American Adds Dallas To Brisbane Flights With Premium 787-9s

American Adds Dallas To Brisbane Flights With Premium 787-9s

39

A few days ago, American Airlines announced a new ultra long haul flight, which is exciting for a couple of different reasons. This flight is now on sale, so I wanted to go over all the details, including the schedule.

American will fly seasonal Dallas to Brisbane route

As of October 26, 2024, American will launch a daily seasonal flight between Dallas (DFW) and Brisbane (BNE). The flight is expected to run through late March 2025, and will operate with the following schedule:

AA7 Dallas to Brisbane departing 10:35PM arriving 5:30AM (+2 days)
AA8 Brisbane to Dallas departing 10:00AM arriving 9:20AM

The 8,303-mile flight is blocked at 15hr55min westbound and 14hr20min eastbound. Once launched, this will be American’s longest route. For that matter, it beats out American’s former longest route (discontinued years ago), which was from Dallas to Hong Kong, and covered a distance of 8,123 miles.

This flight will be operated as part of the transpacific joint venture between American and Qantas. American highlights how this route will enable one-stop connections to Brisbane from more than 100 destinations across the United States that currently require at least two stops. American also highlights how Brisbane is “known for sensational coastlines, world-famous zoos, a vibrant cultural scene, and 280 days of sun every year.”

Below you can see the planned combined transpacific network for American and Qantas in the peak winter 2024-2025 season.

American & Qantas transpacific network

American’s premium Boeing 787-9 will fly to Brisbane

There’s a lot that’s exciting about this flight, as this is also the first route that’s confirmed to be operated by American’s new “premium” Boeing 787-9s. New Boeing 787s delivered as of this year will feature all-new interiors, and the planes will be in an ultra-premium configuration.

Specifically, these 787-9s will feature just 244 seats, including 51 business class seats, 32 premium economy seats, 18 extra legroom economy seats, and 143 economy seats. As a point of comparison, American’s current 787-9s feature 285 seats, including 30 business class seats, 21 premium economy seats, 36 extra legroom economy seats, and 198 economy seats.

The interiors on these new jets look like a huge improvement over what American is currently offering. American will debut the Adient Ascent business class product with doors on this aircraft, so that’s super exciting.

American’s new 787-9 business class
American’s new 787-9 premium economy

I suspect American is operating this version of the 787-9 to Brisbane not because it’s going to be American’s most premium route, but rather to avoid having to take a payload restriction when there are strong headwinds, given how long this route is. At 8,300+ miles, this route would be pushing the limits of American’s “standard” 787-9s, which are heavier, due to having more seats.

Since the new 787-9s are lower capacity, they’ll also be lower weight. One of the reasons that Qantas is able to operate such long 787-9 flights is because the carrier’s 787-9s have so few seats.

Bottom line

As of late October 2024, American will launch a new daily seasonal flight between Dallas and Brisbane. At over 8,300 miles, this will be American’s longest route. On top of that, it will be served by a brand new premium configured Boeing 787-9, with new interiors, including a business class suite with doors.

I’m curious to see if American can make this Dallas to Brisbane route work, and if it’ll return in future seasons. We’ve seen United hugely expand in Australia lately, but even United hasn’t succeeded across the board, and has decreased service in a few markets.

What do you make of American’s new Dallas to Brisbane route?

Conversations (39)
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  1. Cliff Guest

    Is there a reason that QF and AA don't have a flight from Chicago?

  2. Jeff Guest

    I'm seeing C = 0 across the board via EF in both directions every day available starting Oct 26, what am I missing?

    1. Jc Guest

      There was plenty of systemwide space when he wrote the article but economy was not on sale. Then once Ben wrote their article and economy seats went on sale all of the upgrade space appears to have been zeroed out.

  3. Mick Guest

    I haven’t checked yet but 450k is often standard for the big flight (ie if you search syd to lax). But the cost comes down significantly often when you add on a domestic leg eg syd lax las or phx.

    1. Mick Guest

      Ok just did a quick check. Still 450k with the domestic leg added :)

  4. TravelinWilly Diamond

    They’ll try it for six months, and if that doesn’t work they’ll introduce a new Miami to Palau route, and if that doesn’t work after six months it will be a new Charlotte to Entebbe route, and if that doesn’t work after six months it will be a new Portland to Glasgow route.

    Never change, American.

  5. CPH-Flyer Gold

    Only 6 seats more than the most dense JAL 787-9 configuration, and 49 seats more than the premium JAL configuration.

  6. EthaninSF Gold

    Didn't Qantas announce a BNE-ORD route before the pandemic (that never actually came to fruition)? I guess this route similarly reduces dependence on connections through SYD (and having to fly further to MEL). As an example, I have a friend who lives in Alice Springs, NT who has family in Pittsburgh, PA. His route is normally ASP-SYD-DFW-PIT. With this new flight, he has another option to connect in BNE, but still requires a double connection.

    1. Robert Guest

      Would a single connection even be possible between ASP and PIT? I think for the foreseeable future, it's always going to be at least a double connection.

  7. Luis Guest

    Still can't believe an AA plane will have an interior that looks that nice.

  8. kimshep Guest

    A couple of additional points to consider:

    1. Why is HNL / Hawaii left off the AA/QF JV map? AA runs a non-stop DFW-HNL service and QF runs SYD-HNL, both of which allow a stop=over opportunity in HNL for those that desire a point to break up what would normally be = for most Americans = a very long flight?

    2. The DFW-(BNE)-SYD QF B747=400 flight is mentioned below, for good reason. Whilst this was...

    A couple of additional points to consider:

    1. Why is HNL / Hawaii left off the AA/QF JV map? AA runs a non-stop DFW-HNL service and QF runs SYD-HNL, both of which allow a stop=over opportunity in HNL for those that desire a point to break up what would normally be = for most Americans = a very long flight?

    2. The DFW-(BNE)-SYD QF B747=400 flight is mentioned below, for good reason. Whilst this was necessitated by prevailing winds on the route and the requirement for a fuel stop (since eliminated by using the QF A380-600 and/or B787=9), both QF and AA learnt some unexpected lessons, courtesy of the B747,

    It became abundantly clear that the BNE (refuel) stop held a number of tangible benefits for travellers from DFW - first, that BNE actually provided a better, faster, more convenient connection point for passengers travelling DFW=(BNE)-SYD and wishing to connect to Australian destinations OTHER than SYD ie: CNS, DRW, ASP, ADL, PER and MEL. BNE allowed such passengers to clear Customs and Immigration in BNE and do a better connect to their final destination, compared to having to do a double-shuffle transfer in SYD from the international to domestic terminals.

    Secondly, it also became evident that BNE was a much more convenient connection point point for those headed to FNQ (Far North Queensland ie: Cairns, Townsville, Cooktown etc) for serious luxury fly-fishing enthusiasts and for those tourists wishing to visit the Great Barrier Reef.

    Whilst these factors have been known for a number of years, I suspect that the recent addition of Doug Parker (former AA CEO) to the QF Board may well have had some influence here, adding a creative solution to QF's current lack of B787=widebody fleet.

    1. flyingsolo Guest

      you talk about SYD having double shuffle transfers but BNE have separate buildings for international and domestic. Thats still a double shuffle to me!

  9. caelus678 Member

    The premium economy seat looks really nice, and it's 2-3-2, I thought AA would go for 2-4-2

    1. Anthony Joseph Guest

      This is NOT domestic "Premium Economy". This is a seat that is comparable to domestic first class seats. So, you are not "glued" to your neighbor's elbow and jostling for amr rest space. Economy extra legroom and Economy are more dense per row.
      However, the Premium Economy fares are at least twice the Economy fare on these international configuration PE.

    2. Nick Guest

      The original 787 economy configuration was 2-4-2, so it's pretty much of impossible to install proper 2-4-2 premium economy seats on a 787.

  10. Tim Dunn Diamond

    Despite the fact that some are triggered to include me and DL in every conversation before I write a word, this route SHOULD work because of the QF JV. Even if the local market is relatively small to BNE compared to SYD and even MEL, QF has enough connecting flights throughout AU to make the flight work and likely better than UA's LAX-BNE seasonal route.

    And it is good to see AA elevating the business...

    Despite the fact that some are triggered to include me and DL in every conversation before I write a word, this route SHOULD work because of the QF JV. Even if the local market is relatively small to BNE compared to SYD and even MEL, QF has enough connecting flights throughout AU to make the flight work and likely better than UA's LAX-BNE seasonal route.

    And it is good to see AA elevating the business class product by adding doors and refreshing their hard product, joining DL as the 2nd US carrier with a business class suite w/ doors. This also makes UA Polaris the least competitive top-end product among US carriers.

    1. JP Guest

      You used to be the most hated user here and now it seems like you're getting a lot of support for some reason. Do you know why? I have no idea - I'd love to know (I'm being serious with no joke or whatever).

    2. Tim Dunn Diamond

      because the notion that I am the most hated is held by a handful of people - most of whom are loyal to AA and UA.
      I've been involved in aviation-related internet chat forums for more than 20 years; I know who I am dealing with.

      I also know that there are people that appreciate what I write and they have said so including on this forum. not every word and every comment but...

      because the notion that I am the most hated is held by a handful of people - most of whom are loyal to AA and UA.
      I've been involved in aviation-related internet chat forums for more than 20 years; I know who I am dealing with.

      I also know that there are people that appreciate what I write and they have said so including on this forum. not every word and every comment but they know I bring insights that other users don't post. THAT is why I keep at it.

      That mysterious support that you can't figure out is actually people that are tired of being unable to read legitimate industry comparisons without a handful of people blowing a door plug and resorting to childish techniques including a revolving number of fake user names to lash back.

      Meanwhile, good for AA to finding a use for some fresh, high capability airplanes.

    3. JP Guest

      I'd agree with you for some points, even as a one who prefers UA over the other US Big Three carriers (only because they're a Star Alliance member).

      Honestly, I'm also sick of those who defend "some companies" just because they like it, even if it's clearly the companies' fault. It only brings the companies they love so much's reputation down and so on.

    4. Lee Guest

      Tim, I find your comments to be reasoned. I also find that most of your detractors offer adolescent comments. Now, regarding this move by AA, I wonder how long it is before Mr. Znotins cancels it? Because of AA's network unreliability, I've moved a good chunk of business away from AA. No emotions. Just business.

    5. Tim Dunn Diamond

      thank you, Lee, and JP above.
      If network unreliability means how long routes last, AA's churn in routes is related to its lack of a consistent strategy and that its core, profitable international network is so small compared to DL and UA.
      I personally am optimistic that DFW-BNE will stick. The question is whether it becomes seasonal, reduced during the summer when the same 2 planes can make two roundtrips to Europe (+/-...

      thank you, Lee, and JP above.
      If network unreliability means how long routes last, AA's churn in routes is related to its lack of a consistent strategy and that its core, profitable international network is so small compared to DL and UA.
      I personally am optimistic that DFW-BNE will stick. The question is whether it becomes seasonal, reduced during the summer when the same 2 planes can make two roundtrips to Europe (+/- a few hours since DFW-Europe roundtrip still exceeds 24 hours for many destinations) or a roundtrip to S. America - which also often requires more than 1 aircraft if the route is a common double redeye.

      A route as part of a JV IS the kind of thing AA should be able to retain. This is a long route so AA/QF will be able to pull some interior US passengers that other carriers cannot.

      It will also be worth seeing what AA does with the remainder of their high J 789s and if they are available to really fill those extra seats or they end up as more gate upgrades or for employees.

    6. yoloswag420 Guest

      Honestly, it's because people realized how deranged his haters were. It's gotten to the point, where they are literally on posts talking about Tim, before Tim even comments. This weird internet obsession with someone you don't know is not normal.

      Sure Tim is very garrulous and might not always be correct or agreeable on every point, but it's extremely odd behavior to care so much about an internet stranger.

    7. Leigh Guest

      Hiya,

      AA has been looking at the route for years, with part of the strong business case also including the catchment areas of the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast. Lots of developments in the works as well in preparation for the 2032 Olympics. Now they have the right aircraft to operate the flight.

      Cheers

  11. Roberto Guest

    According to Tim Dunn, Delta would be more successful if they launched DFW to BNE on their A350-1000. It’s science.

    1. Terence Guest

      You forgot the vital role ICN plays in the network. Everyone goes to Oceania needs to connect via ICN. Who leads there? It's basic science.

    2. Tim Dunn Diamond

      DL did just confirm the configuration of its more premium A350-900s which is being done also to improve range even though DL's newest A359s will be higher MTOW versions that anything DL has.
      The ex-Latam birds should get the new configuration presumably over the next couple years.

      See what happens when someone else drags DL into the conversation before I do?

  12. Antwerp Guest

    The question is whether flight attendants on the new config can still barricade the galley using seatbelts. I’m sure they will find a way so as to avoid service for at least 14-15 hours of it.

    1. NedsKid Diamond

      Antwerp, nah, they'll come with new automated barricades that close after boarding is complete. Kinda like the booth around the driver of a Greyhound.

    2. Crosscourt Guest

      Touche. So true.

    3. Sue Mitchell Guest

      Really!! Get a grip

    4. Anthony Joseph Guest

      Yep....agree. At least make the "old bags" F/A's qualify and be ciritcally reviewed for their stamina and level of service at all hours of the flight.
      Also, prevent them from "hogging" the crew rest bunks from the few junior F/A's. Qatar and Emirates only allow about 4-6 hours crew rest on the 16+ hr long hauls.
      I will never, ever fly US carriers on international flights. Period......

  13. Super Diamond

    Do we foresee Qantas adding any additional First Class capacity to America?

    1. Pete Guest

      No, at least not until the A350-1000 fleet comes online. Qantas is suffering a severe aircraft shortage at the moment, and has had to wet lease an A330 from Finnair to maintain its current timetable. The A380 fleet is already busy running across to LAX and over to LHR, and also to Hong Kong.

      Once the A350's are commissioned the A380s will be retired, reducing the first class cabin from its current 14 seats to...

      No, at least not until the A350-1000 fleet comes online. Qantas is suffering a severe aircraft shortage at the moment, and has had to wet lease an A330 from Finnair to maintain its current timetable. The A380 fleet is already busy running across to LAX and over to LHR, and also to Hong Kong.

      Once the A350's are commissioned the A380s will be retired, reducing the first class cabin from its current 14 seats to a more serene 6, and since it's hard enough to score an award seat in Qantas first now (let alone an upgrade from biz), the future looks bleak for redemptions.

  14. roger Guest

    If AA and Qantas cannot make this route work as a Joint Venture there more than likely is not a market for the segment. Years ago Qantas operated the 747 on DFW-Brisbane so there obviously is some type of demand although it is one very long flight. I wish them well with it.

    1. steve64 Guest

      The Qantas DFW-BNE service was really just a fuel stop for the DFW-SYD flight.
      I do think they were allowed to sell seats just to BNE, but the eastbound SYD-DFW didn't require a fuel stop, so there was no direct BNE-DFW service.
      The westbound BNE stop was removed when the A380 took over the flight.

    2. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      I do think they were allowed to sell seats just to BNE

      Of course they would, seeing as that's an Australian destination, and they're an..... Australian airline. ;)

    3. Mike C Diamond

      If AA were flying DFW-BNE-SYD, they could also sell DFW-BNE and DFW-SYD, both are US-AU routes. The only thing QF could do that AA could not is sell BNE-SYD.

    4. Pete Guest

      They should be able to make it work. There are close to four million people in SE Queensland and northern NSW for whom Brisbane is the main international gateway airport, and there's quite a lot of money about too.

    5. Mike C Diamond

      True, but not the whole story. The stop in BNE was due to a west-bound range limitation on their DFW-SYD flights. The outbound sector was non-stop SYD-DFW. Having flown QF DFW-MEL, I can confirm it is a loong flight.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

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Luis Guest

Still can't believe an AA plane will have an interior that looks that nice.

3
TravelinWilly Diamond

They’ll try it for six months, and if that doesn’t work they’ll introduce a new Miami to Palau route, and if that doesn’t work after six months it will be a new Charlotte to Entebbe route, and if that doesn’t work after six months it will be a new Portland to Glasgow route. Never change, American.

2
kimshep Guest

A couple of additional points to consider: 1. Why is HNL / Hawaii left off the AA/QF JV map? AA runs a non-stop DFW-HNL service and QF runs SYD-HNL, both of which allow a stop=over opportunity in HNL for those that desire a point to break up what would normally be = for most Americans = a very long flight? 2. The DFW-(BNE)-SYD QF B747=400 flight is mentioned below, for good reason. Whilst this was necessitated by prevailing winds on the route and the requirement for a fuel stop (since eliminated by using the QF A380-600 and/or B787=9), both QF and AA learnt some unexpected lessons, courtesy of the B747, It became abundantly clear that the BNE (refuel) stop held a number of tangible benefits for travellers from DFW - first, that BNE actually provided a better, faster, more convenient connection point for passengers travelling DFW=(BNE)-SYD and wishing to connect to Australian destinations OTHER than SYD ie: CNS, DRW, ASP, ADL, PER and MEL. BNE allowed such passengers to clear Customs and Immigration in BNE and do a better connect to their final destination, compared to having to do a double-shuffle transfer in SYD from the international to domestic terminals. Secondly, it also became evident that BNE was a much more convenient connection point point for those headed to FNQ (Far North Queensland ie: Cairns, Townsville, Cooktown etc) for serious luxury fly-fishing enthusiasts and for those tourists wishing to visit the Great Barrier Reef. Whilst these factors have been known for a number of years, I suspect that the recent addition of Doug Parker (former AA CEO) to the QF Board may well have had some influence here, adding a creative solution to QF's current lack of B787=widebody fleet.

2
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