrier is how seasonal traffic is, as Norwegian could make money in summer, but was losing a significant amount the rest of the year; is there any way that Norse Atlantic Airways could learn from Norwegian’s mistakes and do a better job with a counter seasonal route network (though that concept has its own challenges)?

This is going to be an interesting one to watch. It has been made pretty clear that Norse Atlantic Airways will exclusively operate between Europe and the United States, and that market in winter sure isn’t an easy one, especially without business travelers.

Norse Atlantic Airways is Norwegian 2.0

Bottom line

Norse Atlantic Airways is the newest long haul, low cost airline startup. The airline essentially plans to pick up where Norwegian left off with its long haul network — the airline will fly former Norwegian 787s across the Atlantic using a low cost business model. The airline has secured lease agreements for 15 planes, and plans to launch operations in the spring of 2022. Norse Atlantic will initially fly from Oslo to Fort Lauderdale, Ontario, and Stewart.

It seems pretty certain at this point that the airline will indeed launch operations. The question is how long it lasts, and what it will do different than Norwegian.

What do you make of Norse Atlantic Airways?

Conversations (37)
The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.
Type your response here.

If you'd like to participate in the discussion, please adhere to our commenting guidelines. Anyone can comment, and your email address will not be published. Register to save your unique username and earn special OMAAT reputation perks!

  1. Justin Guest

    I flew from Berlin Brandenburg Airport to New York JFK Airport and back to Berlin Brandenburg Airport in September 2022 for my vacation. As soon as I landed back to Berlin Brandenburg Airport from my holiday in New York, I noticed that my checked-in luggage did not arrive at the airport.

    The airline lost my luggage in a SIMPLE DIRECT FLIGHT between NEW YORK and BERLIN, it was very difficult to get through to...

    I flew from Berlin Brandenburg Airport to New York JFK Airport and back to Berlin Brandenburg Airport in September 2022 for my vacation. As soon as I landed back to Berlin Brandenburg Airport from my holiday in New York, I noticed that my checked-in luggage did not arrive at the airport.

    The airline lost my luggage in a SIMPLE DIRECT FLIGHT between NEW YORK and BERLIN, it was very difficult to get through to them after NOT ANSWERING emails and calls, then after about 2 weeks, they located my luggage. However, then it took them another 2/3 weeks for them to deliver my luggage because their service is horrible and they were not getting in touch with me regarding my address and information. I tried so many times to call and get an answer from them or an email to check about why my located luggage is not being sent to me, however no answer whatsoever.
    After contacting some workers on LinkedIn I managed to get some info and got my luggage delivered to me finally! However, when I went to pickup my luggage, I found it partially BROKEN and DAMAGED.

    Obviously I asked for a compensation form and filled in the amount which was due for items which I had to buy that were in my luggage through the duration that it was missing for about a month. I bought basic day to day stuff like underwear, pants, socks and shirt and some liquids, which amounted to only around 200euros all together. Also, I listed down the cost which was due to me for my broken luggage.

    However, their customer service, afterwards told me that since I got my luggage back, I am due to no money back whatsoever on items that I bought. Absolutely horrible after all the stress and hassle they passed me through with lot's of my stuff missing. That's not all of it, the cherry on top of the cake is that they blamed me for not having a durable enough luggage to withstand transit and that they WILL NOT REFUND ME for my BROKEN LUGGAGE which they broke due to them not doing a simple task of handling my chcked-in luggage properly.

    Horrible experience and customer service. I highly do not recommend this airline.

  2. Glen Guest

    Was a frequent flyer of Norwegian- Austin Texas to London Gatwick. They provided fresh, clean and modern aircraft- With friendly staff- At rates that were impossible to believe.
    $700 round trip? Please come back to Texas!!!

  3. Michelle Mann Guest

    I never had a problem with Norweigan took it 5 times to Ireland to see my mom...I even got stuck in Belfast for 3 days till they got me another flight which I had to take out of dublin they paid the cab fare and even got 700 bucks back due to the 3 day lay over its a law in UK for stuff like that...paid for my hotel and food so I can't complain...

    I never had a problem with Norweigan took it 5 times to Ireland to see my mom...I even got stuck in Belfast for 3 days till they got me another flight which I had to take out of dublin they paid the cab fare and even got 700 bucks back due to the 3 day lay over its a law in UK for stuff like that...paid for my hotel and food so I can't complain and yea seats werent that comfortable BUT you get what u pay for flight was cheap enough to deal with it I hope if new company comes they do straight flights into Belfast again!

  4. Rosemary uckley Guest

    I love flying out of Stewart - but,unfortunately, the airport no longer loves its former customers.
    Norwegian was a great idea, if you don’t mind a 5 hr flight with no toilet paper ( that’s before the plane even took off!) ….or having the seat in front so close that there is no place for your knees …or you would like to breath fresh air. Our flight to Ireland was the worse flight I...

    I love flying out of Stewart - but,unfortunately, the airport no longer loves its former customers.
    Norwegian was a great idea, if you don’t mind a 5 hr flight with no toilet paper ( that’s before the plane even took off!) ….or having the seat in front so close that there is no place for your knees …or you would like to breath fresh air. Our flight to Ireland was the worse flight I have ever experienced. By the time we arrived ( a mere 5 hrs late, I had a headache and sore throat that eventually evolved into a killer cough. I was sick the entire 2 weeks that we were overseas and sick for another two weeks after we got home. There is a reason they went out of business and it sounds like this new airline is just another Norwegian with a slightly different name.

  5. John W. Mahoney Guest

    Norwegian Airline treated its customers very badly. Prepaid tickets were canceled and the company kept the customer's money. Norwegian claimed that customers would get credit (airline miles) to use on future flights. Then Norwegian changed their rules to only allow a very small number of airline miles to be used on any flight, and then only a trivial amount each month. Norwegian effectively stole their customer's money (and European flight rules allow this). Why does...

    Norwegian Airline treated its customers very badly. Prepaid tickets were canceled and the company kept the customer's money. Norwegian claimed that customers would get credit (airline miles) to use on future flights. Then Norwegian changed their rules to only allow a very small number of airline miles to be used on any flight, and then only a trivial amount each month. Norwegian effectively stole their customer's money (and European flight rules allow this). Why does your new airline deserve to be trusted with customer funds, planning or trust? How will your new airline treat customer funds?

  6. Bagoly Guest

    https://www.travelweekly.com/Travel-News/Airline-News/Norse-Atlantic-Airways-labor-agreement-flight-attendants has:
    "The union said Norse expects to create at least 700 flight attendant jobs in the U.S. "

    So maybe they have learnt from the past, and will hire pilots in the USA as well so that the effect of IRROPS eastbound can be substantially reduced.
    The point-to-point only approach is presumably based on their experience as Norwegian that the extra complication of connections is not worth it.

    https://www.travelweekly.com/Travel-News/Airline-News/Norse-Atlantic-Airways-labor-agreement-flight-attendants has:
    "The union said Norse expects to create at least 700 flight attendant jobs in the U.S. "

    So maybe they have learnt from the past, and will hire pilots in the USA as well so that the effect of IRROPS eastbound can be substantially reduced.
    The point-to-point only approach is presumably based on their experience as Norwegian that the extra complication of connections is not worth it.

  7. Manfred Guest

    I had previously flown on Norwegian and decided never again. That was long before they went belly up.
    It is not so important which airport they fly to if the fares are low, but the lack of ground support as soon as something goes wrong matters.
    When I flew through Oslo, they managed to make me lose my connection and the suit case along the way. Took me 3 days and a trip...

    I had previously flown on Norwegian and decided never again. That was long before they went belly up.
    It is not so important which airport they fly to if the fares are low, but the lack of ground support as soon as something goes wrong matters.
    When I flew through Oslo, they managed to make me lose my connection and the suit case along the way. Took me 3 days and a trip back to the airport to retrieve it! The phone line was never answered.
    Whoever considers flying this new airline should take a look at the Facebook Group called “ Norwegian Airlines Experiences from Hell” I predict Norse Atlantic will be no different!

  8. Judy Guest

    Norwegian ran daily flights to Ireland from Stewart airport. These low cost flights were extremely popular with the Irish Diaspora in the New York area. Could I suggest you look at a route possibly serving Ireland west airport? This part of ireland is a hotspot for tourists and emigrants. Otherwise look at Shannon as no flights to west coast at present.

  9. Judy Guest

    Norwegian ran daily flights to Ireland from Stewart airport. These low cost flights were extremely popular with the Irish Diaspora in the New York area. Could I suggest you look at a route possibly serving Ireland west airport? This part of ireland is a hotspot for tourists and emigrants. Otherwise look at Shannon as no flights to west coast at present.

  10. Sven Guest

    Many in the NY area prefer to fly from Stewart instead having to get to and from New York City airports. I plan to try this, even as I am not going to Oslo as my final destination, but to Copenhagen, which can be reached by train or overnight boat.

  11. Christopher L Guest

    I wish they had chosen Orlando MCO, but maybe by then the Brightline will be completed all the way up here. (I have no idea how close the FTL Brightline station is to the FTL airport...)

    1. NorseFA Guest

      The Orlando airport for Norse hasn't been chosen yet.

      Brightline does not stop anywhere near Fort Lauderdale Airport and it doesn't look like it'll be stopping at Orlando airport either.

  12. Abey Guest

    Flying to SWF is really not a way to avoid JFK, it might as well be in a different time zone ! No public transportation or anything of interest near Stewart

  13. Gary Hohenstein Guest

    I would love to be able to fly to Stewart and avoid NYC. I hope we are made aware when they start service next year.

  14. Tim Guest

    We had 3 flights to London from Phoenix but we also have a huge amount of connectivity. This this airline will have 0 connectivity in Stewart yeah it's a connectivity in Stuart maybe a little in Ontario if they're lucky and possibly more in Fort Lauderdale. But they are basically going straight for point to point only. I give them 2 years if they're lucky.

  15. dander Guest

    Phoenix had three daily daily flights to LHR before covid. The Ontario area has a huge population around it who hate the drive to LAX. I think they could work if they could get some freight.

    1. Tim Guest

      But those flights are American and British airways both which have huge connecting possibility possibilities in Phoenix. This airline will have none of those agreements and benefits especially at Stewart.

  16. Alex Guest

    Only way to make these long haul low cost work is with A321lr/xlr. Kind of like the Jetblue approach.
    I don’t see how they can survive without feed otherwise.

  17. Angus Guest

    I am very excited for international service to resume at SWF. I flew SWF-EDI on Norwegian years ago and found the airport to be incredibly convenient and the lower cost of parking seals the deal for anyone who doesn't like in NYC.

  18. Ita Guest

    I, for one, am thrilled about Stewart. I am from Ireland and live in the Hudson Valley.
    I previously lived in Queens and used the old Norwegian route from Stewart, taking a convenient shuttle service from Port Authority in Manhattan. For my family of 4 it was totally worth the travel upstate. And I am not alone.
    I know from many FB groups, that a route from Stewart to Dublin would. be welcome

  19. Robert Stone Guest

    Pretty sure that's not where Ontario is...

    1. AJL Guest

      It's Ontario, California.

  20. chris Guest

    SWF is a bold move if not stupid. While a lot of wealthy new yorkers moved from Manhattan up to the hudson valley, I doubt its enough to fill planes to Europe and SWF is jut not a very attractive airport versus JFK or EWR.

    While the costs to fly into SWF is going to be lower than JFK, could they really not find space in T1 when their international venture at JFK failed?...

    SWF is a bold move if not stupid. While a lot of wealthy new yorkers moved from Manhattan up to the hudson valley, I doubt its enough to fill planes to Europe and SWF is jut not a very attractive airport versus JFK or EWR.

    While the costs to fly into SWF is going to be lower than JFK, could they really not find space in T1 when their international venture at JFK failed?

    I just don't know how they could really make SWF work if they're trying to capture the NYC market.

    1. Eskimo Guest

      SWF is more accessible than you think. I don't think wealthy people will fly this airline. It's the people who relies on public transportation.

      If people can still think EWR is and easy ride from NYP, then SWF is an easy ride from Grand Central.
      Without a car, SWF is easier than HPN.

      But I agree, I'd rather go with higher fee JFK than SWF.

    2. pstm91 Diamond

      I flew Norwegian and Lingus several times out of SWF and all of my flights were full.

      This is not about attracting wealthy New Yorkers. Wealthy New Yorkers are not booking Norwegian/Norse.

      Westchester, Dutchess, Fairfield, and Putnam counties have HUGE populations to fill these flights. You're also really underestimating the airport itself. Yes, it does not have nice lounges, lots of restaurants, etc, but I'll take no traffic, a 30 second walk from the...

      I flew Norwegian and Lingus several times out of SWF and all of my flights were full.

      This is not about attracting wealthy New Yorkers. Wealthy New Yorkers are not booking Norwegian/Norse.

      Westchester, Dutchess, Fairfield, and Putnam counties have HUGE populations to fill these flights. You're also really underestimating the airport itself. Yes, it does not have nice lounges, lots of restaurants, etc, but I'll take no traffic, a 30 second walk from the parking lot, and 5 minutes to my gate and boarding shortly thereafter over waiting for hours on end at JFK/EWR. I don't care which lounge I'm in, that SWF process/tiny airport feel cannot be beat.

    3. Gregg Guest

      Your statement says it all. The planes were full yet they still lost their shirt and couldn’t make it work. This latest attempt will be no different unless their fares go up dramatically. Even a traditional high cost carrier like UA or AA requires a break-even load factor of 80-90 percent. Full planes do not equal profit.

    4. pstm91 Diamond

      While you're right about the load factor not necessarily equalling profit, I disagree with the rest and think that's a huge over simplification of what happened to Norwegian. They had unbelievably bad luck between the 787 engine issues, the MAXX being grounded, and then the pandemic. None of those factors were there fault and killed the airline The company did over expand too quickly, that was their fault, but they expanded so quickly because they...

      While you're right about the load factor not necessarily equalling profit, I disagree with the rest and think that's a huge over simplification of what happened to Norwegian. They had unbelievably bad luck between the 787 engine issues, the MAXX being grounded, and then the pandemic. None of those factors were there fault and killed the airline The company did over expand too quickly, that was their fault, but they expanded so quickly because they must have been doing well and these routes were part of that success.

  21. ConcordeBoy Guest

    They may have a fighting chance at FLL. Skeptical of SWF.

    But as a Los Angeles resident, I can't understand how they expect to do anything but lose their shirts on a transatlantic flight to Norway, with little feed, in an era where roundtrip nonstops from LAX to London/Paris/Italy/etc are selling for $600 or less, including tax, on multiple carriers.

    It's 45min from downtown to Ontario on a perfect day. Double that, with common...

    They may have a fighting chance at FLL. Skeptical of SWF.

    But as a Los Angeles resident, I can't understand how they expect to do anything but lose their shirts on a transatlantic flight to Norway, with little feed, in an era where roundtrip nonstops from LAX to London/Paris/Italy/etc are selling for $600 or less, including tax, on multiple carriers.

    It's 45min from downtown to Ontario on a perfect day. Double that, with common traffic. Then add another 20min to that from Hollywood or Beverly Hills, and another 30min from any of the big universities, central L.A., the Valley, the beach areas, etc.

    (And before anyone brings up the China Airlines flight from Ontario, know that the bulk of the Chinese/Taiwanese/Hong Konger population in greater L.A. lives and works far closer to ONT than LAX; so that's no surprise)

    1. Leigh Guest

      Also live in LA, and completely agree with you. The idea that there is a market to Oslo from the Inland Empire seems crazy. No one else from LA county area is going to drive that far.

    2. Christian Guest

      As a Norwegian that lives in the IE, I for one love the idea of a direct flight home from Ontario as long as the pricing is good and the service is decent.

  22. Gregg Guest

    This latest attempt will go down the sewer just like the last one. Like others have said, there’s a reason why Ryanair and Easyjet haven’t already gone down this foolhardy road. The industry is littered with the carcasses of carriers who have tried this in the past.

    Fools and their money are soon parted…

  23. Ryan Guest

    May their time as a going concern be safe. And short.

  24. Jeff Guest

    The livery on the tail is one end of a viking ship, right? i think that's pretty creative.

  25. Mauricio Matos Guest

    I mean...if trans Atlantic low cost was lucrative, wouldn't Ryanair or easyJet try it? They are profitable in Europe, so they seem to know what they're doing.

  26. Never In Doubt Guest

    If they don’t have short haul connections in Europe (maybe I missed something?) they’re not going to be providing much competition this time around.

    At least in the SF market, the “keep the prices down” entrant has become TAP.

  27. pstm91 Diamond

    I've posted essentially the same exact comment on every post you've done about Norse/Norwegian. Yes, Norwegian did expand too quickly and aggressively. However, they had MAJOR bad luck going against them; factors that were not their fault. The Dreamliner's engine issues, the MAX being grounded, and then the pandemic. They had a good model and were a fantastic airline, especially considering they are low-cost. I only had good experiences with them, and Stewart is an...

    I've posted essentially the same exact comment on every post you've done about Norse/Norwegian. Yes, Norwegian did expand too quickly and aggressively. However, they had MAJOR bad luck going against them; factors that were not their fault. The Dreamliner's engine issues, the MAX being grounded, and then the pandemic. They had a good model and were a fantastic airline, especially considering they are low-cost. I only had good experiences with them, and Stewart is an absolute joy to fly out of so I am thrilled that they are coming back there. For how ridiculously cheap their fares to Europe were, I had no problem sitting in a slightly harder, narrower seat for a relatively short flight. I welcome Norse to come back (and hopefully bring competitor's fares down as well).

  28. Raksiam Guest

    So, if at first you don't succeed?

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.

Gregg Guest

This latest attempt will go down the sewer just like the last one. Like others have said, there’s a reason why Ryanair and Easyjet haven’t already gone down this foolhardy road. The industry is littered with the carcasses of carriers who have tried this in the past. Fools and their money are soon parted…

1
Justin Guest

I flew from Berlin Brandenburg Airport to New York JFK Airport and back to Berlin Brandenburg Airport in September 2022 for my vacation. As soon as I landed back to Berlin Brandenburg Airport from my holiday in New York, I noticed that my checked-in luggage did not arrive at the airport. The airline lost my luggage in a SIMPLE DIRECT FLIGHT between NEW YORK and BERLIN, it was very difficult to get through to them after NOT ANSWERING emails and calls, then after about 2 weeks, they located my luggage. However, then it took them another 2/3 weeks for them to deliver my luggage because their service is horrible and they were not getting in touch with me regarding my address and information. I tried so many times to call and get an answer from them or an email to check about why my located luggage is not being sent to me, however no answer whatsoever. After contacting some workers on LinkedIn I managed to get some info and got my luggage delivered to me finally! However, when I went to pickup my luggage, I found it partially BROKEN and DAMAGED. Obviously I asked for a compensation form and filled in the amount which was due for items which I had to buy that were in my luggage through the duration that it was missing for about a month. I bought basic day to day stuff like underwear, pants, socks and shirt and some liquids, which amounted to only around 200euros all together. Also, I listed down the cost which was due to me for my broken luggage. However, their customer service, afterwards told me that since I got my luggage back, I am due to no money back whatsoever on items that I bought. Absolutely horrible after all the stress and hassle they passed me through with lot's of my stuff missing. That's not all of it, the cherry on top of the cake is that they blamed me for not having a durable enough luggage to withstand transit and that they WILL NOT REFUND ME for my BROKEN LUGGAGE which they broke due to them not doing a simple task of handling my chcked-in luggage properly. Horrible experience and customer service. I highly do not recommend this airline.

0
Glen Guest

Was a frequent flyer of Norwegian- Austin Texas to London Gatwick. They provided fresh, clean and modern aircraft- With friendly staff- At rates that were impossible to believe. $700 round trip? Please come back to Texas!!!

0
Meet Ben Schlappig, OMAAT Founder
4,788,713 Miles Traveled

27,627,500 Words Written

32,315 Posts Published

Keep Exploring OMAAT
  • October 19, 2022
  • Ben Schlappig
161
How Are Transatlantic Flights Still So Full?!?
  • September 12, 2022
  • Ben Schlappig
55
3 Reasons I Love Rear Facing Business Class Seats
  • August 15, 2022
  • Ben Schlappig
52
Infant Award Travel: Which Airline Is Best?