Uh Oh: Could Airbus Cancel Qatar Airways’ A350 Order?

Uh Oh: Could Airbus Cancel Qatar Airways’ A350 Order?

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Qatar Airways and Airbus have been in a major legal dispute for several months now. A court decision today has major implications, as Qatar Airways may be forced to take delivery of Airbus A350s, or else the planes could be resold to other airlines.

Airbus and Qatar Airways have been engaged in a $600+ million legal dispute, which primarily involves the Airbus A350. Specifically, Qatar Airways has grounded much of its A350 fleet, arguing that the fuselage surface is degrading at an accelerated rate. Airbus, meanwhile, has argued that these issues are cosmetic.

This has caused relations between the airline and aircraft manufacturer to sour significantly, to the point that in January 2022, Airbus decided to terminate its agreement to sell Qatar Airways A321neos. This then caused a major dispute about the legality of this.

In February 2022, a UK judge ordered Airbus to delay reselling these jets to other airlines, pending a hearing. Then in April 2022, it was decided that Airbus was free to resell these jets to other airlines. There’s now a major update regarding the A350 dispute between Qatar Airways and Airbus.

Airbus can terminate A350 contract with Qatar Airways, resell jets

A UK judge has today issued a further ruling in the case between Airbus and Qatar Airways, and it’s not good news for Qatar Airways. While Qatar Airways was granted a speedy trial regarding the overall question of the safety of the Airbus A350, Airbus was also granted a major victory.

Qatar Airways has been refusing to take delivery of new Airbus A350s on safety grounds, but has also requested that Airbus not be able to sell these jets to other airlines. With a judge’s ruling today:

  • Airbus is free to continue delivering these jets to Qatar Airways, triggering payment clauses
  • If Qatar Airways refuses to take delivery of these jets, Airbus is free to resell these jets to other airlines

For context, Qatar Airways currently has 21 Airbus A350-1000s on order, many of which are ready to be delivered to the Doha-based airline. This complements Qatar Airways’ existing A350 fleet, which consists of 34 A350-900s and 19 A350-1000s. However, many of those planes are currently grounded.

Interestingly, given how much money is being spent on this legal battle, the judge said the following during the hearing:

“The costs for both sides are way over the top in my judgment. There is far too much time that is being spent here.”

Qatar Airways could be forced to take delivery of A350s

Qatar Airways is entering uncharted territory

Wide body aircraft manufacturing is a duopoly, with just Airbus and Boeing (for all practical purposes). With Qatar Airways’ relationship with Airbus souring, the airline will essentially just be stuck buying Boeing jets.

I feel like the clock is ticking here on Qatar Airways making up with Airbus:

  • Qatar Airways already had its A321neo order canceled on it, and Airbus could now cancel Qatar Airways’ remaining A350-1000s, which the airline is relying on to be able to continue to grow
  • It’s not like Qatar Airways would have access to any comparable jets from Boeing immediately; the Boeing 777X won’t enter service until at least 2025, and Boeing 787 deliveries have been suspended for now, never mind that there’s a queue for getting these delivered
  • If Qatar Airways can’t get more Airbus jets, the airline will quite literally be relying on leasing planes from other airlines to be able to grow, and that’s not ideal for an airline with a laser focus on a good guest experience

Frankly I’m not really sure what to make of the merit of this dispute:

  • I’m not sure what incentive Qatar Airways would have to make up this claim; the airline has the cash to pay for these jets and desperately wants to expand; leasing planes from other airlines is more costly than just buying these jets new
  • At the same time, Qatar Airways is the only airline to report problems to this extent, and Airbus has a good reputation for safety; I can’t imagine Airbus would be dismissing these claims if the aircraft manufacturer thought there was a real risk, as it would be terrible for Airbus’ reputation if something happened to one of these planes

If Qatar Airways wants any chance of reconciling with Airbus, it seems like taking delivery of these new A350-1000s would make sense. The airline isn’t having this surface issue with new jets, and then hopefully Airbus and Qatar Airways can continue to work toward a resolution.

But if Airbus cancels Qatar Airways’ A350 order (in addition to the A321neo order), there’s really no going back…

Qatar Airways A350-1000 business class

Bottom line

A judge has today ruled that Airbus can force Qatar Airways to take delivery of Airbus A350s, or otherwise sell the jets to other airlines. Qatar Airways has been refusing to take delivery of these planes over claims of the fuselage surface degrading at an accelerated rate, claims that Airbus has denied.

I’m curious to see how this situation plays out from here. If Qatar Airways refuses to take delivery of these jets and Airbus cancels the carrier’s A350 order, Qatar Airways will have some major challenges with growth over the coming years.

Do you think Qatar Airways will agree to take delivery of A350s, or will Airbus cancel this order?

Conversations (44)
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  1. PG Guest

    Good decision. Qatar Airways is just abusing the position and monopoly it has in Qatar. Qatar Aviation Authority is just an extended hand of Al Baker.

  2. Yahia Zaidul Hassain Guest

    This is an interlocutory order I believe. Qatar Airways will appeal against this order I believe.

  3. Yolo Guest

    Incorrect. Other airlines have reported the damage as well.

    1. SNO Guest

      They did and they silently cooperated with the supplier to solve the issue without public drama as it is done in such situations.

  4. Bridgeman Guest

    Maybe the best thing now is for the CEO of Qatar Airways to be eased into early retirement because he clearly can't play rock, paper, scissors in the international arena. With Qatar's enormous wealth, this could have been settled out of court. For the other Gulf countries, it'll be a case of schadenfreude.

  5. GE 227 Guest

    Not only is this an issue seen by several airlines other than Qatar, it is also absolutely not merely a cosmetic issue as Airbus suggests. There are several known facts that support this.

    1. CFRP aircraft fuselages have a limited number of normal repaint opportunities. 2. The exterior includes a fine, metalized grid which is critical to safety, complicating the repaint process on its own, let alone when cracks are seen. 3. All work...

    Not only is this an issue seen by several airlines other than Qatar, it is also absolutely not merely a cosmetic issue as Airbus suggests. There are several known facts that support this.

    1. CFRP aircraft fuselages have a limited number of normal repaint opportunities. 2. The exterior includes a fine, metalized grid which is critical to safety, complicating the repaint process on its own, let alone when cracks are seen. 3. All work and inspections on the airframes in question has been carried out by an approved repainting facility. Qatar has no hand in this.

    1. VL3 Guest

      US and EU civil aviation authorities have made it clear that it is a cosmetic issue but I guess you have some insider information and know better

  6. Razzak Memon Guest

    This is more reason to boycott QR and fly American Airlines. Full Disclosure: I am a CK and my wife is also a CK.

    1. Julia Guest

      Flying AA? You must have very low standards. What is CK?

  7. AT Guest

    Unless I missed this why is SOME of the A350 fleet grounded but others not?
    It seems (largely) that the older models of the -900s and -1000s are grounded but the oldest A350-1000s are newer than the -900s so it can't be just an issue of age.

    The second issue is why is this only affecting QR? (I understand other airlines have also reported problems but not the same extent, and no other...

    Unless I missed this why is SOME of the A350 fleet grounded but others not?
    It seems (largely) that the older models of the -900s and -1000s are grounded but the oldest A350-1000s are newer than the -900s so it can't be just an issue of age.

    The second issue is why is this only affecting QR? (I understand other airlines have also reported problems but not the same extent, and no other airline has grounded the fleet). Could this have something to do with the type of paint that QR uses?

  8. Olivia Guest

    The U.K. judges are obviously bias and sided completely with Airbus. For the sake of expansion, Qatar should just take the order and move on. Leasing airplanes is only a temporary option and is not good financially.

    1. SNO Guest

      Ordering a large, custom made airplane and then reject the delivery of it is different from ordering a pizza and then reject to pay the delivery person due to an olive pointing into the wrong direction.
      Contractual frameworks cover responsibilities of buyer and seller when an item is as expansive as an airplane.
      Calling foul because a judge doesn‘t rule as expected, but according to the contractual framework, is biased toward one of...

      Ordering a large, custom made airplane and then reject the delivery of it is different from ordering a pizza and then reject to pay the delivery person due to an olive pointing into the wrong direction.
      Contractual frameworks cover responsibilities of buyer and seller when an item is as expansive as an airplane.
      Calling foul because a judge doesn‘t rule as expected, but according to the contractual framework, is biased toward one of the conflicting parties!
      In that sense it would be interesting to see your facts for calling the judges being biased. Are you certain, you aren‘t biased toward Qatar Airways?

  9. ChrisGVA Guest

    Anyway QR is going downhill, most of Qsuite promised flight never happens, you just need to read the actual planes swap in the forum.

    We sell you Qsuite flights at premium price, the you will fly with antic Airbus A330 / Boeing 777 old 6 business seat per row.
    There no more refurbishment of the 777 to Qsuite, what QR has been thinking actually ? just live with the (old) hype ?

    And I...

    Anyway QR is going downhill, most of Qsuite promised flight never happens, you just need to read the actual planes swap in the forum.

    We sell you Qsuite flights at premium price, the you will fly with antic Airbus A330 / Boeing 777 old 6 business seat per row.
    There no more refurbishment of the 777 to Qsuite, what QR has been thinking actually ? just live with the (old) hype ?

    And I don't talk about the devaluation of the QR FF, no more space availability, huge cost compared with before the Avios change, still abysmal customer service.

    QR lost their case VS Airbus ? that's perfect, it's long enough that the passengers suffer about this story.
    There no plane who crash because painting problem on composite material....
    And I don't care about the painting when I'm seating inside the plane, but I care about my money and get a subpar business experience.

    1. Sergio Guest

      Is not that the a350 would crash, but that it put it vulnerable to things like storms for example. And next time you select business class, I just have tell you to take your time and analyze about the airlines and what may be happening. That way, you can choose what you like without much disappointment.

    2. AlaskaFlyer1 New Member

      "And I don't care about the painting when I'm seating inside the plane, but I care about my money and get a subpar business experience." -- yikes, I think you're missing the entire point of this article.

  10. Aman Guest

    I am in no position to comment on the technical merits on either side. However I certainly can’t take Airbus at face value.
    Tim Clarke in a recent interview said he empathised with his “neighbour” and has told Airbus that Emirates would nor accept such defects.
    While we have been conditioned to trust large conglomerates and take their representations at face value however as we have learnt we cannot always do so- eg...

    I am in no position to comment on the technical merits on either side. However I certainly can’t take Airbus at face value.
    Tim Clarke in a recent interview said he empathised with his “neighbour” and has told Airbus that Emirates would nor accept such defects.
    While we have been conditioned to trust large conglomerates and take their representations at face value however as we have learnt we cannot always do so- eg the max fiasco. Regulators too are often in bed with these oligopolistic entities.
    It is tempting to dismiss Qatar’s stance given the animated disposition of its CEO and the defects are in all likelihood not such a big deal. However, given the billions of dollars spent on the development of the A350, it somehow seems bizarre how Airbus could have overlooked something so basic.
    The 787 though isn’t exactly flawless either. Perhaps it’s time to have a third aircraft manufacturer.

    1. Watson Gold

      > we have been conditioned to trust large conglomerates and take their representations at face value

      I don't think that's particularly true. It's just that in this case it's one large conglomerate vs another, and choosing a side to believe is a matter of "cui bono". It's fairly easy to see the gamesmanship from Qatar's side, whereas it's hard to imagine Airbus' angle. If they knew the planes weren't airworthy, they could have quietly fixed...

      > we have been conditioned to trust large conglomerates and take their representations at face value

      I don't think that's particularly true. It's just that in this case it's one large conglomerate vs another, and choosing a side to believe is a matter of "cui bono". It's fairly easy to see the gamesmanship from Qatar's side, whereas it's hard to imagine Airbus' angle. If they knew the planes weren't airworthy, they could have quietly fixed them rather than letting it blow up into a public spectacle and risk a disaster.

  11. Tim Dunn Diamond

    Just as with every other major contract, there are and should be performance clauses for Airbus aircraft - which is exactly why other airlines aren't making a huge production about the paint issues on the A350. Similar problems have happened on the B787.
    Unless Qatar wants to buy aircraft from the Chinese, they best figure out how to deal w/ product issues the way every other airline has - including the massive delivery delays...

    Just as with every other major contract, there are and should be performance clauses for Airbus aircraft - which is exactly why other airlines aren't making a huge production about the paint issues on the A350. Similar problems have happened on the B787.
    Unless Qatar wants to buy aircraft from the Chinese, they best figure out how to deal w/ product issues the way every other airline has - including the massive delivery delays of Boeing widebodies - quietly and with the manufacturer.

    1. Pierre Guest

      It will be at least decades (hopefully centuries) before China can produce a B777 or A350 equivalent. Their C919 is 1980's first A320s stolen technology. These countries (Russia too) are colossi with feet of clay. Once the 232 western planes stolen by Putin start needing maintenance and crashing, Russian air transport will grind to a bloody halt.

      If Qatar loses the A350 too, they will not only wait a long time for their Boeings, they...

      It will be at least decades (hopefully centuries) before China can produce a B777 or A350 equivalent. Their C919 is 1980's first A320s stolen technology. These countries (Russia too) are colossi with feet of clay. Once the 232 western planes stolen by Putin start needing maintenance and crashing, Russian air transport will grind to a bloody halt.

      If Qatar loses the A350 too, they will not only wait a long time for their Boeings, they will pay a fortune for them. For me, the Qatar Airways decline started when they launched Business Class Light.

  12. Giovanni Del Vecchio Guest

    The golden rule, especially in aviation is:
    "Customer is king".
    Now, if you pay several billion euros for a new fleet of A350, and after a while you see the painting in the conditions we were shown by Qatar Airline, the OEM can't dismiss the issue just as "aesthetics".
    It is a matter of respect and objectivity.
    It is clear that, at least, there is a serious issue with the coating...

    The golden rule, especially in aviation is:
    "Customer is king".
    Now, if you pay several billion euros for a new fleet of A350, and after a while you see the painting in the conditions we were shown by Qatar Airline, the OEM can't dismiss the issue just as "aesthetics".
    It is a matter of respect and objectivity.
    It is clear that, at least, there is a serious issue with the coating and painting process.
    And it must be not a trivial one.
    Airbus, despite all the internal company hub advertising about the fact that the "Customer is our focus", actually, and not only in this case, shows complete disregard for the leggitime quest for thorough investigation by Qatar airline.
    Overall the matter has been managed very badly by Airbus top management, and at the end the trial costs and reputation damage will by far outweight the victory gained in tribunal.
    I don' t know why Airbus behaves like this any time there is a safety or a quality issue with their products, and it is not the first time, see e.g.:
    1) The Air France A330 which crashed into the sea more than 10 years ago out of the Brasil coast, where all passangers died.
    The real cause, a failure in the pitot and attitude control system, was masked very well by the official outcome report of the french investigation agency, which stated there was a "lack of training" of the pilots in emergency situations.
    2) The Airbus Helicopter AH225 which lost the rotor (!) near the Norway coast, causing all passengers to die.
    The cause was a lot of gearboxes from a supplier which was not up to the specifications and a AH225 gearbox design mistake.
    Still after years from this offshore tragedy in Norway, Airbus has always refused to admit the mistake and the need to re-design the AH225 gearbox for more safety, adding instead to the AH225 gearbox and rotor system a very questionable warning system which should alert the pilot in case of danger of gearbox failure.
    To some extent, Airbus behave like the Catholic Church, who never admit any mistake and always deny any misuse or misbehaviour of the priests or, worse, try to sand the truth.
    I guess it is a ethic and moral characteristic of the predominant french and spanish culture at Airbus.

    1. SNO Guest

      You‘re dealing rather liberal with the reality, picking and choosing, when it suites you, ignoring when it doesn‘t. I don‘t have stock in Airbus, but fact remains, the A330 stalled down from travel altitude into the sea due to a junior pilot on the right seat, who was overwhelmed and panicked. The cockpit voice recorder has recorded the whole event. The pilot in the left seat should never have been allowed into the cockpit of...

      You‘re dealing rather liberal with the reality, picking and choosing, when it suites you, ignoring when it doesn‘t. I don‘t have stock in Airbus, but fact remains, the A330 stalled down from travel altitude into the sea due to a junior pilot on the right seat, who was overwhelmed and panicked. The cockpit voice recorder has recorded the whole event. The pilot in the left seat should never have been allowed into the cockpit of an airliner, he wasn‘t able to handle the stress in an extrem situation. You might want to read the accident report for further information.
      The AH225 accident was tragic, but going by your logic would be like blaming Boeing for the downfall of Norwegian Airline due to the grounding of the 787, when it was the engine maker RR, who was responsible for the grounding.
      About Qatar - Airbus offered to fix the A350 at no cost under warranty. At the end even the Airbus CEO went to Al Baker, but Qatar rejected and instead the A350 got declared as not airworthy by the Qatari Aviation Authority, what is a misrepresentation of Airbus and its product.
      Did it ever occur to you, that a cash strapped Boeing needed a customer to finance the 777X freighter development? They have already several big defense contracts with the Qatari, getting business for the delayed 777X project was certainly welcome. Too bad Airbus didn‘t play as planned.

      The damaged paint on Qatar‘s A350‘s is not looking nice, but that doesn‘t justify to discredit and damage Airbus‘s worldwide business in pursue of their own agenda, whatever this agenda is.

    2. Giovanni Del Vecchio Guest

      I reported only facts, sadly, for Airbus.
      For instance, how Airbus Helicopters design capability in Merignane was "screwed out" after the H225 accident in Norway because of Airbus lack of intellectual honesty, can be seen by the "flop" of their following new model, the H160.
      You can cheat the authorities, but not the civil market where there is freedom of choice.
      In 4 years, AH could not secure one order in civil...

      I reported only facts, sadly, for Airbus.
      For instance, how Airbus Helicopters design capability in Merignane was "screwed out" after the H225 accident in Norway because of Airbus lack of intellectual honesty, can be seen by the "flop" of their following new model, the H160.
      You can cheat the authorities, but not the civil market where there is freedom of choice.
      In 4 years, AH could not secure one order in civil market for the H160, so they begged the french army to buy the military version (... still to be developed) of the H160 and keep the assembly line in Marignane alive.
      Same for H225, only military version at very low price, basically gifted, could be placed to singapore army.
      Recently Australia did not renew the Tiger contract, due to unbearable lack of reliability of their machines, and selected the Boeing Apaches instead.
      In Germany, reports of the Army claimed that less of 50% of the Tigers are "combat ready", for the same reason.
      The only models Airbus Helicopters is able to sell in the civil market are AH 135 and AH 145 family, i.e. the last machines designed by Airbus Helicopters in Germany, at Donauworth.
      These are facts, SNO.

    3. SNO Guest

      Write less and read more!
      The H160 was almost 7 years in development after the first flight, but now serial production started with 35 choppers per year initially. They right now have almost 90 orders in their books, many from the oil and gas industry. They are waiting for FFA approval to start deliveries into the US.

      The tiger? How old is the tiger? Is it an Airbus main stream product? It’s the same...

      Write less and read more!
      The H160 was almost 7 years in development after the first flight, but now serial production started with 35 choppers per year initially. They right now have almost 90 orders in their books, many from the oil and gas industry. They are waiting for FFA approval to start deliveries into the US.

      The tiger? How old is the tiger? Is it an Airbus main stream product? It’s the same with blaming Airbus for the gearbox issues, when it’s the subcontractor in reality. Get your act together before you write.

      Please be reminded, that this article is about the A350, and Qatar’s attitude toward it’s supplier Airbus. Airbus helicopters and your vendetta against them belongs somewhere else, not into this article.

      You must be smoking a real strong kraut to get this lost within your sad Airbus facts.

  13. Dealgrabber Guest

    Lucky, there are other operators who reported this issue on their A350.

  14. jerome Meyer Guest

    Boeing is the way to go for Qatar.

    Who knows how long these low rent 350's will last. Many airlines have complained about Airbus substandard paint jobs.

    1. Watson Gold

      Oh no, how will the plane fly with an ugly paint job?

  15. Jerome meyer Guest

    Airbus is just trying to screw Qatar. If I was Qatar I would go with an all Boeing fleet. The 787's will be ready soon and Boeing could also supply Qatar with (passenger) 777's. Boeing builds better planes anyway.

    1. SNO Guest

      Are you certain Qatar has enough demand to fill the 777-9? Don‘t forget the 777-9 is as big as it is to match the efficiency of the A350-1000. A 80% filled 777-9 would be a 100% filled A350-1000, what equals with more earnings by operating the A350.

    2. Julia Guest

      It's good that you are not in charge of any airline. For your info, Boeing is experiencing major delivery delays. Idiot

  16. Ken Guest

    What incentive qr has? Well, albakers ego! He is so cheap that he wanted to make a good deal out of the paint problem during the pandemic when he didn't need so many airplanes and he could do that back then because airlines had a lot of say for Boeing and Airbus but that's not the case. Now can albaker really drop his ego and accept this failure? Not so sure...

  17. Donna Diamond

    My reading of the tea leaves is that Airbus will cancel and sell to other airlines.

  18. Stanley Guest

    Someone wrote "Karen Al Baker" should stop complaining and take accept deliveries of these cutting edger A350 planes

  19. Sam Guest

    Airbus has had enough with QR and rightly so. Airbus should not have problems selling these frames though discounted. Airbus would probably prefer to resell these planes and avoid any future problems with QR.

    I think that QR will have a rethink, make-up with Airbus and continue getting the planes. It's only other option is buying used 777-300ERs/LR and pimping them for use till the 777-9 sees the light of day if that ever happens.

  20. Chandan Bhat Gold

    "At the same time, Qatar Airways is the only airline to report these problems" Nope, not really, multiple airlines have reported the issue, it's just that Qatar Airways is the only one to do so publicly and be so vocal about it.

    Reuters Article for Reference : https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/costly-airbus-paint-flaw-goes-wider-than-gulf-2021-11-29/

    1. Chandan Bhat Gold

      Further, quoting from the reuters article : "Messages show Finnair (FIA1S.HE), which operates in the colder north, raised paint concerns as early as 2016, and reported in October 2019 that damage had spread below to the anti-lightning mesh.

      Cathay Pacific (0293.HK), Etihad, Lufthansa (LHAG.DE) and Air France (AIRF.PA) - acting in its capacity as maintenance provider for Air Caraibes - also complained of paint damage."

    2. Peter Guest

      As the other airlines continue to receive and operate the A350's, several of these ranked the safest airlines in the world and thus take anything seriously, this doesn't sound very good for Qatar Airways in this dispute.

      It sounds more like Airbus has had enough of BS and the Middle East in general is used to get whatever they want so it's unlikely to end well -- for QR.

    3. Adam Simmons Guest

      Don't all airlines operate in the cold, with temperatures at cruising altitude a long way below freezing?

  21. John Guest

    What happens to the interior? Would Airbus have to swap it if it sells these frames to another airline or would another airline especially buy the jet with Q Suites?

  22. Luke Guest

    I guess the current crazy oil prices is giving QR a lot more money provided to pay the legal fees for this hehe (I'm sure the government is paying)

    1. Eve Guest

      Qatar is not really an oil producing country, majority of its export and condition is gas. In fact domestically there energy consumption is 99% gas and less then 1% oil

    2. Ken Guest

      Not really. The original comment is about revenue from the oil. Actually Qatar's gdps 2/3 is coming from oil, although it has a large natural gas reserve and export. Gas is very costly to produce and transport so it doesn't make as much money as oil.

    3. Eve Guest

      Liquified Natural Gas is pretty easy to transport in modern times. Besides that Qatar has huge regional LNG importers including India, China and of all places eastern Asian countries.
      Also you are wrong, 2/3 Qatar GDP is not at all coming from oil, that statistics is 20 years old! It barely produces the fraction of LNG it produces or its regional OPEC members does.

      I would give this two a read:
      (Economic outlook...

      Liquified Natural Gas is pretty easy to transport in modern times. Besides that Qatar has huge regional LNG importers including India, China and of all places eastern Asian countries.
      Also you are wrong, 2/3 Qatar GDP is not at all coming from oil, that statistics is 20 years old! It barely produces the fraction of LNG it produces or its regional OPEC members does.

      I would give this two a read:
      (Economic outlook forecast by gov)
      https://www.psa.gov.qa/en/knowledge/Doc/QEO/English_QEO_2021-2023.pdf

      (Post covid recovery outlook)
      https://www.pwc.com/m1/en/publications/qatar-economy-watch-2021/macroeconomic-developments.html

    4. Eve Guest

      consumption* (not condition)

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Chandan Bhat Gold

Further, quoting from the reuters article : "Messages show Finnair (FIA1S.HE), which operates in the colder north, raised paint concerns as early as 2016, and reported in October 2019 that damage had spread below to the anti-lightning mesh. Cathay Pacific (0293.HK), Etihad, Lufthansa (LHAG.DE) and Air France (AIRF.PA) - acting in its capacity as maintenance provider for Air Caraibes - also complained of paint damage."

2
Chandan Bhat Gold

"At the same time, Qatar Airways is the only airline to report these problems" Nope, not really, multiple airlines have reported the issue, it's just that Qatar Airways is the only one to do so publicly and be so vocal about it. Reuters Article for Reference : https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/costly-airbus-paint-flaw-goes-wider-than-gulf-2021-11-29/

2
Eve Guest

Qatar is not really an oil producing country, majority of its export and condition is gas. In fact domestically there energy consumption is 99% gas and less then 1% oil

2
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