JetBlue Cuts Transatlantic Flying In Winter

JetBlue Cuts Transatlantic Flying In Winter

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Earlier I wrote about how JetBlue is introducing Mint on several new routes. However, I wanted to separately cover what’s probably a much bigger story — JetBlue is cutting its transatlantic flights for winter, as clearly the service is not succeeding in the way the airline hoped.

JetBlue cutting unprofitable transatlantic flights

In the summer of 2021, we saw JetBlue gradually launch transatlantic service, using newly delivered Airbus A321LRs. The JetBlue passenger experience is absolutely phenomenal, so from a comfort and value perspective, I’m delighted to see JetBlue’s growth across the Atlantic.

However, I’ve been skeptical about the economics of this service since launch:

  • Transatlantic market share is heavily dominated by the “big three” joint ventures, and it can be hard for a newcomer to compete
  • A321LRs are capable planes in terms of range, though with a fairly low capacity plus limited cargo capabilities, it can be tough to profitably fly these small planes into major airports
  • The challenge with transatlantic flying is how seasonal demand is, especially with JetBlue overwhelmingly going after leisure travelers
  • Some major European airports are slot controlled, so securing the right to fly to key airports is no small task; JetBlue has done a surprisingly good job forcing its way into these airports

Up until now, JetBlue has continued to grow across the Atlantic, and has clearly viewed the Atlantic as a growth market where losses were just going to happen for some amount of time.

However, JetBlue’s new CEO has made it clear that the company needs to take a close look at its transatlantic service, and once routes reach a maturity point, they should only be kept around if they’re profitable. We’re now seeing the results of that analysis, as JetBlue is making its first material cuts across the Atlantic, as flagged by @xJonNYC:

  • JetBlue’s routes from Boston (BOS) and New York (JFK) to London Gatwick (LGW) will become seasonal, and will be suspended for winter
  • JetBlue’s route from New York (JFK) to Paris (CDG) will be reduced from twice daily to once daily for winter

This means that during the winter season, JetBlue will operate:

  • 2x daily New York (JFK) to London Heathrow (LHR) flights
  • 1x daily Boston (BOS) to London Heathrow (LHR) flights
  • 1x daily New York (JFK) to Amsterdam (AMS) flights
  • 1x daily Boston (BOS) to Amsterdam (AMS) flights
  • 1x daily New York (JFK) to Paris (CDG) flights
  • 1x daily Boston (BOS) to Paris (CDG) flights

Dropping three of the planned 10 daily transatlantic frequencies for winter is a pretty significant reduction. In summer, JetBlue will then restore the above frequencies, and will also operate service to Dublin (DUB) and Edinburgh (EDI).

JetBlue ordered Airbus A321LRs for these flights

Can JetBlue succeed with a seasonal Europe strategy?

I can’t say I’m surprised that Europe isn’t turning out to be a cash cow for JetBlue. Former JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes seemed to suggest this transatlantic service would be a turning point for JetBlue, though I’m not surprised it hasn’t worked out that way.

Seasonally it’s easy enough to make money across the Atlantic, while winter is a different story. This is something that a countless number of airlines have learned the hard way over the years.

The only way to make money across the Atlantic in winter is to control many lucrative corporate contracts, and to command very high fares in premium cabins. Furthermore it requires having a huge network of connecting traffic, so that people can continue to Africa, India, etc. That’s something that JetBlue has clearly been struggling with.

I think the logical question is whether JetBlue may plan more fundamental changes to its Europe strategy, or if this is the extent of the changes. Essentially, can JetBlue make the economics work of flying these premium A321s to Europe in summer, and then to other counter seasonal leisure destinations in winter?

On the surface, it doesn’t seem like a terrible strategy, especially with hubs in Boston and New York, where people are most definitely looking for warm weather in the winter. So it shouldn’t be too tough to shift Mint demand to places like the Caribbean, California, etc.

But still, JetBlue’s A321LRs are in a really premium configuration, with a low total seat count. I can’t help but wonder if JetBlue may end up reconfiguring its A321LRs with a bit less premium of a configuration, to better reflect the demand mix for markets where the plane could be used.

Obviously when the A321LR was ordered, the hope was that these planes would have all their business class seated filled year-round across the Atlantic, and that this service would consistently make sense. But if these planes are going to be flying six months per year to other destinations, is this still the right layout for the aircraft?

JetBlue’s A321LRs are in a premium configuration

Bottom line

JetBlue plans to significantly reduce its transatlantic service as of this upcoming winter. The airline will be eliminating three of its planned 10 frequencies, cutting Boston and New York to London Gatwick altogether, as well as cutting one of the daily New York to Paris flights.

Up until now, JetBlue has been willing to sustain losses across the Atlantic, thinking the markets haven’t yet reached maturity. JetBlue’s new management team is much more focused on having the airline return to profitability ASAP, and that includes making some tough decisions with transatlantic service.

What do you make of JetBlue’s transatlantic route cuts?

Conversations (49)
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  1. JF Guest

    This is specific to LHR, but:

    JetBlue - no lounge on either end of the Atlantic, narrowbody plane, not really that good of a loyalty program, perhaps a bit better service, less frequency, worse on-time performance

    BA/AA/DL/VS/UA: Have meal in lounge before flight, maximize sleep onboard. Arrivals lounge at LHR to have breakfast and a shower. Lots of frequencies in case of op issues. Robust mileage programs.

    Cost: Not really that much of a...

    This is specific to LHR, but:

    JetBlue - no lounge on either end of the Atlantic, narrowbody plane, not really that good of a loyalty program, perhaps a bit better service, less frequency, worse on-time performance

    BA/AA/DL/VS/UA: Have meal in lounge before flight, maximize sleep onboard. Arrivals lounge at LHR to have breakfast and a shower. Lots of frequencies in case of op issues. Robust mileage programs.

    Cost: Not really that much of a difference. I've even seen JetBlue cost more than the big carriers which makes no sense given the product offering.

    Literally no reason to fly JetBlue to London unless it's 30% cheaper (which it never is)

  2. vlcnc Guest

    JetBlue's small A321LR's make no sense being sent to large airports like London Heathrow or Amsterdam Schiphol. These planes were designed to make long and thin long-haul flights economical and it makes no sense sending a tiny capacity plane to a slot restricted hubs. The only way it might have worked is if they had a lot of frequency but as we know slots are hard to come by at these airports. I think JetBlue...

    JetBlue's small A321LR's make no sense being sent to large airports like London Heathrow or Amsterdam Schiphol. These planes were designed to make long and thin long-haul flights economical and it makes no sense sending a tiny capacity plane to a slot restricted hubs. The only way it might have worked is if they had a lot of frequency but as we know slots are hard to come by at these airports. I think JetBlue should focus on regional underserved markets in the UK - Edinburgh is a good shout as would be Manchester here to start, but Birmingham and Newcastle would probably also good to consider. Emirates really focused early on serving the regions in the UK and have been massively successful in siphoning of traffic away from BA and Heathrow going east - before they arrived, in the 90's you always had to make your way to Heathrow or Gatwick to connect elsewhere, they gamechanged that and I think JetBlue need to focus on doing similar for transatlantic flights.

    1. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      Not sure why people keep repeating things like this.

      JetBlue has zero reason to care about what "makes sense" in a macro perspective, since it doesn't have widebodies, and isn't publicly known to be acquiring them any time soon. Is their offer the most objectively advantageous? No. Does that matter to anyone to whom their offer fits their schedule/FFP/status/etc? No as well.

      Aviation authorities may have reason to consider capacity-per-cycle, but since the Open Skies...

      Not sure why people keep repeating things like this.

      JetBlue has zero reason to care about what "makes sense" in a macro perspective, since it doesn't have widebodies, and isn't publicly known to be acquiring them any time soon. Is their offer the most objectively advantageous? No. Does that matter to anyone to whom their offer fits their schedule/FFP/status/etc? No as well.

      Aviation authorities may have reason to consider capacity-per-cycle, but since the Open Skies bilateral between the relevant authorities (here) isn't written for that purpose, any such objection would require bilateral agreement/concession, which also hasn't happened.

      So for the TL/DR version:
      B6 doesn't give a crap if some AvGeek thinks an A321 is too small for ___ airport.

      It's what they have, it's what they'll use.

    2. vlcnc Guest

      It's not an avgeek opinion, it make sense commercially too for the reasons explained. Icelandair operate widebodies to Heathrow and Gatwick for capacity reasons, because they operate a hub model and those airports are capacity restricted, but they are also able to make lots of long and thin routes work precisely because they operate a lot of narrowbodies.

  3. Stan Morris Guest

    During the winter JetBlue should try changing their schedule to arrive in Europe about 2:00pm, so travelers can arrive at their hotel when check in begins. Convenience is almost as important as price.

  4. Jordan Guest

    Jetblue must be cutting a lot more than just transatlantic. Got an email today that my flight Feb 2025 from JFK to PVR is being cancelled since all service to PVR will be discontinued as of June 12 2024. No rebooking, full cancel, meaning the dot has been removed completely from their map.

  5. D.K. Robertson Guest

    Disappointing to hear ! Will be sure not to fly JetBlue again.

  6. Exit Row Seat Guest

    B6 can’t rely solely on BOS and NYC to support its Euro footprint considering its connects with the rest of the country are god awful.
    As also alluded to in this string, B6 needs a partner on the other side of the Pond to populate seats both ways on transatlantic flights year round.
    Culling flights won’t solve B6’s long term problems.

  7. Throwawayname Guest

    The obvious solution would be for B6 to partner with a European carrier which isn't part of the JVs, however the most obvious candidates are TP and UX, and they are both in the process of getting sold off.

    Presumably their planes can't reach the likes of ATH, BEG, SOF, RIX etc, so that probably only leaves AT and CMN as a (theoretical) possibility for a partnership- can't see that happening, but if it did it'd get them a bunch of lucrative African destinations.

    1. simmonad Member

      easyJet would be an obvious partner but a) EZY already have an agreement with Virgin Atlantic; and b) EZY dominates Gatwick, where B6 is culling flights for the winter season.

    2. Throwawayname Guest

      easyJet aren't really geared up for connections, it's just not part of the business model.

  8. julian zentner Guest

    All airlines reduce transatlantic capacity in the winter but Jet Blue are reducing services throughout their network already so not really a big surprise considering they are bleeding cash and need to cut costs significantly.

  9. Pakmann2k Guest

    Interesting. Having clicked on the link and read the entire list, I like it. Expansion from Puerto Rico to more of the islands is a good move, AA used to have a very successful hub in SJU and it is nice to see someone else pick this up. Flying to SJU is easy and cheap now so I wouldn't mind flying there in J class and then taking a cheap ride in an RJ to...

    Interesting. Having clicked on the link and read the entire list, I like it. Expansion from Puerto Rico to more of the islands is a good move, AA used to have a very successful hub in SJU and it is nice to see someone else pick this up. Flying to SJU is easy and cheap now so I wouldn't mind flying there in J class and then taking a cheap ride in an RJ to my final destination. I am sick of flying out of MIA for this.

    Side note, I live in PHX and having Mint added to all 3 of our daily flights for the winter will be successful. I use AA and DL for JFK and BOS as they are the only carriers that fly non-stop to these cities other than B6. B6 is cheaper but for those long rides, who doesn't prefer the comfort of a J class seat if one is available. With Delta and AA flying A321Neos and the occasional 737 for these routes, Mint will sell quite well with the prospect of a lay-flat seat. AA has been dabbling with 777s for PHX-JFK recently as well, it is a very popular route.

    This reminds me of the AA post-Covid schedule, they moved their long haul aircraft (widebodies for AA) to many long domestic routes during the winter and people really liked it until they got their Europe cities back up to speed.

    1. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      This will be B6's second time attempting to build up SJU as a hub.... and they had lower costs the last time they tried.

  10. sunviking82 Guest

    Really MINT to PHX. First BOS and NYC doesn't come to PHX, they go to Florida. PHX is more Midwest and Pacific NW visitors so this is just a money loser. Plus AA has a hub here with many flights a day to both cities and at much better times and DL and SWA also have frequency so. . .more bad ideas from B6. Can't wait for the AA and B6 merger announcement after they both file for bankruptcy.

    1. Biglaw V10 Partner Guest

      PHX is, impressively, growing in sectors that bring in higher margin business travel.

    2. DT Guest

      PHX? High margin? Business travelers? Same sentence? Not happening. Phoenix, San Diego, Tampa, EWR, Detroit, and their ilk are tier 2 cities that draw lower margin travelers or transit only customers. As end markets they command far lower margin- customer type is different to SFO, LAX, JFK, MIA, ORD, or even SEA to some extent.

    3. Truthsayer Guest

      Unfortunately, intelligence is not one of Biglaw's strengths. They are most likely a DEI hire to fill their firms quota.

  11. Jack Guest

    Significant LoL. This page so want JB to leave Europe to the big 3 and make this headline when in reality is just 1 city going seasonal that was already on the 321NS so the 321XL will still be fully used. Just hating on jetblue crossing the pond.

    1. James Guest

      Except it’s not. It’s just reporting on a scaling back of an airline’s already small transatlantic service. It’s very notable.

    2. Ivan X Guest

      Ben *loves* Mint and thinks the big three are mediocre. Bro do u even read

  12. Finixyta Guest

    Interesting to see JetBlue scaling back its transatlantic flights for the winter season. It's not surprising given the seasonal demand patterns across the Atlantic. I'm curious to see how JetBlue will adapt its strategy to make the economics work for its A321LRs. Will they reconfigure the planes to better suit the demand mix for leisure destinations in the winter? It's also worth noting that JetBlue's focus on premium cabins may not be the best fit...

    Interesting to see JetBlue scaling back its transatlantic flights for the winter season. It's not surprising given the seasonal demand patterns across the Atlantic. I'm curious to see how JetBlue will adapt its strategy to make the economics work for its A321LRs. Will they reconfigure the planes to better suit the demand mix for leisure destinations in the winter? It's also worth noting that JetBlue's focus on premium cabins may not be the best fit for the winter season, when demand is more focused on leisure travel. Looking forward to seeing how JetBlue evolves its transatlantic strategy in the coming years

  13. Timtamtrak Diamond

    Somewhat off-topic comment, but thrilled to see it looks like they are adding Bonaire as a destination. It is an awesome Caribbean island destination that is seriously under served.

  14. Willem Guest

    I imagine they’re cutting everything that doesn’t have slot restrictions like LHR, AMS and I forget if CDG has slot utilisation rules. Not surprised at all LGW is gone

  15. WB Guest

    @Ben - Sorry this is unrelated, but I have a question. I just read that Citi is planning on closing the Premier Card to new applicants as of tommorow, and they're going to replace it with a new credit card called the Citi Strata. I was planning on applying for the Citi Premier. Do you think I should go ahead and apply today, or do you think the new Strata card would be more competitive...

    @Ben - Sorry this is unrelated, but I have a question. I just read that Citi is planning on closing the Premier Card to new applicants as of tommorow, and they're going to replace it with a new credit card called the Citi Strata. I was planning on applying for the Citi Premier. Do you think I should go ahead and apply today, or do you think the new Strata card would be more competitive in terms of benefits. Do you know anything about the new Citi Strata card? Do you know if it would be possible to switch from the Premier to the Strata in the future? Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    https://frequentmiler.com/citi-axing-premier-card-on-may-9-launching-strata-premier-card-on-may-16/

  16. Tim Dunn Diamond

    everyone can make money flying the Atlantic in the summer and most of the spring and fall.
    The winter is a whole 'nother story.
    JBLU is being run now by people that have to make the airline work financially - exactly what I have repeatedly said is the real reason that US and most global airlines must exist.
    Some airlines can get by w/ carrying losses in parts of their network even...

    everyone can make money flying the Atlantic in the summer and most of the spring and fall.
    The winter is a whole 'nother story.
    JBLU is being run now by people that have to make the airline work financially - exactly what I have repeatedly said is the real reason that US and most global airlines must exist.
    Some airlines can get by w/ carrying losses in parts of their network even at lower reduced system profitability. B6 is no longer one of those airlines.

    B6 could potentially shuffle some aircraft around to put more Mint aircraft where they can attract good revenue but SJU to anywhere doesn't seem to be that kind of market.

    And ultimately the A321NEOs can be reconfigured to a less premium configuration if B6 finds they simply cannot use such a premium configuration on a year round basis.

    1. Willem Guest

      Global Airlines would like to have a word…

    2. Timtamtrak Diamond

      So would Norwegian.

  17. john otoole Guest

    Profitability Vs Availability.
    It’s an age old problem. It reminds me when I was with Northwest Orient in the early 80s. We were flying all 747-200’s across the Atlantic mainly from JFK, BOS & MSP. Summer was filled with leisure travel and boat loads of cash, extra cargo in both in directions. Winter comes along, bye, bye leisure and not enough of First Class passengers to cover costs. Reduce schedule, business travelers go away...

    Profitability Vs Availability.
    It’s an age old problem. It reminds me when I was with Northwest Orient in the early 80s. We were flying all 747-200’s across the Atlantic mainly from JFK, BOS & MSP. Summer was filled with leisure travel and boat loads of cash, extra cargo in both in directions. Winter comes along, bye, bye leisure and not enough of First Class passengers to cover costs. Reduce schedule, business travelers go away citing the need for daily service. Candidly, problem was only solved with KL partnership and focus on Hub to Hub transatlantic flying. Without a European partner and strong US Hubs, I don’t see where Jet Blue can profitably go.

  18. Biglaw V10 Partner Guest

    JetBlue’s Achilles heel is their JFK terminal. I’ve connected there one time around dinner, assuming JFK of all airports would have acceptable food options. Nope! Just look at the Google maps ratings of any food outlet in the terminal where JetBlue operates. Out of desperation I did buy Caribbean jerk chicken with beans. The lady serving me was miserable. The man at the cash register was also miserable, said no words whatsoever, and zoned out...

    JetBlue’s Achilles heel is their JFK terminal. I’ve connected there one time around dinner, assuming JFK of all airports would have acceptable food options. Nope! Just look at the Google maps ratings of any food outlet in the terminal where JetBlue operates. Out of desperation I did buy Caribbean jerk chicken with beans. The lady serving me was miserable. The man at the cash register was also miserable, said no words whatsoever, and zoned out after my receipt printed, causing me to wait awkwardly as he came back to his senses and hand me the receipt.

    These folks aren’t JetBlue staff, who were great in my interactions with them. But they do contribute to the ground experience of traveling with JetBlue.

    1. yoloswag420 Guest

      This is so out of touch. People do not make flight decisions based off of food options in a terminal. I'm pretty sure most people know how to eat at home before a flight.

      People make flight decisions based off of the actual cost of the tickets, operational reliablity, and these types of tangible factors. No one has ever said I won't fly Jetblue because JFK T5 restaurants aren't good enough for me.

      What JetBlue...

      This is so out of touch. People do not make flight decisions based off of food options in a terminal. I'm pretty sure most people know how to eat at home before a flight.

      People make flight decisions based off of the actual cost of the tickets, operational reliablity, and these types of tangible factors. No one has ever said I won't fly Jetblue because JFK T5 restaurants aren't good enough for me.

      What JetBlue needs to do is to fix their terrible on-time performance, get their FF program where it needs to be, and have a clear strategy.

    2. Anthony Diamond

      I disagree with yolo - ground experience, including availability of lounges, does impact flight booking decisions, especially when it comes to premium cabins.

    3. Biglaw V10 Partner Guest

      yoloswag420 and Anthony both make valid points, but to clarify:

      1. Re: eating at the airport. JFK is not only an origin airport. It's also a connection airport. Either way, I often like to eat in the airport after clearing TSA. I'm sure there are lots of people like me. Even though eating at the airport means spending more for lower quality food, I value the logistical simplicity and the peace of mind. I'm the...

      yoloswag420 and Anthony both make valid points, but to clarify:

      1. Re: eating at the airport. JFK is not only an origin airport. It's also a connection airport. Either way, I often like to eat in the airport after clearing TSA. I'm sure there are lots of people like me. Even though eating at the airport means spending more for lower quality food, I value the logistical simplicity and the peace of mind. I'm the type of person who arrives 2 hours prior to a domestic departure, despite having only carry-ons and having CLEAR with TSA PreCheck.

      2. Re: not flying JetBlue because the food in the airport sucks. It sounds silly, but consumer decisions - not just by me, but the overwhelming majority of consumers - are made on an irrational basis. Nobel prizes have been awarded for research in behavioral economics. Perhaps if food was the only shortcoming, if the JFK terminal was bright and airy like post-renovation LGA, then the mood of travelers would shift in JetBlue's favor. But as it stands the JFK terminal is architecturally dreary, too. It's just not a pleasant space to be in, whether or not you're eating.

    4. yoloswag420 Guest

      People that base their decisions based on an airport terminal's food quality are people whose opinion I don't care about.

      No one should ever expect airport food to be good or well-priced. Food outside of the airport is drastically cheaper and high quality. People that waste money on airport food and then complain about it are not people in touch with reality.

    5. Biglaw V10 Partner Guest

      You're dull and you're not aware of it because you're too dull to realize. Not your fault, our IQ is in our genes. But I'm telling you right now: Your opinion is the opinion of a dull person.

    6. yoloswag420 Guest

      You should really stop embarassing yourself. Every comment you make on this site is cringeworthy.

      I recommend seeing a psychiatrist for your severe mental disabilities.

    7. Biglaw V10 Partner Guest

      Are you Taiwanese?

    8. Sam Guest

      I had the Caribbean pork at that place. Not bad and the portion was generous. The worker spooned some pan drippings over the pork, which made it moist, but it otherwise had no spice.

      What Jetblue really needs is a premium lounge at JFK and BOS.

  19. Alec Member

    Too bad they don’t have the range to shift winter flying out of FLL to Europe

  20. SMR Guest

    These are such small cuts...why the title that may mislead people ?
    ZERO cuts in summer and LGW vut from JFK/BOS in winter is small considering LHR is well served. CDG loses a 2nd daily flight but again...its already served form both cities. These are really small cuts.

    1. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ SMR — I’m confused, what’s misleading about the title? It says that JetBlue is reducing transatlantic flying in winter, and that’s exactly what the airline is doing.

      I wouldn’t call a 30% cut in capacity in winter “really small,” especially at a time when the airline is still taking delivery of A321LRs, and should ostensibly be growing its transatlantic network.

    2. 3NL Guest

      Well BOS-LGW was already seasonal and the second JFK-CDG that has become seasonal hadn’t even started yet. That context I think makes the seasonality less dramatic.

      So instead of “cutting 30%” a more accurate statement to me would’ve been JFK-LGW is going seasonal too, and the second JFK-CDG frequency is tweaked to be seasonal. So unless you can cut something that didn’t exist, it’s more cutting 10% if anything.

    3. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ 3NL -- That's simply not true. Up until yesterday, BOS-LGW was still on sale for winter (and I have screenshots), as was the second daily JFK-CDG flight. The airline has cut 30% of its planned winter transatlantic schedule. We can try to frame things however we'd like to make it sound better or different, but those are the facts.

    4. 3NL Guest

      Last winter BOS-LGW certainly did not fly year round. Tickets were sold for year round service but service was suspended from early January to March. I suppose we're dancing in the semantics weeds but how I view it, BOS-LGW was already only flown intermittently last winter, so the seasonal announcement for the upcoming winter doesn't seem like much of a change, likewise tweaking a plan for a flight that hasn't even launched yet in the...

      Last winter BOS-LGW certainly did not fly year round. Tickets were sold for year round service but service was suspended from early January to March. I suppose we're dancing in the semantics weeds but how I view it, BOS-LGW was already only flown intermittently last winter, so the seasonal announcement for the upcoming winter doesn't seem like much of a change, likewise tweaking a plan for a flight that hasn't even launched yet in the case of the second JFK-CDG.

      The only flight that flew last winter continuously (or has flown at all to begin with) that is being cut is JFK - LGW. Perhaps you might not agree with the framing of my first paragraph but the previous sentence is a fact.

    5. Alec Member

      30% cut shows a pretty big gap between initial strategy/ambitions and new plans

    6. Ryan Guest

      Where was the lie in what Ben said? Sorry you don’t like the facts, the reality is JetBlue is a slow sinking ship and he’s just reporting the latest development.

    7. LovetoFly Guest

      After reading the article I would not call the title misleading at all. The truth is JetBlue is cutting some routes across the Atlantic for this upcoming winter season. The article even included JetBlue's full winter schedule so readers would know the routes that are continuing to operate and made sure to mention the suspended routes will resume next year for summer travel season along with routes to EDI and DUB.

  21. PDS Guest

    As a non alliance carrier, B6 really isn’t going to successfully command the sort of high premium cabin fares and steal share from the big 3 with their extensive corp contracts; especially those based in UK and Europe who need a Euro network option. Their pricing strategy needs to be more aggressive to convert the user-chooser biz flyers, and to capture premium leisure travelers. And don’t get me started on reliability!

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Biglaw V10 Partner Guest

PHX is, impressively, growing in sectors that bring in higher margin business travel.

3
yoloswag420 Guest

This is so out of touch. People do not make flight decisions based off of food options in a terminal. I'm pretty sure most people know how to eat at home before a flight. People make flight decisions based off of the actual cost of the tickets, operational reliablity, and these types of tangible factors. No one has ever said I won't fly Jetblue because JFK T5 restaurants aren't good enough for me. What JetBlue needs to do is to fix their terrible on-time performance, get their FF program where it needs to be, and have a clear strategy.

3
James Guest

Except it’s not. It’s just reporting on a scaling back of an airline’s already small transatlantic service. It’s very notable.

2
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