Hawaii Delays Tourism Reopening To September 1

Filed Under: Travel

It was hinted at a couple of days ago that this would happen, and it’s now official. Hawaii won’t welcome tourists without a 14-day quarantine until at least September 1, 2020.

Hawaii’s current 14-day quarantine

In late March Hawaii introduced a 14-day quarantine for anyone coming to the state. This has been extended a few times, and until this week it was valid through July 31, 2020.

There has been no option to get tested to avoid the 14-day quarantine, meaning that Hawaii has been off limits to a vast majority of visitors, since you’d need to quarantine for two weeks before you can even start your vacation. Furthermore, unlike other states, Hawaii has been strictly enforcing the quarantine requirement.

In late June, Hawaii’s governor announced plans to restart tourism as of August 1, 2020. The plan was for travelers to be able to skip the 14-day quarantine by producing a negative coronavirus test result that was taken less than 72 hours before travel.

This was supposed to apply to both residents and visitors, and there would be no option to get tested on arrival to avoid the quarantine.

Hawaii has required a 14-day quarantine for travelers

Hawaii postpones tourism by a month

Hawaii Governor David Ige has announced that Hawaii will eliminate the 14-day quarantine requirement as of September 1, 2020, at the earliest. This decision is being made due to the increased number of coronavirus cases we’re seeing in several US states.

As Governor Ige explains:

“This was not an easy decision to make. It really was a choice between two difficult options.

We did believe it would be in the best interests of everyone here in Hawaii to delay the start of the program. I also want to make it clear that we still believe in the pre-travel testing program. We will continue to take actions necessary to implement it safely.”

Research suggests that pre-travel coronavirus testing would prevent 80-90% of potential cases from visitors. Initially it was believed that this would lead to an average of about five infected passengers per day, while with the uptick we’ve seen in cases, it’s now believed that Hawaii could get 15-20 new cases per day.

Hawaii has seen an average of over two dozen cases per day in the past week, and it’s feared that number could continue to grow even without visitors being allowed in.

Hawaii plans to delay its pre-travel testing scheme

Bottom line

Hawaii won’t welcome visitors without a 14-day quarantine until September 1, 2020, at the earliest. Until this week the plan was for tourists to be welcome with pre-travel testing as of August 1, but that has now been delayed due to the increasing number of coronavirus cases in many US states.

This is yet another reminder of how it’s impossible to plan any travel in advance right now, whether domestic or international. With entry and quarantine requirements constantly changing, there’s really no point in planning.

What do you make of Hawaii delaying its reopening until September at the earliest?

Comments
  1. It is very admirable the way Hawaiian government has kept, and continue keeping, their residents safe. Bravo.

    Isn’t it why we pay taxes?

  2. The one major hurdle for any of these states or countries that require negative Covid test, is getting the test done on a person under the age of 12, in Pennsylvania at least. The moment I heard Hawaii was reopening, I starting looking at hotels, flights everything – BUT my doctor wouldn’t give my 9 year the test, nor was Rite Aid or CVS , so planning the trip stopped

  3. We cancelled our late September two-week stay a few days ago. With the increase in mainland cases, I could see this delay coming. Hopefully the Hawaiian tourist economy will open. We have friends in Hawaii who are hurting.

  4. Hawaii is going to be in an economic depression. The state’s economy was already really bad, not least because of the incredibly high cost of living on Oahu (Honolulu) and the fact that the economy is so heavily dependent upon tourism.

    Another wrinkle in the equation is the fact that Hawaiian tourism—at least Oahu—is dependent on Japan. Will the Japanese come back? Who knows. This was already a problem because long-term Japan’s economy has been bad and its demographics are aging.

    Four plus months of no tourism is devastating. I would not be surprised if a handful of hotels in Waikiki go out of business.

    On the plus side, real estate prices should drop. That may make Hawaii a little more affordable. Living on Oahu with any quality of life is almost impossible unless you make at least $100,000.

  5. @Jake

    I read Hawaii News Now on a daily basis and talk to my friends and customers out there on a regular basis and they are anything BUT thankful.

    Hawaiian Airlines may not survive and the small businesses based around tourism will likely disappear.

    People are already leaving for the mainland to try and find work.

  6. Hawaii’s testing has been abysmal and their healthcare access has been subpar throughout, such that a few dozen cases for them is concerning.

    With no attempts to improve the above issues, short term it may be popular to just prolong the shut down, but the Hawaiian economy and its people are already suffering unlike any other state and long term effects will be devastating.

  7. The hysteria over an increase in cases is completely misplaced in my view. Infections bring immunity in time.
    Meanwhile travel and hospitality which is 16% of employment worldwide has been devastated while this technocratic social engineering experiment continues to destroy the world. Better to manage the virus and keep the world from imploding.

  8. Good. Contrast the Hawaii approach with Bali: already open to domestic tourists, planning to open for internationals on September 1st, despite every hospital bed on the island being occupied, infection rates soaring, very low rates of testing, a plethora of quack cures ( mostly prayer and old wives stuff). Literally the last place on earth anyone with half a brain would contemplate visiting.

  9. It’s not just that mainland cases are spiking, it’s also that there are some logistical items that weren’t considered. Some places won’t even do a covid test for “travel purposes” because of the shortage of tests. They will only do them if you have a number of symptoms. And there are some areas where the tests that are available take up to 5 days for results, meaning that you can’t take them less than 72 hours before your Hawaii arrival. Even that 72 number is being debated in Hawaii. Many feel it should be less than that.

  10. Sorry to ask a dumb question, but if Hawaii has been closed since March, how are they seeing an average of two dozen cases a day in the past week? If that is true, then how does shutting down the economy anywhere make sense?

  11. In AZ tests can take 7-9 days which makes them pointless for travel. Until the US makes progress and develop enough reliable tests that provide results within 24 hrs testing for travel is impractical. We’ve had 7 months to get our act together but have largely failed.

  12. @Alan I hope you are joking.

    @PA100 There have been several studies/looks at herd immunity for this virus and what it would take and it would kill so many people to get there it is not our best bet, without a vaccine. Once we have a vaccine it will be doable. But in the meantime, wear a mask for other’s safety and hold strong. This is hitting so many states so hard, economically and with deaths, it is hard to imagine how the world will look in a year.

    I noted those same problems when I saw the 72-hour announcement- many states can’t or won’t provide tests that fast, or charge $350+ if you demand it and even then you have to have a reason other than travel. It also didn’t account for the connecting flights where people are coming from different places and might be exposed to the virus along the trip to Hawaii and then spread it in Hawaii, nor did it deal with the three days of intervening time between the negative test being taken and the person’s arrival in Hawaii and any reckless behavior they may engage in or even inadvertent exposure. As I state above- economies are being wrecked by this virus but how do you balance that against lives? And I am not pie in the sky about this- I’ve had my salary reduced dramatically since the start of the virus and expect to take another hit as this surges again.

  13. Complete isolation is the only way to stop an infectious disease from spreading. Humans don’t like being isolated. Economically, travel and tourism drive much of the economy, kill the economy and you create a ton of social problems.

    As far as the airline industry recovering, people need to feel confident that they can book a trip and that the trip will occur as planned. Until fears of cancelation and border closures are ended, most people won’t book flights.

  14. Good for them for doing the right thing. My Hawaii trip can wait (and so can yours, you entitled idiots).

  15. September 1st is my hope. Let’s do it.
    With resurgence of shutdowns and now masks almost required everywhere, we’re in for a drastic downturn IMO.
    Also, if we refer to anti-body tests, it’s feasible that 1/6- 1/3 of the population has now already had it.
    Holding on to my mid Sept booking for dear life. It’s a mistake rate I’ll never come by again.

  16. The hysteria over an increase in cases is completely misplaced in my view. Infections bring immunity in time.
    Meanwhile travel and hospitality which is 16% of employment worldwide has been devastated while this technocratic social engineering experiment continues to destroy the world. Better to manage the virus and keep the world from imploding.
    – BA100

    We were trying to manage the virus by instituting lockdowns back in March/April. New Yorkers did so aggressively, and they’re a major success story. If the rest of the country had done likewise then we’d be emerging from lockdowns cautiously but optimistically nationwide right now, as most other western countries are. Instead, many states half-assed it and ignored the warnings of scientists. Now, they’re reaping the result of a prolonged pandemic, with no end in sight. It’s likely beyond containment for the majority of the country at this point. Thousands will die needlessly.

  17. One of the problem with Hawaii’s original plan to open on August 1st was its planned partnership with CZS: while CVS was going to test, they are only testing residents of their own states. Therefore, Hawaii residents visiting the mainland would be screwed because they wouldn’t be able to be tested out-of-state. Thus, facing mandatory quarantine when to go home.

  18. People are going to get coronavirus. Deal with it.

    The difference is whether people are dying. I’ve seen nothing to suggest that deaths are anywhere near where they were this winter and early spring. The vast majority of people will get it and never get seriously sick.

  19. People are going to get coronavirus. Deal with it.

    The difference is whether people are dying. I’ve seen nothing to suggest that deaths are anywhere near where they were this winter and early spring. The vast majority of people will get it and never get seriously sick.

    – Franz Christian

    I mean, what is your goal here? What is your ideal response? That we just open everything up, and whoever dies, dies? Because that’s not going to happen. States like Hawaii are going to stay closed down as long as they need to in order to minimize deaths (the whole point of this article). The longer you kick and scream about dealing with this pandemic like a responsible adult, the longer it’s going to take for all of us to get through it.

  20. @Luke: Except Hawaii has been closed since March and it hasn’t apparently worked. They’re an island in the middle of Pacific. They aren’t even letting Hawaiians back to Hawaii. If it doesn’t work in Hawaii, how’s it going to work anywhere else? The reality is the U.S. is worse at coronavirus for several reasons. First, we’re a federation. We don’t have a strong central government (the feds) when it comes to domestic authority. The vast majority of coronavirus is state and local. It wouldn’t even be constitutional for the president (regardless of whether it was Trump or not) to order masks. Second, we’re a huge country with significant intra-country travel. You can’t really legally shutdown travel between the states. Third, we are a country in which shopping malls are the norm. We don’t have the kind of outdoor socialization spaces that Europe has. Fourth, the reason why coronavirus is spiking in Florida and Arizona is partly because these are states where a lot of people spend considerable time in air conditioning inside.

  21. And the fun part is: some latest research seems to suggest that most antibodies in those who didn’t get violently sick are going away in a matter of three months.
    So much for the despicable ‘herd’ argument (which not just only calls people cattle, but also factors in millions of deaths).

  22. So many callously entitled Trumptards who think this will blow over, we’ll “get to herd immunity”, and “most people will have zero problems after getting infected with Covid”. And you scumbags wonder why Americans are banned in most of the world right now? Hello irony? Have you idiots ever had one second of self reflection in your oblivious, narcissistic lives? My Lord, there is no hope for 30% of the American population. All of these internet infectious disease experts spreading ignorance is relentlessly exhausting.

  23. @Jake

    NY did a horrible job…HORRIBLE.

    Cuomo forced sick patients into nursing homes and in February and March DiBlasio was encouraging people to go about their business.

    Not to mention the fact that the WSJ cited general unpreparedness at the city and state levels.

    Only a fool thinks that NY handled this correctly.

  24. Why have so many Asian and European nations done well in containing Covid, and some not? In Europe, the differences have been stark between Italy/Spain/U.K./Sweden and Germany/rest of Nordic/Greece for instance. The vast majority of countries shut down around the same time in mid-March. Still we have these differences. Looking forward to finding out why.

  25. @Marv – well put!

    So many callously entitled Trumptards who think this will blow over, we’ll “get to herd immunity”, and “most people will have zero problems after getting infected with Covid”. And you scumbags wonder why Americans are banned in most of the world right now? Hello irony? Have you idiots ever had one second of self reflection in your oblivious, narcissistic lives? My Lord, there is no hope for 30% of the American population.

    Indeed. Contrast the disaster that only worsens each day across Trumpistan with how most EU countries have succeeded. It’s got nothing to do with the virus. It’s got everything to do with 1) an incompetent administration, and 2) morons who think that laws and rules (including science) does not apply to them so they behave irresponsibly. As long as this combination continues, it will only get worse and worse. The knuckle-dragging, Trump-licking idiots are completely responsible.

  26. @Jake

    NY did a horrible job…HORRIBLE.

    Cuomo forced sick patients into nursing homes and in February and March DiBlasio was encouraging people to go about their business.

    Not to mention the fact that the WSJ cited general unpreparedness at the city and state levels.

    Only a fool thinks that NY handled this correctly.

    You can litigate early response decisions if you want to – there are certainly specifics to reflect on in hindsight – but the numbers speak for themselves. On July 10, New York State reported 65 new cases, Arizona reported 4057 new cases, Florida reported 11,433 new cases. My sources are public health numbers.

  27. @Luke: Except Hawaii has been closed since March and it hasn’t apparently worked. They’re an island in the middle of Pacific. They aren’t even letting Hawaiians back to Hawaii. If it doesn’t work in Hawaii, how’s it going to work anywhere else? The reality is the U.S. is worse at coronavirus for several reasons. First, we’re a federation. We don’t have a strong central government (the feds) when it comes to domestic authority. The vast majority of coronavirus is state and local. It wouldn’t even be constitutional for the president (regardless of whether it was Trump or not) to order masks. Second, we’re a huge country with significant intra-country travel. You can’t really legally shutdown travel between the states. Third, we are a country in which shopping malls are the norm. We don’t have the kind of outdoor socialization spaces that Europe has. Fourth, the reason why coronavirus is spiking in Florida and Arizona is partly because these are states where a lot of people spend considerable time in air conditioning inside.

    – Franz Christian

    Hawaii reported 28 new COVID cases on July 10. They’re not closed because of an internal outbreak. They’re closed because of outbreaks everywhere else.

  28. “It’s likely beyond containment for the majority of the country at this point. Thousands will die needlessly.”

    Let’s not pretend this was ever about containment. The line has always been “flatten the curve”. A side benefit of that is it would give us a hypothetical chance to get a vaccine developed– which may or may not happen.
    Nobody anywhere was naive enough to think we could contain it. When people start dying because we don’t have the hospital resources to save them, that’s the line that shouldn’t be crossed.

    Doesn’t sound like Hawaii could even handle a packed hotel fire in terms of hospital capacity.

    “They’re not closed because of an internal outbreak. They’re closed because of outbreaks everywhere else.”

    —- it sounds to me like a little of both. From the article:
    “Hawaii has seen an average of over two dozen cases per day in the past week, and it’s feared that number could continue to grow even without visitors being allowed in.”

    And remember, for every 1 case confirmed, it could be 8-25+ that hasn’t been.

  29. David asked: “Sorry to ask a dumb question, but if Hawaii has been closed since March, how are they seeing an average of two dozen cases a day in the past week? If that is true, then how does shutting down the economy anywhere make sense?”

    According to one Flyertalk poster, there are several groups exempt from quarantine (military, family of arrivees, etc). It may even be >50% of arrivees that don’t need to quarantine.

    Also, enforcement of quarantine is probably less rigorous than places like Asia who take this extremely seriously and have generally done a stellar job of containment.

  30. @Points Adventure: Even Hawaii citizens can’t return to Hawaii without quarantining. At least for tourists, there have been numerous cases of people being arrested or paid to be deported from Hawaii. Who knows how rigorous the enforcement is outside Waikiki and the tourist areas elsewhere, but at least in these places the police are strict. A friend is a lawyer who had to fly to Honolulu to argue a case. She had to get special permission from the State of Hawaii to be exempt and allowed to leave her hotel for court arguments. Even then she was ESCORTED by a police officer to and from court to ensure compliance.

  31. Hawaii is going to be in a depression soon if they aren’t already. The state was already in a really bad position fiscally before this. Hawaii was at or near the lists for the most outbound moves. Outside of maybe the Big Island, most of the islands are unaffordable.

  32. From Hawaii News Now’s headline today:

    “ This continues Hawaii’s upward trend as the health department reported 28 new COVID-19 cases on Friday.
    Hawaii News Now has learned that 13 of those cases were the result of community spread and four were travel related. The other cases are unknown or still under investigation.”

    Even being an isolated island with an extremely strict travel quarantine in place, the virus is spreading in the community there. It’s already there, and it won’t stop spreading without an unimaginably intolerable statewide lockdown (as in, no grocery shopping, no takeout food, essential workers isolated from their families, no going outside at all).

    Even in the “success stories” of New Zealand, Vietnam, Taiwan… which add did an admirable job of responding and closing their borders early… there will be more outbreaks in the future if they ever, EVER crack open the door to people entering from elsewhere. Probably forever.

    Vaccines? Yeah, maybe one will be identified this year or next. It will be moderately but not perfectly protective. And then it will take several more years to manufacture billions of doses, and another couple years to possibly distribute them globally, all as countries viciously fight over access and cost. Meanwhile, the virus could easily mutate its protein spikes to render the vaccine ineffective, so we have to redevelop another vaccine.

    The bottom line is: this virus is infectious enough, with a long enough incubation period before tests even detect it, and not *deadly enough* to self-limit, that no place on Earth will be able to eliminate and prevent its spread long-term.

    Are Hawaii, New Zealand, Taiwan, South Korea, ready to stay closed to outsiders… not “until there’s a vaccine,” but until most people have immunity through vaccine or recovery? That could be 3-5 years from now.

    -https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2020/07/10/hawaii-reports-new-covid-cases-bringing-statewide-total/

  33. This pandemic started with a single person. I don’t understand why people think it will go away anytime soon. It seems to me, that it will be here forever and we have to learn to live, or die, with it for the rest of eternity. Like the common cold, which is also a corona virus, also sans vaccine and herd immunity.

  34. It’s not complicated.

    No, those countries don’t have to stay closed to everyone for 3-5 years. Just to people from places where too many behave like idiots and have allowed the virus to spread without any management. The US, Brazil, Russia, and handful of other nations lead by fascist morons and populated by ignorant fools who don’t believe in science.

    The EU, and countries from Australia to Thailand to South Korea…they did what was needed, they took the short-term economic hit for shutting down tight for a while, and now, for them, life is starting to get back to something approaching normal. Residents of those countries will soon enjoy the ability to travel – some already are, others will relatively soon.

    The idiot countries – US, Russia, Brazil – will have to sit things out for a much longer time. Until we have a change in government, and until the freedumb-loving denialists start behaving like adults instead of spoiled 3-year olds. So 3-5 years won’t be needed for Canadians or Koreans, but for Murkins, it’s gonna be a long time.

  35. People should start sincerly realising how bad the situation is. Everyone should honestly follow the health measures and social distancing. Going for holiday or non essential travels will only help the spreading. If it stays like this, the states like Hawaii would not have a chance but to close inter states travel and impose for everone travelling a 14 days quarantine, to finally get the people follow the rules and decrease the infection rate.

  36. Franz Christian says: “It wouldn’t even be constitutional for the president (regardless of whether it was Trump or not) to order masks.”

    Please cite the section or clause of the U.S. Constitution that you say would be violated by a mask order from the president.

  37. @Luke

    NY has TWICE as many deaths as any other state.

    TWICE as many.

    That’s not any sort of success.

    And to repeat…NY was not prepared and the idiots who run the state and the city are to blame.

  38. @Dick Bupkiss
    The death rate from Covid-19 in Russia is much lower than in the US. Only Utah, Idaho, Oregon, W. Virginia, Wyoming, Montana, Alaska and Hawaii have lower death rates than Russia. And not by much. The worst US states in terms of Covid-19 deaths are New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Every single one of them is worse than any other country in the world (San Marino village excluded)

  39. CVS is only testing over age 12
    Rite aid age 18+

    Rite Aid/ Google’s is due to “important privacy disclaimer’ parntners and researchers get access to your personal information Likely maintaining DNA databases .

    The 72 hour before travel is a moot point. cities and test labs are swamped: big cities like LAS who have national guard support had same day appointments every 15min increment in May.
    Results took 12-24 hours in May.

    Same test site now has no appointments for 5 days and test results will be delayed for 4-6 days after testing due to both labs overwhelmed and limited supplies Therefore, completely unusable for travel.

    Let alone the REAL important need: school/teacher/daycare/worker testing. not just discretionary vacation travel

  40. If you think “this isn’t complicated”, then I don’t know what to tell you, except to pay closer attention. This is the most horrendously, mind-bogglingly complicated thing to happen to the world in a century. Go ahead and glibly declare that simply sorting travelers by nationality is a sure fire strategy to prevent further outbreaks. I guess you missed the fact that Hawaii *is part of the US*, and that it’s already been strictly limiting travel for months… and it still is experiencing an outbreak. There are 195 countries, and tens of thousands of possible bilateral relationships between them through which people sneak through. People can and do hold passports in multiple countries, and live in countries that aren’t their own. You’re simple answer is just ban all Americans from everywhere, problem solved? Wow. Even if you could, and did, it wouldn’t do a damn thing to stop this from infecting every corner of the world.

  41. @DavidB – Article I, Section I of the Constitution reads as follows:

    “All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.”

    No president is a dictator who can just make his will known.

  42. @David and @DavidB: Also the 10th Amendment. The federal courts would almost certainty rule that an executive order by the president mandating masks is unconstitutional because under federalism that’s a state power.

  43. Fake title: all they know is that they are to remain closed until at least 31 August, not when they’re reopening.

    Nobody, not even them, knows when that date will be, as the calendar is set by containing the virus in the rest of the US, which in turn is set by the chaos that is Trump’s “war on the coronavirus”.

    Sad, really.

  44. @ Wilhelm — you just show your ignorance. Do some reading and research, watch less propaganda on FoxNews. All of that information is available on Google

  45. @grrizzly past deaths doesn’t matter to today’s travel. They may matter to divisive politicians but are of no import on what’s going on today with COVID.

    New daily infection and new daily death rates are all that matters.

  46. @Reed I think by “Americans” people here are referring to residents of the USA, no matter what their passport, not passport-holders of the US that reside outside of the US.

    COVID does not infect based on passport.

  47. Who is this “Jake” guy and why is he coming back to this thread days later to post his bizarre political rants? I thought this was a travel blog.

  48. To all the idiots out there: Cancun is open. So desperate for cash, they ll gladly welcome you!

    Covid-express flights depart daily from DFW and MIA.

  49. @Franz Christian – your point about “It wouldn’t even be constitutional for the president (regardless of whether it was Trump or not) to order masks” is truly asinine…just think for a second about what you wrote there.

  50. @Jason – we know how you feel about NY – will you also mention that Trump did a HORRIBLE job too?

  51. I know the internet isn’t really the place for rational discussion, but what would be a good way to reopen the state? And why does a test within 72 hours even matter? A lot can happen in the three days after I get tested and then fly 10 hours to HNL. Or are we just screwed until the vaccine?

  52. Tough call to make. HI governor is kind of damned if he does open to travel & damned if he doesn’t open to travel. Here in NJ I can easily get a tested for the virus. Getting the test results is another issue. The labs are so back logged that I’d have no guarantee of getting the test results back in time for a scheduled trip to HI. I’m thinking / hoping maybe by Christmas, HI will open to tourism in a responsible way.

  53. Think of the coronavirus like fire, where some places are burned and some places aren’t. Infected people are sparks. Throw some sparks into a dry forest, most won’t cause a fire, but a select few will (“superspreaders”). Not all small fires will turn to infernos, but some will (superspreaders going into crowded areas).

    All infections aren’t all equally likely to do so, but once an inferno (a big outbreak) starts, it’s hard to tamp it down, and the strategy to do so is much different than containment of the sparks or small fires. New Zealand has only ever had to deal with sparks. South Korea, Japan, and Hawaii have only had to deal with small fires so far.

    Hawaii is like an extremely dry, unburned area with tons of kindling. A few sparks (people) getting there and most are getting caught in quarantine. Some fires are already burning, many likely unnoticed (community outbreaks on some of the neighbor islands).

    Until the fire is completely out everywhere, not only does Hawaii need to keep its mainland quarantine in place, it probably needs to stay in lockdown. Everywhere does. The idea that any place, or any state, could “reopen” without total external isolation, and expect to be able to control the inflow of virus, is a fallacy. Some places might do it after they have already been torched to hell, like New York or Italy. But a mostly-untouched place reopening to outside travelers before the total end of the pandemic? No way is that going to be possible.

  54. A needed move. Look, Hawaii is an island state. The medical facilities for the one plus million population cannot handle any large Covid-19 outbreak. The main medical center for the state is in Honolulu, Queens. Aside from this the only other large military facility is the U.S. Army’s Tripler Medical Center. It is not a public health facility and would be swamped with civilian cases if there was an outbreak. Hawaii hosts important U.S. military headquarters and units for the Pacific. The last thing that is needed is a calamity that would erode the mission readiness at a time when the Communist Chinese threat is growing. Do read about what is going on, the big picture. Vacation to Hawaii is the least of the concerns at this time.

  55. @Dick Buttkiss life is getting back to normal in Australia? They just implemented mass lockdowns again. And Thailand? Where one imported case from Egypt has turned into such a nationwide panic it makes the toilet paper hoarding sprees in the USA and Australia look sane. And while Taiwan and SK reacted in an exceptional manner, they also didn’t get hit initially with the D614G mutation believed to be up to 10x more contagious that ravaged countries later on. You say residents of some of those countries are free to travel now? Name them.

  56. I’m fortunate to have traveled to every Hawaiian island many times and I’m scheduled to go back in October. I’m worried there may not be a tourist economy left to reopen. Locals can’t afford many restaurants dependent on tourists in areas such as Lahaina and Kaanapali so I wonder how they will survive this shutdown. Many hotel owners have to be contemplating bankruptcy and many even wonder if Hawaiian Airlines will survive. The lack of Japanese tourists is really hurting Honolulu. The lockdown could be setting this economy back 100 years.

  57. I’ll echo what others said

    There is no way to assure yourself of a Covid test that can be done and resulted in 72 hours

    My system does thousands of tests per day. We are one of the leaders in the country.
    We recently decided to allow travel related tests.

    The surge has meant that everyone country-wide is short on reagents again.
    Especially the reference laboratories

    Thus: Current wait time is 5 days for travel. (It was 48 hours last week)

    There are some technical advances coming in the next few months That will increase testing

    The problem is, other things will be prioritized over travel such as
    – return to work and/or school testing
    – recurrent congregate Care testing
    – contact tracing
    – weekly tests for health care workers
    – post Covid test to ensure negative status
    – pre clinic Covid test (have an appointment? First need negative test)

    Thus will eat up the “surplus”

    Barring a miracle, Travel is dead until summer at the earliest.

  58. Hawaii could realistically allow tourism from Asia to resume with a Covid test but keep the 14 day quarantine in place US mainlanders. That of course would draw all sorts of unwarranted criticism.

  59. Yes I’m sure the people of Hawaii are traveling to the mainland. They are still subject to the 14 day quarantine upon arrival…

  60. According to an article in the WSJ, China seems to be moving away from CV-19. Why? Of course, one has to be skeptical with anything from that bunch so we’ll see…. It must be their strong central CCP that deserves the credit.

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