Easiest Way To See How Many Credit Cards You’ve Opened In The Past 24 Months

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In January I wrote a post about how to check your 5/24 status. In the post I outlined a method where you can use Credit Karma to check how many accounts you’ve opened in the past 24 months. The downside to the method I outlined is that it only showed cards you’ve opened in the past 24 months that are still open, so if you closed a card that you opened within the past 24 months, it wouldn’t show there (even though it would count against the 5/24 limit).

A lot of people have asked if there’s an easy way to check your 5/24 status that also accounts for cards that have been both opened and closed in the past 24 months. The good news is that there is, and it’s super easy.

The basics of 5/24

With the 5/24 restriction, you typically won’t be approved for a Chase card if you’ve opened five or more new accounts in the past 24 months. This is more of a general guideline than a strict rule, though. Here’s what you should know about 5/24:

So if you want to be approved for cards like the Chase Sapphire Reserve® CardChase Sapphire Preferred® CardInk Business Preferred℠ Credit CardInk Business Cash℠ Credit Card, and Ink Business UnlimitedSM Credit Card, you’ll want to be aware of this restriction.

How to determine how many credit cards you’ve opened

In January I outlined a way to use Credit Karma to check your 5/24 status. The problem with the method I outlined is that it would have only shown you cards that you’ve opened in the past 24 months that are still open. In other words, the method I showed wouldn’t account for cards that you’ve opened in the past 24 months and have closed in the meantime.

The good news is that there’s a workaround to seeing these as well (thanks to Frequent Miler for finding this link). If you haven’t done so yet, the first step is to register for Credit Karma for free, which is an easy process. You’ll just need to enter some personal information and then verify some security questions, all of which should take just a couple of minutes.

Once you’re logged into your account, follow this link. This is the old Credit Karma interface that will show you the most accurate 5/24 status. Note that you’ll want to log into your Credit Karma account and then click that link, rather than clicking the link and logging in there, because that will typically return an error message.

Once you’re on that page, this is super easy. You’ll see the “Open Date” button before all your individual accounts are listed, so click that, and it will sort all of your accounts based on their opening date. I clicked it twice so that it showed my newest accounts first.

And that’s it — that will list all of your cards that have been opened, and you can then figure out how many have been opened within the past 24 months.

For example, here are the seven most recent cards that show on my report:

As you can see, my fifth most recent application was on September 13, 2016. That means that on September 13, 2018, it has technically been 24 months since my fifth most recent application, meaning that around October 1, 2018, I’d officially fall under 5/24. I guess I’ll be waiting about four months until my next credit card application!

As a reminder, you’ll want to be aware of the following:

  • Only credit cards count towards this limit, and not car loans, mortgages, etc.
  • It can sometimes take a while for recent applications to show on your report, so if you’ve applied for a card in the past few weeks, it may not be on there yet
  • Most business cards shouldn’t show there, and therefore shouldn’t count towards the limit
  • If you’re waiting for the final application that gets you below 5/24, you’ll want to wait until the beginning of the following month to apply for a card; in other words, if the card that put you over 5/24 was opened on June 5, 2016, you’ll want to wait until July 1, 2018, to apply for another card

Bottom line

The process of checking your 5/24 status with Credit Karma is free and easy. This method is better than the one I outlined in the past, since it will show you not only the cards that are still open, but also those that you closed within that timeframe.

In my case I plan to be especially disciplined here and not apply for any more non-business credit cards in the next 24 months, so that I can fall under this limit. I’m doing this so that I’ll be able to get the Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card and Ink Business UnlimitedSM Credit Card.

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Comments

  1. Good thing is if the website gets hacked and your data compromised you will be one amongst millions so Congress will do exactly zip squat.

    If businesses will sell your data with no downside you might do it yourself for a little more. On this memorial let us honor the fallen who fought to get us these non freedoms.

    Eff you republicans!

  2. 5/24 is overrated – it would cost me $1,000’s per year in opportunity cost to be that low. 20/24 is much more fun!!!

  3. Dang, it feels like forever since I applied for a new card, but I’m still over 5/24. I need to wait until September to get under so I can apply for the Chase Sapphire Reserve. Until then, maybe I’ll grab a couple of business cards…

  4. I’d suggested that the best way to know where Chase thinks you stand with respect to 5/24 is to go to Chase’s own Credit Journey utility, which provides an overview of one’s credit, including “Opened Accounts (Last 2 years)”.

    Credit Journey shows that I opened 3 accounts in the last couple of years and that is correct. My fourth new account was the Ink Business Cash I opened last week, which won’t show.

    However, some folks here have criticized Credit Journey, saying that the 5/24 picture that it provides is not consistent or congruent with Chase’s. That raises an interesting question: considering that TRANSUNION provides the credit information offered by BOTH Credit Karma and Credit Journey, why would the 5/24 picture provided by one be more reliable than that provided by the other? Please compare the two and let us know. For me they give the same picture, but I prefer Credit Journey because it is more readily accessible…through Chase!

  5. Credit Journey is TransUnion, which is also Credit Karma, which stopped providing info on opened and closed account ‘officially’, which one also needs to establish 5/24…

  6. Great article. Thx a lot for the BIG help. Now I can track my wife and my son’s 5/24 status the easy way…me? forget ’bout it!!!

  7. What do you give up to the internets when you join credit karma? On a related note, what’s the privacy hit for the rewardsnetwork credit card transaction history for miles type of business?

    Asking for a friend. So I can spy on his spending, of course.

  8. @ Ben — I opened two new AMEX cards about 7-8 weeks ago, and those do not show for me. Maybe it takes longer, but I am surprised.

  9. Have I missed something? How can anyone not know which credits cards they’ve opened and when? Seriously??

  10. Ok so it seems to me that Chase Business cards dont appear on the credit report so has no bearing on the 5/24 and also that the IHG card does appear on the report and counts towards the 5/24 but still can be approved if over the 5/24, am I correct?

  11. If I already have Chase Ink Business Preferred and Chase Ink Business Cash that I applied in the last 6 months would I have an issue getting the Business Unlimited? I’ll be 4/24 on June 1

  12. 11/24 here – I should stop applying for 15 months (end of 8/2019) to achieve 5/24 or less. I love Chase’s products, but is this wise to miss out on too many opportunities?

  13. What too many opportunities? What are you guys smoking?

    All, amex, citi, Chase, Barclays, bank of America have restrictions now. You could be 30/24 but that is not sustainable. You will come down to something like 11/24. So then just try to get under 5/24. After you get a few choose you can go wild on other cards.

    Remember try to diet till you get married. After that you can let go of yourself
    Just like most American women do. No wonder the younger guys are choosing to be gay instead. Don’t blame them

  14. US Bank also has plenty of great cards as long as you can get approved. Got 50K Delta Skypass Business and 35K+ Flexperks this year from them.

  15. Credit journey is part of a chase banking account. It shows you the 5;24 cards number you are looking for

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