Singapore Airlines Expanding In New York With 3x Daily Flights

Singapore Airlines Expanding In New York With 3x Daily Flights

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As noted by Mainly Miles, Singapore Airlines will be operating its biggest-ever schedule to New York as of this spring, which is interesting timing.

Singapore Airlines is growing in New York

For the first time ever, Singapore Airlines will operate three daily flights to New York area airports as of late March 2022. Specifically, Singapore Airlines will operate the following services:

  • A nonstop Singapore (SIN) to New York (JFK) flight using an Airbus A350-900ULR
  • A nonstop Singapore (SIN) to Newark (EWR) flight using an Airbus A350-900ULR
  • A Singapore (SIN) to New York (JFK) via Frankfurt (FRA) flight using an Airbus A380

What’s changing here is that this will be the first time we see the airline operate 2x daily nonstop flights from Singapore to the New York area. Pre-pandemic the nonstop service was operated to Newark. Then when the route restarted during the pandemic, the nonstop service was shifted to New York JFK. Soon it’ll be operated to both airports.

Let’s go over the details of the three services, with all routes noted operating as of March 27, 2022.

Singapore Airlines’ nonstop flight to New York (JFK)

Singapore Airlines will operate a daily nonstop flight from Singapore to New York with the following schedule:

SQ24 Singapore to New York departing 11:50AM arriving 6:30PM
SQ23 New York to Singapore departing 10:30PM arriving 5:20AM (+2 days)

At 9,537 miles, this is the world’s longest flight. It’s blocked at 18hr40min to New York and 18hr50min to Singapore. Singapore Airlines will use an uber-premium A350-900ULR for the route, featuring just 161 seats. This includes 67 business class seats and 94 premium economy seats.

Singapore Airlines’ A350-900ULR premium economy

Singapore Airlines’ nonstop flight to Newark (EWR)

Singapore Airlines will operate a daily nonstop flight from Singapore to Newark with the following schedule:

SQ22 Singapore to Newark departing 11:35PM arriving 6:00AM (+1 day)
SQ21 Newark to Singapore departing 10:25AM arriving 5:10PM (+1 day)

At 9,523 miles, this is the world’s second longest flight. It’s blocked at 18hr25min to Newark and 18hr45min to Singapore. Singapore Airlines will also use an A350-900ULR for the route, featuring just 161 seats. This includes 67 business class seats and 94 premium economy seats.

Singapore Airlines’ A350-900ULR business class

Singapore Airlines’ flight to New York (JFK) via Frankfurt (FRA)

Singapore Airlines will operate a daily flight from Singapore to New York via Frankfurt (with fifth freedom rights on the transatlantic flight) with the following schedule:

SQ26 Singapore to Frankfurt departing 11:55PM arriving 6:45AM (+1 day)
SQ26 Frankfurt to New York departing 8:35AM arriving 11:10AM
SQ25 New York to Frankfurt departing 8:55PM arriving 10:40AM (+1 day)
SQ25 Frankfurt to Singapore departing 12:30PM arriving 6:50AM (+1 day)

Singapore Airlines will use an Airbus A380 for the route featuring the carrier’s newest cabins. This includes 475 seats spread across four cabins. There are six first class suites, 82 business class seats, 44 premium economy seats, and 343 economy seats.

Singapore Airlines’ A380 Suites

My take on Singapore Airlines’ New York expansion

It’s cool to see Singapore Airlines expanding to this degree in New York, and offering its biggest-ever schedule. In particular, it’s nice how the schedules between EWR and JFK are kind of opposite of one another, so that passengers can choose what works best for them.

Personally I’d rather fly to JFK and from EWR based on the schedules. These are such long flights, and I don’t love boarding late at night, being in darkness endlessly, and then landing at the destination early in the morning. This is a case where I’d much rather have the flight partly be daytime.

Next, I have to say that I’m surprised to see this expansion:

  • Business travel is still a long way from recovering to pre-pandemic levels, so it’s interesting that Singapore Airlines will offer the most capacity we’ve ever seen between New York and Singapore
  • That doesn’t even account for Singapore’s borders still not being fully open, and for that matter the country has limited its current Vaccinated Travel Lane (VTL) concept
  • I have to imagine that cargo is expected to contribute significantly to the viability of these nonstop flights (and that’s despite the fact that cargo capacity is limited on the A350-900ULRs, given how much fuel they’re carrying)

I’m curious to see if this service sticks around in the long-run, or if this is just the best option at the moment, since Singapore Airlines doesn’t have many destinations to fly A350-900ULRs to.

Singapore still isn’t fully open to visitors

Bottom line

For the first time, Singapore Airlines will be operating three daily flights to New York as of late March 2022. The airline will fly nonstop daily from Singapore to both Newark and New York JFK with A350-900ULRs, in addition to the fifth freedom service from Singapore to New York JFK via Frankfurt with an A380.

You wouldn’t think that this would be the time to offer the most capacity in a market so heavily dependent on business travel, but I guess the math is checking out.

What do you make of Singapore Airlines’ New York expansion?

Conversations (28)
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  1. Ian Guest

    I personally believe the addition of the second daily service is to facilitate transit passenger to/from Asia. While Singapore kind of tightened its border, it's still one of the freest transit options (the other maybe ICN while Tokyo is not convenient for all because flights are dispersed in two different airports) for anyone traveling into/out of Asia, as even Hong Kong suspended almost all international flights...

  2. RTBones Member

    I've got to think that this is a response to what is happening in Hong Kong - positioning Singapore to pick up Hong Kong's loss in both business and connectivity. A gamble to be sure in todays climate, but also shrewd business planning.

    1. Brianair Guest

      Lots of people talking about how the Hong Kong situation is helping SQ and Singapore grow, and I agree. But there's an even more important airline to consider: Starlux (the new Taiwanese full-service airline). I gotta say, they launched at the right time because they will surely grow at the expense of CX and HK in the coming years, especially now that they're starting to do long-haul. Perhaps even turning into the best long-term "replacement",...

      Lots of people talking about how the Hong Kong situation is helping SQ and Singapore grow, and I agree. But there's an even more important airline to consider: Starlux (the new Taiwanese full-service airline). I gotta say, they launched at the right time because they will surely grow at the expense of CX and HK in the coming years, especially now that they're starting to do long-haul. Perhaps even turning into the best long-term "replacement", given that their TPE hub is basically next door, and significantly closer than SIN. They might even be able to join Oneworld (assuming CZ doesn't), I know, it's so sad and hard to believe. It's interesting how recently in Asia, at least in terms of potential for their respective aviation markets to grow (influenced by factors like economy/business environment, travel propensity of locals, and inbound tourism), it feels like ​there has been this general shift in which places like Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea are "hot" and on the rise, while places like Hong Kong and Japan are declining. Meanwhile, the mighty PRC is just being the mighty PRC. I wonder how long this will last.

  3. Jim Guest

    I would book the flight from EWR and return to JFK. I prefer overseas flights that arrive in the late afternoon. That way I can clear customs, check into my hotel, grab something to eat and go to bed between 7 and 9pm local time. I find it helps me adjust to the time change quicker than flying a red eye, arriving at sunrise and fight to stay awake all day. I don’t sleep well on planes and not all hotels allow you to check in the morning, so you are stuck in limbo.

  4. Andrew Diamond

    Yeah, this is partially a response given what's happening in Hong Kong. Singapore is establishing itself as the new transit (and in their hopes, financial) hub for that hemisphere.

  5. Brianair Guest

    Singapore as a tourist and business destination sure seems to be on the rise lately, and this surely expands on that. Pre-COVID, I wonder why JFK-SIN wasn’t already being flown nonstop. Now, If only they could add some sort of special onboard lounge/bar space to these A350s (like on VS’s A350s or VA’s old 777s) so passengers can stretch out, which is critical for this flight. Excellent move by SQ!

  6. CF_Frost Member

    This is all about the sunset of Hong Kong as a regional business hub of any importance. Most major corporations are done there and are moving to Singapore.

  7. Joey Diamond

    I don't understand this either but kudos to SQ for putting a lot of faith in NYC! I live here and I'm still working remotely (though technically the building I work in Manhattan is open to employees but only to those who volunteer to work in-person.) I hope this works out for SQ. Personally I always thought it made more sense to focus on EWR given the star alliance network already present there.

  8. RF Guest

    It's good to see additional flights to Singapore. I hope they will add these to the VTL program. I've been wanting to visit again.

  9. Luke Guest

    Hopefully they release decent J award seat availability to star alliance partners for these routes (I know unlikely). Would love to redeem for connecting flights to India for 55k Turkish Miles & Smiles miles in J.

  10. Ken Guest

    Lots and lots of connecting demand from Singapore to rest of Asia/Australia. It's been nearly two years - at this point the restrictions in various countries is irrelevant. If you have go to one of those countries and they allow you in, you're going, quarantine or not.

  11. Michael Hines Guest

    I imagine this about taking market share to SE Asia away from Hong Kong., Guangzhou and Shanghai.

  12. Donato Guest

    Hope everything functions well and timely at JFK. SIA, in my experience, does not handle things well with two major flights departing within 90 minutes.

  13. Trey Guest

    The 10:30a flight from EWR to SIN is pretty much limited to those in NYC area or within 1-hr flight to EWR. The evening flight outta JFK opens up a lot more connectivity even on separate tickets using Delta or JetBlue. SQ currently has the lowest price right now from NYC to SE Asia in premium economy, usually below $1200 RT.

  14. sharon Guest

    this is excellent news.

    The demand must be robust for passengers & cargo to JFK since connections are very limited for Singapore at JFK.

    Connectivity available to east coast & midwest via United at Newark Liberty.

    Star alliance dominating the Singapore market

  15. stogieguy7 Diamond

    Under normal circumstances, I could absolutely see the market for all 3 flights. Unfortunately, with the crazy quilt of ever changing COVID requirements/limits/lockdowns, there is no way that SQ will fill many of these seats. Not only is Singapore an issue to travel to, but most nations you would connect to from there offer challenges to entry as well. The consensus of most people I talk to is that international traveling is generally a PITA...

    Under normal circumstances, I could absolutely see the market for all 3 flights. Unfortunately, with the crazy quilt of ever changing COVID requirements/limits/lockdowns, there is no way that SQ will fill many of these seats. Not only is Singapore an issue to travel to, but most nations you would connect to from there offer challenges to entry as well. The consensus of most people I talk to is that international traveling is generally a PITA right now and Asia is simply to be avoided for the duration. Sure, you COULD theoretically travel to Singapore or other nations in the region. But it wouldn't be worth doing unless you absolutely have to.

    1. Mike C Gold

      Reading this my immediate reaction was, 'What??' but realised that was borne of different perspectives. My reaction was that it was great to have three SQ options for travel to New York. I see your point about options for onward travel from Singapore, but this is something for destination New York as much as it is destination Singapore.

  16. emag Guest

    Both the nonstops have been on the schedule for a while (I'm flying back from MLE at the end of March so have been keeping an eye on them). I just assumed that one of them would be nixed as the time got closer. Is it confirmed that they'll both be sticking around?

  17. HkCaGu Guest

    Ben, NYC-SIN may not be all darkness even with the red-eye-ish timing. It's probably going east (rapid sunrise/sunset cycle) and also after March, everything polar will have long daylight.

    1. Geo Guest

      I'd be curious as to what is the flight path.

  18. Omar Guest

    This is probably directly related to the CX/Hong Kong announcement restricting transit pax and not cargo. The ULRs can't fit that much cargo due to needing to carry extra fuel. Even without VTL, people can still transit Singapore.

  19. Nate nate Guest

    When you say a plane "includes X seats", are there other seats in addition? A Toyota Camry includes two front seats, and has two front seats and two back seats.

  20. Adrian Guest

    Do you know if the new Newark flights will be VTL or not?

    There is just lots of demands for expats in Singapore to go home again especially during the summer!

    It is just a smart use of the aircraft. The JFK flights are subsidized by SQ's current contract with a pharmaceutical company, and maybe EWR flights will also have similar contract. Now Singapore and New York are connected with two daily nonstop flights...

    Do you know if the new Newark flights will be VTL or not?

    There is just lots of demands for expats in Singapore to go home again especially during the summer!

    It is just a smart use of the aircraft. The JFK flights are subsidized by SQ's current contract with a pharmaceutical company, and maybe EWR flights will also have similar contract. Now Singapore and New York are connected with two daily nonstop flights - one daytime and one late night.

    Hopefully I can fly the nonstop JFK flight (a tad longer than EWR flights) this year.

    1. Justin Guest

      My partner is booked on the Newark to Singapore flight in May and I really hope its VTL because she won't be able to go if she has to do a protracted quarantine in Singapore. We booked it last year assuming/hoping that the restrictions would be significantly eased by then. She is an ex-pat who hasn't been home to Singapore in 2 years and is very anxious to be able to go. She almost got...

      My partner is booked on the Newark to Singapore flight in May and I really hope its VTL because she won't be able to go if she has to do a protracted quarantine in Singapore. We booked it last year assuming/hoping that the restrictions would be significantly eased by then. She is an ex-pat who hasn't been home to Singapore in 2 years and is very anxious to be able to go. She almost got to go on the VTL flight from London back in November but was stymied when New York state screwed up her vaccination records so she didn't have the required "Smart Health Card" that Singapore required for the VTL.

    2. RF Guest

      The EWR flight is not VTL.

    3. Justin Guest

      I just went to the SQ website and it isn't showing the VTL flag for any of the New York flights, JFK or EWR. The website doesn't seem to have a clear list of VTL flight numbers and is only telling you to search the schedule.

  21. Anthony Diamond

    1) Singapore may see itself as a better connecting option relative to Hong Kong given all that is going on in Hong Kong right now. Connections to Southeast Asia, Australia, etc.

    2) Haven taken some of these flights in the past, the right move is to fly from EWR and arrive at JFK. The key with the morning departure from EWR, however, is to essentially not sleep the night before and to sleep immediately...

    1) Singapore may see itself as a better connecting option relative to Hong Kong given all that is going on in Hong Kong right now. Connections to Southeast Asia, Australia, etc.

    2) Haven taken some of these flights in the past, the right move is to fly from EWR and arrive at JFK. The key with the morning departure from EWR, however, is to essentially not sleep the night before and to sleep immediately once you get on after the first meal service (which is how the flight service would be set up anyway). Get as much sleep as you can, wake up, get another meal, maybe go back to sleep later, wake up again, meal, land. You more or less do the same thing on the return.

  22. shoeguy Guest

    I think this one of many examples of where airlines are doing what they have to do in order to try and make money in a very challenging environment. The demand for business travel is muted and likely to remain so, but it is possible there is another angle to SQ adding a second NYC area nonstop and that has to do with shifts in business, notably in financial services, perhaps, away from HKG and...

    I think this one of many examples of where airlines are doing what they have to do in order to try and make money in a very challenging environment. The demand for business travel is muted and likely to remain so, but it is possible there is another angle to SQ adding a second NYC area nonstop and that has to do with shifts in business, notably in financial services, perhaps, away from HKG and further into SIN and that's potentially why SQ seems some additional demand. Cargo is likely to be another factor. The hedge funds, private equity, and venture capital sectors potentially more so than the traditional banks and brokerages. I think having a second option on an ULH service is a positive. Some prefer the late night departure as it, in theory allows you to get to sleep right away. Don't think anyone really cares whether it is daylight or darkness outside the entire journey, as most people don't look out the window for 18+ hours straight. Too early to tell if this second nonstop is a sign of anything specific to business travel demand or just a way to deploy a plane where it has a chance to earn money.

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Nate nate Guest

When you say a plane "includes X seats", are there other seats in addition? A Toyota Camry includes two front seats, and has two front seats and two back seats.

2
CF_Frost Member

This is all about the sunset of Hong Kong as a regional business hub of any importance. Most major corporations are done there and are moving to Singapore.

1
Anthony Diamond

1) Singapore may see itself as a better connecting option relative to Hong Kong given all that is going on in Hong Kong right now. Connections to Southeast Asia, Australia, etc. 2) Haven taken some of these flights in the past, the right move is to fly from EWR and arrive at JFK. The key with the morning departure from EWR, however, is to essentially not sleep the night before and to sleep immediately once you get on after the first meal service (which is how the flight service would be set up anyway). Get as much sleep as you can, wake up, get another meal, maybe go back to sleep later, wake up again, meal, land. You more or less do the same thing on the return.

1
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