Is Earning Delta SkyMiles Elite Status With Credit Cards Worth It?

Is Earning Delta SkyMiles Elite Status With Credit Cards Worth It?

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American Express and Delta have a portfolio of co-branded credit cards. One of the useful features of the premium versions of these cards is that they can help you earn Medallion elite status in the Delta SkyMiles program.

Delta lets you spend your way toward status, and in theory, you could even earn top-tier status with Delta exclusively through credit card spending. Delta used to be the only one of the “big three” US carriers to allow this, though with American AAdvantage introducing Loyalty Points, you can also earn AAdvantage elite status with credit card spending.

There’s no airline in the United States I’d rather fly consistently than Delta, and in the past I’ve often considered trying to spend my way toward status with Delta. That’s something I’m considering less now, as I generally find elite status to be less valuable than it used to be, and also because the opportunity cost of spending on airline co-branded credit cards is big.

In this post, I wanted to take a close look at the current state of earning Delta Medallion elite status through credit card spending, especially in light of the current elevated bonuses we’re seeing on Delta credit cards.

Delta SkyMiles Medallion status requirements

Delta SkyMiles has four Medallion elite tiers, with the following annual qualification requirements:

  • Delta Silver Medallion requires 25,000 MQMs OR 30 MQSs AND 3,000 MQDs
  • Delta Gold Medallion requires 50,000 MQMs OR 60 MQSs AND 6,000 MQDs
  • Delta Platinum Medallion requires 75,000 MQMs OR 100 MQSs AND 9,000 MQDs
  • Delta Diamond Medallion requires 125,000 MQMs OR 140 MQSs AND 15,000 MQDs

For those not familiar with MQMs, MQSs, or MQDs:

  • MQMs are Medallion Qualifying Miles, which refer to the number of elite miles you earn (this can vary based on the type of ticket you’re booking, so you don’t always earn one MQM per mile flown)
  • MQSs are Medallion Qualifying Segments, which refer to the number of elite segments you earn (again, you don’t always earn one MQS per segment flown, as it varies based on the type of fare)
  • MQDs are Medallion Qualifying Dollars, which refer to how much you have to spend on your ticket to earn status; taxes and many fees are excluded from this total
Delta Boeing 737 & Boeing 757

Delta Amex Medallion Qualifying Dollar waiver

You can get a waiver on the MQD requirement with Delta Amex credit cards, as follows:

  • You can get the MQD requirement waived for Silver, Gold, and Platinum status, if you spend at least $25,000 on a Platinum or Reserve Delta Amex during the calendar year
  • You can get the MQD requirement waived for Diamond status if you spend at least $250,000 on a Platinum or Reserve Delta Amex during the calendar year
  • If you have multiple cards, spending across the cards counts toward the waiver
Delta Airbus A350 business class

Earning Delta MQMs with credit card spending

There are opportunities to earn MQMs for spending on an ongoing basis with Delta’s premium Amex cards. Let’s look at how that differs across the Platinum and Reserve cards, as you earn MQMs at different rates.

Delta Platinum Amex MQMs for spending

The Delta SkyMiles® Platinum American Express Card (review) and Delta SkyMiles® Platinum Business American Express Card (review) offer the following for ongoing spending:

  • Earn 10,000 bonus MQMs after spending $25,000
  • Earn an additional 10,000 bonus MQMs after spending $50,000

That means spending $50,000 on either of the cards would earn you 20,000 MQMs, or if you spent $50,000 on both of these cards you’d earn 40,000 MQMs.

Delta Reserve Amex MQMs for spending

The Delta SkyMiles® Reserve American Express Card (review) and Delta SkyMiles® Reserve Business American Express Card (review) offer the following for ongoing spending:

  • Earn 15,000 bonus MQMs after spending $30,000
  • Earn an additional 15,000 bonus MQMs after spending $60,000
  • Earn an additional 15,000 bonus MQMs after spending $90,000
  • Earn an additional 15,000 bonus MQMs after spending $120,000

That means spending $120,000 on either of these cards would earn you a bonus of 60,000 MQMs, and if you spent $240,000 on both of the cards you’d earn a total of 120,000 MQMs.

Delta Airbus A320 first class

Crunching numbers on Delta credit card spending

Ignoring any welcome bonuses (since those are “once in a lifetime”), on an annual basis you can earn:

  • 20,000 bonus MQMs for spending $50,000 on each of the Delta Platinum cards
  • 60,000 bonus MQMs for spending $120,000 on each of the Delta Reserve cards

If you want to earn MQMs as efficiently as possible, the Reserve is the way to go, since you’re earning half an MQM per dollar spent, in the right increments.

$120,000 of spending earns you 60,000 MQMs, and if you had both the personal and business version, you’d be looking at 120,000 MQMs for $240,000 of spending.

These are obviously huge amounts to spend and it won’t be possible for everyone, but I know plenty of people who spend a lot on credit cards through reimbursable business expenses, etc., so something like this could make a lot of sense.

Using credit cards to earn Delta Silver, Gold, or Platinum status

I’d say earning Delta SkyMiles Medallion Silver, Gold, or Platinum status is extremely attainable with the help of credit cards. For one, you can knock out the MQD requirement (which is a major roadblock for people) by spending $25,000 on the Platinum or Reserve products.

Even taking a simple strategy, if you spent $60,000 on a Delta Reserve Card you’d be earning 30,000 MQMs:

  • That’s more than enough for Silver status
  • That puts you 20,000 MQMs from Gold status
  • That puts you 45,000 MQMs from Platinum status
Delta Boeing 737 first class

Using credit cards to earn Delta Diamond status

Earning Delta SkyMiles Medallion Diamond status through credit cards takes a bit more commitment.

The first thing to keep in mind is that Diamond status requires either 15,000 MQDs (meaning you have to spend $15,000 on Delta ticket purchases in a year, before taxes and fees), or you need to spend $250,000 on credit cards annually to get that waived.

In many ways, if you want to earn Diamond status with the help of credit cards, you should go “all-in” (though there’s a huge opportunity cost to that). The best strategy for going all-in here is to:

  • Spend $240,000 across the personal and business Reserve cards, so you’d be looking at earning 120,000 MQMs
  • You’d then want to spend an extra $10,000 to get the MQD waiver (you’d then be spending $250,000 per year on these cards), so that you don’t have to spend $15,000 on Delta flights to earn Diamond status

You’d then be just 5,000 MQMs short of earning Diamond status, which should be easy. Of course, there are some huge catches here:

  • There’s a massive opportunity cost to spending that much on a Delta card, since you can earn more valuable rewards with other cards
  • You have to decide how much value you’d actually get out of Diamond status; if you take just a few flights per year with Delta, it’s probably not worth it

Share your Delta Medallion MQMs with others

If you earn Delta MQMs through credit card spending, you can actually share those with others. That’s to say that you can choose for what account you want to redeem those MQMs. You can have your spouse, parent, sibling, friend, etc., open up a card, and then they could give you MQMs.

Delta 737
Delta 737

Delta offers rollover Medallion MQMs

Delta offers rollover MQMs, so if you over qualify for a status level over the course of a year, whatever miles you earn above a particular status level roll over to the following year.

For example, if you end the year with 45,000 MQMs you’d earn Silver status, but that only requires 25,000 MQMs. So 20,000 MQMs would roll over to the next year.

That can play into this strategy as well.

Opportunity cost of credit card spending

The best return on spending if you’re trying to earn Delta SkyMiles Medallion elite status is with the Delta Reserve Card. Let’s say you spend $120,000 on the card in a year, and earn 60,000 MQMs.

Spending $120,000 would earn you a total of 120,000 redeemable SkyMiles and 60,000 MQMs. I value SkyMiles at ~1.1 cents each, so to me that’s ~$1,320 of “concrete” value in miles, plus the value of the MQMs.

Then you have to consider the alternatives, which would probably be one of the best credit cards for everyday spending:

To simplify it even further, at certain thresholds of spending you’re earning one SkyMile and 0.5 MQMs per dollar spent.

If you value SkyMiles at 1.1 cents and consider the opportunity cost of spending to be 2.55-3.4%, you’re essentially paying 2.9-4.6 cents per MQM. At that rate that’s the equivalent of “paying” ~$3,625-5,750 for Diamond status.

That’s not accounting for the annual fee on the cards either, since everyone will account for those costs differently, based on how much value they get out of card perks.

Bottom line

Delta makes it fairly attainable to earn SkyMiles Medallion elite status exclusively through credit card spending, or through a combination of credit card spending and flying. At a minimum, having a co-branded credit card with MQM earning potential can greatly help you earn Silver, Gold, or Platinum Medallion status.

However, for the really hardcore credit card spender, putting enough spending on Delta co-branded credit cards could earn you Diamond status. You’d want to spend at least $250,000 so you could get the MQD waiver, but that would make the status quite attainable beyond that.

If you want to earn Delta SkyMiles Medallion status, then the Delta SkyMiles® Reserve American Express Card and Delta SkyMiles® Reserve Business American Express Card are the cards you should be considering.

To Delta loyalists, to what extent do you use Delta Amex cards to earn Medallion status?

Conversations (6)
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  1. Chet New Member

    I live in a city where it makes sense to have Delta Status, although I essentially defaulted into Delta after Midwest Express was sold. I generally redeem for economy flights. I usually get about 1.3 to 1.4 cents per point on redemption, but sometimes it is a lot more. So, that changes the calculations a little for the 1.1 cent valuation, which is lower than what I would use to redeem miles. I had the...

    I live in a city where it makes sense to have Delta Status, although I essentially defaulted into Delta after Midwest Express was sold. I generally redeem for economy flights. I usually get about 1.3 to 1.4 cents per point on redemption, but sometimes it is a lot more. So, that changes the calculations a little for the 1.1 cent valuation, which is lower than what I would use to redeem miles. I had the Delta Reserve Business Card for many years. After they got rid of mileage boost, it no longer made sense to keep the card. I still have the Platinum Card, and that is a good card to have for those of us who have accrued a lot of rollover MQMs for the last two years. The $25K mileage waiver for Platinum status is very helpful. Also, 2 points for Groceries and Restaurants, although maybe not the best, (I value about 2.6 cents per dollar (1.3 x 2 = 2.6)), is not much of a variance from other cards. If you are going to splurge for first class flights, then the Delta elite benefits are not important. But if you fly economy, and like lounge access on international flights (including partner lounges), choosing a better seat upon purchase of a ticket, and complimentary upgrades, the Delta Platinum card still makes sense. The companion certificates probably justify the annual fee. If you do not fly Delta regularly, then the status is not that helpful. However, if you make several international flights a year, then status makes the trip more pleasant. I also do get a lot of first class upgrades on short domestic flights, even though I really do not care all that much about first class on short flights.

  2. EndlosLuft Guest

    Unless you fly a lot on Delta it makes no sense to care about Delta elite status. You can get equivalent top tier status with another Sky Team carrier. I used to fly a lot of United and went out of my way to fly United. With the gutting of United's frequent flyer program and the devolution of miles, no accountability (dynamic pricing) for awards, following Delta's "lead" I concentrated my spend on International carriers....

    Unless you fly a lot on Delta it makes no sense to care about Delta elite status. You can get equivalent top tier status with another Sky Team carrier. I used to fly a lot of United and went out of my way to fly United. With the gutting of United's frequent flyer program and the devolution of miles, no accountability (dynamic pricing) for awards, following Delta's "lead" I concentrated my spend on International carriers.

    You are talking about spending up to $250,000 on a credit card to earn a top tier Sky Team level. if you have that kind of money to spend you can instead spend a fraction of that on strategic international business class travel on a different Sky Team airline and then have lounge access, etc. But at the end of the day who needs status or miles when you can afford to find a well priced business class ticket on any carrier.

    I don't have 250,000 to spend but am currently the equivalent of Delta's top tier on all of the three major airline alliances without major spend. If I was spending 250,000 I wouldn't spend that money on a Delta Sky Pesos card. Capital One X, Chase Sapphire Reserve even the Hyatt card (actually valuable program) would in my opinion bring a lot more value than anything that Delta has to offer.

    Agree that Delta is a decent carrier when they aren't loosing my luggage and fly them frequently but I always credit and earn with a different Sky Team carrier. #freeagent

    1. Eskimo Guest

      While I do support the #freeagent thing.

      I think you underestimate the power of having top tier status.
      Just because you are flying premium cabin doesn't mean they treat you as good as their top tier. You might get almost the same day of travel benefits, but not the experience.

      They really do bend the rules for their top tier elite. And AA DL UA top tier can attest to that.

      Is it worth...

      While I do support the #freeagent thing.

      I think you underestimate the power of having top tier status.
      Just because you are flying premium cabin doesn't mean they treat you as good as their top tier. You might get almost the same day of travel benefits, but not the experience.

      They really do bend the rules for their top tier elite. And AA DL UA top tier can attest to that.

      Is it worth trying to spend $250k on credit cards to get an extra 50k+ MQM and hold Diamond, probably not.
      But if you're already 'flying' 125k MQM but short on MQD, and have no trouble allocating $250k, then give it a shot.

  3. iamhere Guest

    "I generally find elite status to be less valuable than it used to be, and also because the opportunity cost of spending on airline co-branded credit cards is big." This statement sums up why spending so much money on any airline co-branded credit card is not a good idea.

    Your assessment on the Freedom card is not actually correct if you pair it with the Sapphire or Reserve cards depending how you redeem. For example,...

    "I generally find elite status to be less valuable than it used to be, and also because the opportunity cost of spending on airline co-branded credit cards is big." This statement sums up why spending so much money on any airline co-branded credit card is not a good idea.

    Your assessment on the Freedom card is not actually correct if you pair it with the Sapphire or Reserve cards depending how you redeem. For example, if you redeem $120,000 of spending with Chase travel on the Reserve card then it would be worth 2.25% ~ $2,700.

    You also probably only list paid listings in one's alternative options because there are at least two credit cards that you can earn more than the ones you listed, but I hardly see them listed on your blog.

  4. Steve Guest

    Absolutely worth it!!

    Thank You

  5. Jimmy’s Travel Report Gold

    Did Delta status for years, finally gave up as Delta Skymiles program has gone to the dogs. My advice (after 10 years of Delta high end status), purchase domestic Delta F tickets when desired, and pledge allegiance to United, American or Alaska.

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Eskimo Guest

While I do support the #freeagent thing. I think you underestimate the power of having top tier status. Just because you are flying premium cabin doesn't mean they treat you as good as their top tier. You might get almost the same day of travel benefits, but not the experience. They really do bend the rules for their top tier elite. And AA DL UA top tier can attest to that. Is it worth trying to spend $250k on credit cards to get an extra 50k+ MQM and hold Diamond, probably not. But if you're already 'flying' 125k MQM but short on MQD, and have no trouble allocating $250k, then give it a shot.

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Chet New Member

I live in a city where it makes sense to have Delta Status, although I essentially defaulted into Delta after Midwest Express was sold. I generally redeem for economy flights. I usually get about 1.3 to 1.4 cents per point on redemption, but sometimes it is a lot more. So, that changes the calculations a little for the 1.1 cent valuation, which is lower than what I would use to redeem miles. I had the Delta Reserve Business Card for many years. After they got rid of mileage boost, it no longer made sense to keep the card. I still have the Platinum Card, and that is a good card to have for those of us who have accrued a lot of rollover MQMs for the last two years. The $25K mileage waiver for Platinum status is very helpful. Also, 2 points for Groceries and Restaurants, although maybe not the best, (I value about 2.6 cents per dollar (1.3 x 2 = 2.6)), is not much of a variance from other cards. If you are going to splurge for first class flights, then the Delta elite benefits are not important. But if you fly economy, and like lounge access on international flights (including partner lounges), choosing a better seat upon purchase of a ticket, and complimentary upgrades, the Delta Platinum card still makes sense. The companion certificates probably justify the annual fee. If you do not fly Delta regularly, then the status is not that helpful. However, if you make several international flights a year, then status makes the trip more pleasant. I also do get a lot of first class upgrades on short domestic flights, even though I really do not care all that much about first class on short flights.

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EndlosLuft Guest

Unless you fly a lot on Delta it makes no sense to care about Delta elite status. You can get equivalent top tier status with another Sky Team carrier. I used to fly a lot of United and went out of my way to fly United. With the gutting of United's frequent flyer program and the devolution of miles, no accountability (dynamic pricing) for awards, following Delta's "lead" I concentrated my spend on International carriers. You are talking about spending up to $250,000 on a credit card to earn a top tier Sky Team level. if you have that kind of money to spend you can instead spend a fraction of that on strategic international business class travel on a different Sky Team airline and then have lounge access, etc. But at the end of the day who needs status or miles when you can afford to find a well priced business class ticket on any carrier. I don't have 250,000 to spend but am currently the equivalent of Delta's top tier on all of the three major airline alliances without major spend. If I was spending 250,000 I wouldn't spend that money on a Delta Sky Pesos card. Capital One X, Chase Sapphire Reserve even the Hyatt card (actually valuable program) would in my opinion bring a lot more value than anything that Delta has to offer. Agree that Delta is a decent carrier when they aren't loosing my luggage and fly them frequently but I always credit and earn with a different Sky Team carrier. #freeagent

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