Finally: CDC Says Fully Vaccinated People Can Travel

Filed Under: Travel

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has today updated its guidance regarding travel for vaccinated people, and it’s good news.

CDC’s updated guidance for vaccinated travelers

The CDC has today updated its guidance, stating that it’s safe for fully vaccinated people to travel:

  • You’re considered fully vaccinated two weeks after receiving the last recommended dose of an approved vaccine (for Johnson & Johnson there’s one dose, while for other vaccines there are two doses)
  • Vaccinated people can travel “at low risk to themselves” both domestically and internationally
  • Vaccinated people shouldn’t have to get tested for coronavirus before travel unless required by the destination, and shouldn’t have to quarantine upon return to the United States, unless required by the local jurisdiction; then again, that wasn’t a requirement before either
  • Vaccinated people should continue to take precautions, like wearing masks in public, avoiding crowded places, maintaining social distance, washing hands frequently, etc.
  • Vaccinated people traveling internationally will continue to have to get a coronavirus test within three days of returning to the US
  • As before, unvaccinated people are discouraged from traveling

As Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the Director of the CDC, describes this update:

“With millions of Americans getting vaccinated every day, it is important to update the public on the latest science about what fully vaccinated people can do safely, now including guidance on safe travel. We continue to encourage every American to get vaccinated as soon as it’s their turn, so we can begin to safely take steps back to our everyday lives. Vaccines can help us return to the things we love about life, so we encourage every American to get vaccinated as soon as they have the opportunity.”

Vaccinated people are encouraged to start traveling

My take on the CDC’s updated guidance

It’s fantastic to see the CDC finally publicly stating that it’s safe for vaccinated people to travel.

Personally it seems to me like an update like this should have come earlier. Of course I recognize the CDC is in an unenviable position, dealing with a fairly new pandemic that we’re learning more about by the day, and trying to prioritize widespread vaccination while keeping people at home.

As I view this:

  • Stating that vaccinated people can travel will be a huge incentive for people to get vaccinated, and that’s something we need, especially for the people who are on the fence
  • Virtually all of the science we’ve seen so far suggests that vaccines largely provide two-way protection — if you’re vaccinated you’re unlikely to develop a severe case of coronavirus, and you’re also unlikely to have an asymptomatic case, making it much less likely that you’d unknowingly spread coronavirus to others
  • At some point I can see how it creates distrust among some portion of the public when science and recommendations don’t align
  • Science aside, I can’t help but feel like the CDC’s messaging is atrocious — the CDC states that it’s safe for vaccinated people to travel and that they can travel, but also says that they shouldn’t travel

Regardless, I’m thrilled to see the CDC update its recommendations, even if it comes with some mixed messaging. With a promise of all American adults having access to a vaccine by May, we’ll continue to see the travel sector grow. The end of traveling shaming is just around the corner…

US airports are going to be busy this summer

Bottom line

The CDC has finally updated its guidance, making it clear that it’s now safe for fully vaccinated people to travel. The science already pointed to that being the case, but it’s nice to have this be the official recommendation, as it will hopefully contribute to more people choosing to get vaccinated.

What do you make of the CDC’s updated guidance?

Comments
  1. About time. The vaccines work. It’s time to acknowledge that people with them can interact safely with others at low risk to themselves. We were too slow to lock down and too quick to reopen, but we’re absolutely killing it on the vaccine rollout and should treat them like the miracle they are.

  2. and what pain and misery awaits those people who cannot or will not, for whatever reason, get vaccinated?

    again – just like the travel restrictions – everyone thing is rainbows and unicorns until, for whatever reason, you test positive….

  3. Ben,

    You completely nailed it. Politics held back the science on this one. I’ve said forever, folks need a carrot to get vaccinated; this is one of them.

    Since vaccine appears to do a good job on asymptomatic spread, they really should consider you can ditch the mask with vaccine. Could be another great carrot, but acknowledge non-vaccinated could abuse.

  4. Rochelle Walensky is an embarrassing science denier who fits right with the long line of embarrassing figures at CDC. Vaccines work, BUT you should keep wearing a mask and get tested 3 days after you arrive at home? Complete double talk, completely devoid of evidence or reason. Government science isn’t real science, but politics dressed up as science. The vaccinated are immune from Covid such that the risk of serious illness and death all but disappear to the point that they are subsumed by the normal risks of life.

    The message should be just that: get vaccinated, and forget about Covid the same way you forget about Polio, Rubella, Mumps, and other previously horrible diseases that no longer threaten the vaccinated. Vaccination ends the crisis, but the government can’t just let it end.

  5. Great news! My only question/concern is with the J&J shot. I keep reading that a 2nd/booster shot will likely be introduced for that one, so I’m wondering how that would affect people who received it.

  6. If you’re looking for a list of countries open to vaccinated travelers, Afar keeps an updated list and it has links to the relevant country and embassy sites. Seems to be pretty accurate and there are more on there than one would immediately assume.

  7. @Ben, What sense does that make – you are protected only within the borders of the U.S.? Totally ridiculous.

  8. I think that there was some delay in making this statement since many people were not eligible to get the vaccine. I was fortunate to get the vaccine in Dec/Jan, but if the CDC had said I could travel freely, and my neighbor couldn’t because my state didn’t put him at the front of the line, that creates an awkward situation. Given that most people will be eligible for the vaccine in the next few weeks, I think politically it was the right time to release the statement.

    These are guideline changes, so in reality, they don’t change much for me. Personally, I looked at the data after getting vaccinated, and made my own choice to travel. What I am really waiting for is the waiver of a negative test to re-enter the country. I know being vaccinated I have a very, very low chance of getting sick, but I may miss a couple weeks of work if I test positive in Mexico, Iceland, etc.

  9. @Ben, how does it make sense to still require a test (for those vaccinated) to come back into the country? Vaccinated individuals don’t carry the virus (according to the CDC). Am I missing something here?

  10. It’s ridiculous and hypocritical that the CDC hasn’t dropped the testing requirement for returning vaccinated international travelers. Additionally, the Federal Government’s refusal to issue vaccine passports for international travel, leaving it up to the private sector, is another potential obstacle. The CDC continues to make it as difficult as possible to travel internationally.

  11. The requirement for COVID testing upon return from foreign travel could be due to a concern about acquiring a foreign variant that may or not be vaccine resistant.

  12. “and what pain and misery awaits those people who cannot or will not, for whatever reason, get vaccinated?”

    @MF, I would say getting sick from Covid would be the biggest risk of pain and misery that awaits for people who won’t get vaccinated.

    We are at the point where the highest risk groups have been able to get vaccinated for a couple of months now.

    My state is now allowing anyone over 16 to get vaccinated and there are open slots for appointments. At this point, as long as everyone who wants to get vaccinated can get vaccinated, I see no reason to continue a lot of restrictions to protect the ones that don’t get vaccinated.

  13. Good. And all the knuckle-dragging, anti-vaxx, Q-publican, COVID denialist idiots can take the bus. I’m so looking forward to the airports and flight experiences once the right-wing loons have been screened out.

    A smart, responsible, science-based, reasonable, and actually competent federal government. How refreshing. Biden is hitting it out of the park over and over. I wasn’t expecting him to get so much right so quickly, but I have to admit I’m impressed. Keep it going, Joe. Fixing up our nation’s airports would be a good follow-up that we would all appreciate — don’t forget that during Infrastructure Week.

  14. I fly back into US for next Friday. Just spending one night in Mexico. Can I use a negative test from my regular testing taken next Wednesday?

    Ie do you have to take the test while you are abroad?

  15. Where is all this science that clearly shows that those vaccinated cannot still spread the virus? Symptomatically or asymptomatically? Is there a peer reviewed literature that demonstrates our confidence in this? People are confusing prevention of (severe) symptoms with prevention of catching the virus. And then there are the variants!

    There is only one certainty and that’s the fact that we still don’t know everything about Covid and the impact of vaccines with 100% certainty. Don’t get me wrong, as a vaccinated individual such announcements make me very happy. And I agree that vaccines are our way out of the pandemic. But I can’t help but feel that there is a blind faith (maybe conveniently) in the effectiveness of vaccines where the science itself is still learning.

    And of course, this will only be over when it’s over for everyone worldwide! Until then, many countries will maintain certain forms of border control and requirements.

  16. @Nick
    No, you do not have to get tested in the country you are leaving. So you can test in US, go to Mexico for 1-3 days, and come back with that negative test.

  17. @NK3 thanks! just in case customs tries to challenge me on that, do you have a link from a .gov website I can reference?

  18. Any news on when travel restrictions on travel from Europe will be restricted? Would make sense to allow fully vaccinated people come from the EU to the US on the same basis…

  19. My partner and I are spending five days in Tamarindo, Costa Rica at the end of April. We’re both fully vaccinated. Arranging for a COVID test in Costa Rica is arduous, though many hotels and even the Liberia International Airport can set that up…for a substantial fee. We’ll be paying $150/person for a COVID test at a medical clinic in Tamarindo 72 hours before our return flight to the US.
    While the new guidelines are a step in the right direction, this requirement even for vaccinated individuals doesn’t make sense. COVID variants are a concern, but, realistically, they’re already in the US.

  20. @Nick The airlines are in charge of monitoring this, so customs should not matter. I can’t find that specific scenario answered on the CDC’s page, but Delta does have it on their “U.S. COVID-19 Testing Entry Requirements for International Travel” page.

  21. “and what pain and misery awaits those people who cannot or will not, for whatever reason, get vaccinated?”

    @MF – If you refuse to get vaccinated, stay home in Texas.

  22. 1. Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to get a SARS-CoV-2 viral test before or after domestic travel, unless testing is required by local, state, or territorial health authorities.
    International travel
    2. Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to get tested before leaving the United States unless required by their destination.
    3. Fully vaccinated air travelers coming to the United States from abroad, including U.S. citizens, are still required to have a negative SARS-CoV-2 viral test result or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before they board a flight to the United States.
    4. International travelers arriving in the United States are still recommended to get a SARS-CoV-2 viral test 3-5 days after travel regardless of vaccination status.
    For example, if one wants to visit Alaska, a pre-test is a must unless “local authorities” change the requirement. (see #1 above).
    Similarly, International travel to country such as India, pre-travel testing is necessary (see # 2 above).
    Work place may require us to quarantine for at least 3-5 days after international travel (because of #4).
    So, I am not yet excited about the new CDC guideline.

  23. Still nothing explained about what the guidelines are for families with kids who obviously haven’t and cant be vaccinated but parents are. I’d like to believe that it is okay to do given the very low rates kids are impacted.

  24. There will still be travel shaming until other countries catch up. Trust me, Americans won’t be welcomed with open arms in Europe or in Canada until there’s a similar level of confidence & vaccination. I myself am waiting still to have the chance to be vaccinated, and even when I will be it’ll likely be with the AZ vaccine, which will be 12 weeks(+) of waiting for the second dose. This puts me into (very) late summer or autumn for full vaccination, in best case scenario. (June for first dose, 12 weeks until second, 2 weeks until accepted). This is inherently unfair and puts a vaccine bias towards Pfizer/Moderna (which is already very skewed and unfair) or J&J – none of which are necessarily more effective after one shot than AZ.

  25. All Americans will not have “access” to a vaccine by May — the government has just said there will be enough inventory. Administration of vaccine is another issue entirely. Some jurisdictions, like here in DC, simply have not received enough doses yet and there is a huge backlog/waiting list that will not magically clear up in May but will rather take weeks to work people through the system.

  26. When did the test within three days of arrival into the US come into being? I flew from the UK to ORD in November and there was, then, no such requirement. I don’t recollect the rule changing since then.

  27. @Mark well said. This hand wringing about vaccines MAYBE not being effective and continuing to wear masks AFTER you are vaccinated is absolute lunacy. The CDC has ZERO credibility. And I pity anyone who was actually waiting for them to say it’s ok to see people, it’s ok to travel, etc. I’ve been traveling regularly since may. I’m fully vaccinated. I’m currently in Mexico where no one wears a mask. And it’s pure bliss. Should I feel bad?

  28. How magnanimous of them. This is almost as generous as Biden allowing us to have a small bbq at our houses on the 4th.

  29. There is still a risk of catching Covid despite the vaccine however the risk is lower. Wearing masks and taking precautions will be a prerequisite for a long time. In the U.K. the rate of those affected has dropped drastically, unlike in the continent and over 50% of the population received the first dose. The problem is counties with increasing rates and a far lower percentage vaccinated. Therefore overseas travel will be extremely limited. It may be easier to visit the US shortly than France, sadly.

    We need to be very cautious and not rush into things and end up back where we were 6 months ago.

  30. @Airfarer The above post has a link to the story about the test requirement. It began on 1/26/21.

  31. Thanks CDC! They also confirmed the sun rises in the east, Jupiter is a planet, and ice cream is delicious. What would I do without them!!!

  32. The CDC really deserves to have its budget decimated and a complete overhaul in structure. It’s incredible how poorly run it is and susceptible to political whims. At least cut the communications department down to one or two people total, and put in place a gag order on everyone else. Good grief.

  33. I mean this has no practical implications, or am I missing something here?
    Does anyone care about what the CDC writes in its guidelines?

  34. The CDC went from having to defend an anti-science administration, leading to many unnecessary deaths…to now being overly cautious in spite of emerging data.

    And yet with all this, it’s interesting to see all the epidemiologists posting here today decrying the CDC. I guess you know we’re getting back to normal when everyone thinks they can do a better job than the government.

  35. I realise this is a US-centric site but in the U.K. we have been prioritising vaccinations by age and then by risk. Frankly I feel very strongly that those who have had a vaccine can wait until it’s been offered to everyone before we start allowing those who have had it to travel. As someone in their 30s, I locked down and followed the rules to help out those who were vulnerable- the least they can do is postpone their holiday until I’ve been vaccinated.

  36. I agree with new guidance on international travel with one exception. Why must vaccinated people traveling internationally continue to receive a coronavirus test within three days of returning to the US? Doesn’t make sense. If you’re vaccinated, you’re protected per the CDC! Isn’t this the objective of inoculations? I don’t plan any international travel until most nations open with necessary safeguards; namely, being vaccinated and without further testing. Lastly, I support a digital vaccine record to record COVID inoculations to accelerate international travel.

  37. “ Why must vaccinated people traveling internationally continue to receive a coronavirus test within three days of returning to the US?”

    Because of mutations and variants. If you go abroad and bring back something vaccine resistant*, I think we’d all appreciate knowing about that.

    *I’m not aware of any strain that is vaccine resistant, but given other diseases develop resistance to vaccines and treatments it seems fair to assume that a strain resistant to the current vaccines would emerge eventually.

  38. Until the testing requirement is dropped for those that are vaccinated, this is pointless.

    What puts us off traveling right now is NOT the fear of getting the virus, but the fear of getting a false positive test that will leave us stranded on the return trip. Where do you self-quarantine when you are away from home? Hotels probably don’t want your business if you are positive.

  39. @Luke California in general, and Bay Area in particular, is FUBAR. For a supposedly hub of technology and innovation, I have no idea how the general populace here in the Bay Area is so dumb and naive politically. Even the local media is brain dead.

    Believe me, I know. I still live there, though planning to move away as soon as we figure out where to go. I hope it’s not too late.

  40. Clarity of thought is necessary. While the vaccine may do a decent job of reducing the probability of you experiencing Covid-19 symptoms within the limits of efficacy, vaccines do not prevent you from picking up and spreading the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Indeed the virus can still reproduce to a lesser degree in your body. And of course vaccines do absolutely nothing for your collection and transmission of fomites. So a great deal of poppy cock is talked about “vaccines work”. The key is the correct and limited interpretation or “work”. The “vaccinated can travel” issue is just the government dangling a carrot to encourage you to get your vaccine. It is relatively meaningless. Then there is the issue of widespread vaccination altering the evolutionary pressure on the virus, resulting in more pathogenic strains evolving – strains that would rapidly die out (together with their hosts) in an unvaccinated population, but which flourish in a hardier vaccinated population. They just want you to get your dose of pathogenic priming so that the variant they’re cooking up for next winter will achieve their population reduction targets. In particular, avoid the Astra Zeneca vaccine.

  41. The CDC gives guidance. That’s not a regulation. Unless travel regulation laws change, things are still the same for international travel.

  42. @Luke & Milo: Looks like we found our SWA Pilots from that ATC hot mic lol

    I get my 2nd jab of Moderna on 4/20. Gonna go to Albania in May, time to get back out there.

  43. I think your article is misleading. CDC announcement just says there is low risk to yourself traveling, which has been the whole point with the vaccine. It is still not recommending non essential travel.

    If people are desperate to travel, why do they need CDC to given them a nod ? Travel has always been with risk, if you are okay with the risk and okay with a remote chance of transmission to others, go ahead and travel. Just don’t expect mask, social distancing and testing to go. It’s here to stay. And even if it goes away due to political pressure or backlash from public, nothing changes the way virus or future pandemics spread.

    Experts still don’t agree on whether vaccinated people can transmit the virus or not. Still more evidence is needed. And we also don’t have good data how long protection from vaccine lasts. That data is also very new. And with only 16 percent of country vaccinated, this is for sure not the right time for any non essential travel

    But again, we were never forced to a true lockdown like other countries and a leader in Covid cases and deaths !

  44. If they’re dropping this requirement, I’d expect them to drop the requirement for vaccinated travelers to get tested before coming to the US at some point within the next few months. It makes no sense to require a test if someone’s vaccinated.

  45. Why has the CDC ordered pre-return testing even for vaccinated international travelers? TL;DR: For the known variants, a vaccinated person may be a carrier; and the current vaccines may not protect against potential new variants (i.e., this viral family has surprised us before and it may surprise us again).

    Yes, the CDC’s short-form messaging is poor — if an authority doesn’t explain *why* a regulation is necessary, people will project their own preconceptions into the vacuum (as seen in these comments). There *is* a rationale, but it’s in the full text of the CDC order (26 January 2021) as published in the Federal Register (see below), and these days, how many rushed journalists bother reading that deeply? (“Let’s cram a nuanced topic into 280 characters, because Twitter has become central to public outreach” doesn’t help.)

    “[…] routine pre-departure testing of all U.S.-bound aircraft passengers is needed not only to reduce introduction of the two known SARS-CoV-2 variants from UK and [South Africa], but also future variants that might be more transmissible and cause more severe illness.”

    The updated Order on 2 March doesn’t provide an additional “why.”

    (https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2021/01/28/2021-01977/requirement-for-negative-pre-departure-covid-19-test-result-or-documentation-of-recovery-from, https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/testing-international-air-travelers.html)

  46. @DB,
    “A smart, responsible, science-based, reasonable, and actually competent federal government…” <— OMG, Best April fools joke EVER! Dude, you win the internets…

  47. Semi-serious question. Were Americans ever not allowed to travel? Answer: nope. I do appreciate many people do pay close attention to CDC and this change may cause many to feel more comfortable traveling. For those that cannot or will not get vaccinated, this does not appear to change anything. Delta will still take their money and they can now sit next to you in an unblocked middle seat. Hard to see how this is a win for the vaccinated. Federal gov has punted on vaccine passports. Seems like more symbolism by a generally ineffective public health agency.

  48. @Dick Bupkiss
    “A smart, responsible, science-based, reasonable, and actually competent federal government. How refreshing. Biden is hitting it out of the park over and over.”

    The article points out the mixed messaging and questionable science…..

    Ben “I can’t help but feel like the CDC’s messaging is atrocious — the CDC states that it’s safe for vaccinated people to travel and that they can travel, but also says that they shouldn’t travel”

    Confused CDC and more confused Joe Biden means home run to sycophant.

    Absolutely Brilliant!

  49. CDC lost a lot (if not all) credibility with a lot of people…beginning with – masks are not necessary, then – masks are absolutely necessary, travel, no travel, protected, not protected…a few days ago it was “doom is coming”, now – you can travel…please…they are just fumbling and bubbling…give people something practically useful – like exemption from Covid test for vaccinated people upon return from international travel…otherwise, it’s just blah-blah-blah that will change tomorrow to another tune…while using a shield like phrase du jour “science tells us” (which lost it’s meaning by being so overused)…

  50. Good start. Now the CDC needs to state that children too young to be vaccinated are also free to travel without taking a COVID test. While I expect states like Hawaii will drop its COVID testing requirement in the next few months for vaccinated people, the CDC needs to lean on Hawaii to drop the requirement for children who are too young to be vaccinated. The evidence at this point is pretty clear that children are not good vectors for this disease and pose very little risk to the population as a whole.

  51. First. I’m amazed that no one has discussed how you prove you were vaccinated. The new cdc card is a perfect symbol of how disconnected cdc is from life in 2021. Hand written. Not digitalized. Easily forged. Wallet unfriendly. Second. For people who had covid how do they prove it to airline date personnel? Third. I had covid 12 months ago when they had just discovered mild cases. I make sure I get an antibodies test at labcorp (costs a whopping $10 and gives results from a blood test in one day) so I know I still have antibodies. Would airlines accept that? These 3 issues have not been addressed in these messages or in the media coverage. If they have would love to have links.

  52. “Regardless, I’m thrilled to see the CDC update its recommendations, ” It should be clear that the CDC is NOT recommending travel. Saying someone who is fully vaccinated is at low risk if they travel is not recommending that they travel. The CDC also said “CDC is not recommending travel at this time due to the rising number of cases.” So the current CDC recommendation is that people NOT travel. They are really only saying this to encourage the people who already ignore their recommendations and travel anyway to get vaccinated.

  53. “The evidence at this point is pretty clear that children are not good vectors for this disease and pose very little risk to the population as a whole.” – That was true for the original covid strain. However, with the new variants children are major causes of the spread of covid so don’t expect children to be given a free pass in the future. The vaccine trials as to children seem to be going well though.

  54. @Andrew in NY we have a digital app that provides you with a QR code to show you have been vaccinated. It verifies your vaccination with the department of health. Then all they have to do is scan the QR code and check your id to see if your name matches. Hopefully it will be expanded to other states and then become viable on an international level.

  55. Anyone *can* travel, no matter if you’ve received the vaccine or not. There isn’t and won’t be any regulation that prohibits non-vaccinated people to travel domestically. And for what it’s worth, that little piece of paper can be forged in less than 20 minutes. My 14 year old probably makes it in 10 minutes.

  56. Good start, but a long way to go. The vaccine passport is going to be a requirement as long as there is inequity for distribution.

    As others have commented, the whole “free market vaccine passport” is a major failing of all governments. I completely understand that it’s complicated (because not all vaccines are recognized by all governments), but that’s even more reason to coordinate on a system to indicate what type, when it was administered in a secure manner.

  57. It blows my mind reading some of these comments as someone who does not live in America. It’s as if many people in this forum completely have their blinders on, and have not been reading the same reports that the rest of us have.

    In Australia, our vaccine rollout is well behind that of the US. Now this is due to a variety of factors, including our incompetent federal government, but also a lack of urgency due to our low to non-existent case numbers thanks to the sensible action of our state premiers despite the complete lack of leadership from the federal government.

    Just because you are vaccinated – it does not mean you are instantly a god and protected from all disease or spreading it to others!

    Numerous studies have shown that you can still pass the virus onto others – and that is why countries such as Australia have repeatedly said, no matter what your own Government says, we personally do not want you until we have a majority of our population vaccinated (which is many months away – my 80+ year old grandparents haven’t even been informed when they can expect to receive it yet – and this is in an incredibly privileged first-world country like Australia – imagine what it is like in others that are not so fortunate) and safe from the virus.

    If you so urgently feel the need to travel – do it among your fellow citizens domestically – within your bubble. This is exactly what we here in Australia have learnt to do in recent months – due to our international borders being shut for the foreseeable future – thanks to the utter clusterfuck that was the handling of the pandemic in other countries including the United States and Western Europe. There seems to be constant complaints about the actions of China towards your local industries – so why not do your part and support your local businesses and tourism industry? There is a reason why America received so many tourists prior to the pandemic, why not go and find out for yourself?

    At the end of the day, no hate to any of you, but I’m sure you can imagine how frustrating it can be to watch all of this go down from the outside looking in. -Max

  58. It blows my mind reading some of these comments as someone who does not live in America. It’s as if many people in this forum completely have their blinders on, and have not been reading the same reports that the rest of us have.

    In Australia, our vaccine rollout is well behind that of the US. Now this is due to a variety of factors, including our incompetent federal government, but also a lack of urgency due to our low to non-existent case numbers thanks to the sensible action of our state premiers despite the complete lack of leadership from the federal government.

    Just because you are vaccinated – it does not mean you are instantly a god and protected from all disease or spreading it to others!

    Numerous studies have shown that you can still pass the virus onto others – and that is why countries such as Australia have repeatedly said, no matter what your own Government says, we personally do not want you until we have a majority of our population vaccinated (which is many months away – my 80+ year old grandparents haven’t even been informed when they can expect to receive it yet – and this is in an incredibly privileged first-world country like Australia – imagine what it is like in others that are not so fortunate) and safe from the virus.

    If you so urgently feel the need to travel – do it among your fellow citizens domestically – within your bubble. This is exactly what we here in Australia have learnt to do in recent months – due to our international borders being shut for the foreseeable future – thanks to the utter clusterf*ck that was the handling of the pandemic in other countries including the United States and Western Europe. There seems to be constant complaints about the actions of China towards your local industries – so why not do your part and support your local businesses and tourism industry? There is a reason why America received so many tourists prior to the pandemic, why not go and find out for yourself?

    At the end of the day, no hate to any of you, but I’m sure you can imagine how frustrating it can be to watch all of this go down from the outside looking in. -Max

  59. @Max – “If you so urgently feel the need to travel – do it among your fellow citizens domestically – within your bubble.”

    That’s what we’ve been doing for the past year. Domestic and international travel are not mutually exclusive.

    “but I’m sure you can imagine how frustrating it can be to watch all of this go down from the outside looking in.”

    If you’re not happy with the Australian vaccine rollout, that’s not our problem. Take it up with Canberra. Why should we alter our behavior because of the inability of the Australian government to get you guys vaccinated? If us diseased Americans aren’t being allowed into Australia, why do you care what we do?

  60. @Brian L. I’m not happy with the Australian vaccine rollout – I’ve never said anything to the contrary. I have nothing against America – my mom’s side of the family is American in fact. I am just sick if reading here and elsewhere what appears to me as Americans having the natural instinct of wanting to travel internationally – trust me so do I, as I’m sure all of us on this forum want to – but then taking this as they should be able to travel wherever they want just because their own government/CDC says it is safe for them to do so, no matter what the local government recommendations/guidelines are, or what the local citizens feel. My apologies if it sounded a bit harsh, in retrospect it probably was, but I’ve just become fed up with it. -Max

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