Ritz-Carlton Portland Opening In 2023

Ritz-Carlton Portland Opening In 2023

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In mid-2019 it was announced that a Ritz-Carlton would be opening in Portland, Oregon. The hotel has recently started accepting reservations, so I wanted to take a look at all the details of this property in light of that.

Details of the Ritz-Carlton Portland

The Ritz-Carlton Portland is expected to open in mid-2023, and the hotel is currently accepting reservations for stays as of July 6, 2023. I imagine the timeline has the potential to be changed — I know the goal is to open before July, but further delays are always possible.

This will be the brand’s first property in the Pacific Northwest, and the development is expected to feature 35 floors, with 251 hotel rooms and 138 residential units. The hotel will feature a fitness center, full-service spa, and swimming pool on the 19th floor. Then there will be an indoor/outdoor restaurant and bar on the 20th floor. The property will also feature a club lounge, which Ritz-Carlton properties are known for.

The $600 million development will also feature some office space, retail space, and a ground-level food hall. The property will be located a few blocks from Pioneer Courthouse Square.

Marriott’s Chief Development Officer for North America Full Service Hotels had the following to say about this development back in 2019:

“This landmark project is a game changer for The Ritz-Carlton brand and the City of Portland. The Ritz-Carlton, Portland will set a new standard for luxury hospitality in Portland, expand this iconic brand to the Pacific Northwest and introduce locals to the refined elegance and amenities associated with the Ritz-Carlton Residence lifestyle.”

Below are some renderings of the property.

Ritz-Carlton Portland exterior
Ritz-Carlton Portland guest room
Ritz-Carlton Portland suite
Ritz-Carlton Portland lobby
Ritz-Carlton Portland bar
Ritz-Carlton Portland spa
Ritz-Carlton Portland spa

This will be Portland’s first luxury hotel

When it opens, the Ritz-Carlton is expected to be Portland’s first true five star hotel. What makes this so interesting to me is that Portland is a quirky place, and is fiercely loyal to local businesses. It’s not that other hotels are necessarily “local,” but as a general rule of thumb I can’t imagine many locals are a fan of this development. That’s especially true since the hotel is opening in the space of the Alder Street Food Cart Pod, which has closed.

Then again, I’m guessing on many levels Ritz-Carlton doesn’t really care what locals think, since that’s probably not their target demographic.

I think the below comment from a reader back in 2019 about the statement from a Marriott executive probably sums up a common view point:

“The Ritz-Carlton…will…introduce locals to the refined elegance and amenities associated with the Ritz-Carlton Residence lifestyle.” Word to Ritz Carlton’s marketing team: locals do not need to be “introduced” to “refined elegance.” We know it–we just reject it. Just because we live a more casual lifestyle doesn’t mean we’re country bumpkins. Our many amazing restauranteurs understand the local scene. Chefs like Gabriel Rucker and Vitaly Paley create world-class food served with zero pretense. “Refined elegance” in the form of a white tablecloth/dress code/stuffy maitre’d is NOT what folks are looking for here.

I imagine this hotel will be targeted at high end leisure traffic as well as conferences. In general the Pacific Northwest is highly seasonal when it comes to tourism, and hotel rates reflect that. It’s not uncommon to see rates 3-5x as much in summer as winter.

Ritz-Carlton Portland rates

Now that the Ritz-Carlton Portland is accepting reservations, we have a sense of what pricing will be like, at least initially. For what it’s worth, entry level rooms at the hotel are 459-515 square feet (41-46 square meters), so rooms here will be quite spacious.

For those paying cash, rates seem to start at around $500 per night, which is roughly what I’d expect. Currently there’s not much seasonal rate variation, though that will almost certainly change over time.

Ritz-Carlton Portland cash rates

Club rooms currently cost an extra $200-250 per night compared to a standard room. Obviously that’s quite a bit, though it’s much less of a premium than you’ll pay at many other Ritz-Carlton properties.

If you are going to book a cash stay at any Ritz-Carlton, I’d highly recommend doing so through the Marriott STARS program, so you can receive complimentary breakfast, a $100 property credit, a room upgrade, early check-in and late check-out (subject to availability), and a welcome amenity. The Marriott STARS rate should be equal to whatever the standard flexible rate is when paying cash.

While it should soon be possible to redeem Marriott Bonvoy points at this property, as of now it doesn’t look like points reservations are being accepted. I imagine that will change soon.

Bottom line

The Ritz-Carlton Portland is expected to open in mid-2023, and is now accepting reservations for stays as of July 2023. This should be Portland’s most luxurious hotel when it opens. The hotel will have plenty of amenities, large rooms, and a club lounge. I’m curious if the reality of the hotel reflects the renderings.

Portlanders (and others) — what do you make of this Ritz-Carlton?

Conversations (39)
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  1. PDX local Guest

    My office is located about a block away from this hotel. The construction destroyed the best food cart pod in downtown—a unique one that consisted of 4+ long city blocks so the streets were lively and filled with locals and tourists daily. Those of us who worked and lived nearby really felt the loss. The other local commenters here are so right about downtown Portland today. The homeless situation is out of control; the police...

    My office is located about a block away from this hotel. The construction destroyed the best food cart pod in downtown—a unique one that consisted of 4+ long city blocks so the streets were lively and filled with locals and tourists daily. Those of us who worked and lived nearby really felt the loss. The other local commenters here are so right about downtown Portland today. The homeless situation is out of control; the police shortage means lots of vandalism and few follow up; the local anti-police sentiment means we haven’t managed to fill the dozens (or more) vacancies in the past few years; the new DA doesn’t believe in prosecution “minor” crimes so criminals are having a field day; and many of us are still working remotely so many of the nearby offices feel half empty. Lots of the downtown retail stores shut down during the pandemic and the current sad situation means many storefronts have remained empty as merchants stay away. A Starbucks down the street—the one we used to visit daily—closed last year and has not reopened. The Ritz just seems so out of place in that location at this time. I can’t imagine paying the $$$ to stay there and walking out to stroll the now-sad feeling streets. Portland downtown today feels nothing like the downtown before the Ritz construction started.

  2. Dion Guest

    I live close to this hotel and it will be fabulous and welcomed by most locals. It will fill up fast as it is walking distance to the theaters, cultural district and the Pearl district with fabulous restaurants.

  3. WWJ Guest

    Downtown Portland continues to be “hollowed out” in terms of street level shops / dining / businesses. Property insurers continue to pull out of the area after years of crime / break ins, vandalisim, etc. go on and Portland PD is instructed not to respond. This RC will shutter in 24-36 months once they see what a bad area this is…

  4. Robert D Guest

    I love Portland and while downtown is a dumpster fire at the moment, it will come back. Is it so different from other cities where there’s nobody downtown because everyone in those office towers are now working from home?

  5. AJ Guest

    Portland is unprestigious and trashy. It doesn’t have large concentrations of wealth like San Francisco, Los Angeles, or New York. The hotel will be a haven for people from real cities because the Nines is a dump, but I’m sure the service standards will be far off international standards.

  6. FNT Delta Diamond Guest

    The furniture and decor looks like a nice JW Marriott. Seriously. Who is designing hotels these days? Not a single piece of furniture in the renderings looks luxury.

  7. Ryan Guest

    It’s time for Portland to grow up a little. This could be a great start.

  8. TProphet Member

    It's going to be absolutely hilarious watching this sort of pretentious, arrogant East Coast stuff completely fail with any Pacific Northwest locals. On the other hand, people from out of town who go for this stuff won't be crowding the places that make the Great Northwest special.

    I hope Portland moves a homeless camp right in front of this.

    1. UA-NYC Diamond

      Will be for visiting NBA teams, Nike/Adidas VIPs, etc. Not locals.

      Of course, it's a full service Marriott that doesn't give most Bonvoy benefits, so I hope it fails hard and fast.

    2. FNT Delta Diamond Guest

      The furniture and decor looks like a nice JW Marriott. Seriously. Who is designing hotels these days? Not a single piece of furniture in the renderings looks luxury.

    3. FNT Delta Diamond Guest

      Where are they going to find staff in Portland willing to provide Ritz-Carlton service? Nose piercings and visible tats are generally not acceptable. Maybe pre-covid a Ritz-Carlton in Portland made sense, but who really wants to be downtown Portland these days? The Hi-Lo Hotel, Autograph Collection has the same problem. I stayed there twice in 2019. It was pretty ghetto at night and in the early morning.

    4. bhcompy Member

      But then you have to go to Fort Worth. Portland is worth visiting. Fort Worth, not so much

  9. BenjaminGuttery Diamond

    Come to Fort Worth. Our luxury residence towers are selling like hotcakes. Omni's tower is doing so well, they are building a second one! Deco 969 had to add floors before starting construction due to the interest (16 to 23 floors). And all of the other competition (Sundance, The Tower, etc.) Is 20+ years old.

    1. UA-NYC Guest

      The downside is, you have to live in Texas

    2. MM Guest

      Exactly, useless fat unemployed white trumpers waiving their bibles and guns. They can all jump off a cliff while I stick to legitimate cities with real progress like NYC.

    3. bhcompy Member

      But then you have to go to Fort Worth. Portland is worth visiting. Fort Worth, not so much

  10. Don Guest

    Portland is awful.

    Liberal city eating itself alive.

    Lived here for 16 years. Left to travel the world during covidmania.
    I still have to come here one a quarter.

    Stay away. It's bleak as can be.

    1. Greg Guest

      That's what I was afraid of - a degradation of respect for safety and property.

      Portland has so much potential for visiting - food sources, vistas, walkable - it was decent in the early 2000s early 2010s, though even then on the edge of being inhospitable.

      I hope this property doesn't turn into a lightning rod for those who disrespect property.

  11. Mike Guest

    I have traveled ALOT to Portland since Covid started and ended. Unfortunately I now stay in Vancouver or at the airport hotels. It sucks The Nines and the AC downtown used to be my spot. But with the homeless the crime etc I can't do it: not sure how this hotel can make it unless something changes downtown and those rates are off the charts I never pay over $200

    1. Greg Guest

      That's what I was afraid of - a degradation of respect for safety and property.

      Portland has so much potential for visiting - food sources, vistas, walkable - it was decent in the early 2000s early 2010s, though even then on the edge of being unhospitable.

      I hope this property doesn't turn into a lightning rod for those who disrespect property.

  12. bill Guest

    It's good to see people who have never left their house explaining how terrible downtowns of cities they've never been to are here in the comments.

    1. John Zia Guest

      We live in downtown Portland and I'm afraid these folks are right. I have lived in Portland 14 years and seen a decline unlike anything people can imagine. At times, late night or early a.m. the streets look more like an apocalyptic scene in a movie than a vibrant large city. Our high rise condo is on the 12th floor and we see the river and Mt Hood. We also overlook a large homeless project...

      We live in downtown Portland and I'm afraid these folks are right. I have lived in Portland 14 years and seen a decline unlike anything people can imagine. At times, late night or early a.m. the streets look more like an apocalyptic scene in a movie than a vibrant large city. Our high rise condo is on the 12th floor and we see the river and Mt Hood. We also overlook a large homeless project 1 block away. Streets are littered and not cleaned enough. Police are rarely seen. Businesses are either struggling or moving out. I work for a services company that works with businesses in and around Portland Metro. We've lost 44% of our business since before Covid, and it is NOT coming back...with many clients avoiding a return to the dangerous downtown micro culture. Totally changed in the years I've been here and...we will be moving at some point too, not cause we want to but...security, even in our high security building is struggling to keep things "safe". I'm not sure how the new hotel will handle such a vast decaying landscape...

  13. Bihchaz Guest

    And watch the Chazbros occupy the suites.

  14. dwondermeant Guest

    The public areas scream luxury but the room seems like a new 4 star Marriott just pleasant
    I stayed at the new Ritz Carlton Downtown for 1100.00 dollars a night in NYC and preferred my 4 star property for under 300 dollars a night.Yes it was a decent new guest room.And breakfast was 60 dollars from an absent celebrity chef which sucked.Dry eggs stingy portions and wooden dry bacon
    But I've had better...

    The public areas scream luxury but the room seems like a new 4 star Marriott just pleasant
    I stayed at the new Ritz Carlton Downtown for 1100.00 dollars a night in NYC and preferred my 4 star property for under 300 dollars a night.Yes it was a decent new guest room.And breakfast was 60 dollars from an absent celebrity chef which sucked.Dry eggs stingy portions and wooden dry bacon
    But I've had better hotels for 200 to 300 a night overseas in Europe and North America
    They are the milking the cow with brand name.Ritz in Montreal beautiful Honolulu excellent etc

  15. Derek Guest

    That building is totally out of place in the Portland skyline. It’s also an eye sore from the viewpoint at Pittock Mansion. The reflection from the sun on the windows is blinding in the afternoons.

  16. FNT Delta Diamond Guest

    Do homeless people get a room here?

    1. Max Guest

      Yes, sponsored by your tax dollars.

  17. Motion to Dismiss Gold

    The spa looks nice but the pictures of the rooms/decor looks very blah, like an average Marriott or maybe JW Marriott.

    1. FNT Delta Diamond Guest

      Lately, all of the new or newly renovated Ritz-Carlton properties have had decors that look more like a JW Marriott than anything remotely luxurious. Some of the Four Seasons have this problem too.

  18. Anthony Diamond

    I've never been to Portland - next time I am in the PNW I will stop by a few days. Either this or the Nines. The Nines apparently still does well, so it seems like people will stay at the top hotels when visiting despite all of the issues

  19. AaronP Guest

    Will the City Council require a certain number of rooms be set aside every night for the homeless???

  20. Elijah Guest

    As a former longtime Portlander, it’s really hard to imagine this being successful honestly. Downtown Portland has gotten so rough and depressing in recent years and Pioneer Courthouse Square is basically ground zero for that. I know lots of locals who basically consider it a no-go zone these days. I can’t imagine guests will be very happy paying top dollar to stay in the midst of that.

    1. Alonzo Diamond

      Same could be said for tons of high end hotels in the Bay area, Minneapolis and Philadelphia. Four Seasons and other high end properties in those areas seem to do just fine with bad surrounding areas. You think Marriott didn't do their economic research before breaking ground here? They don't care about perception, they care about making that dinero homie.

    2. Steve Diamond

      Just dont see how this was the best place to build a new development. I would go to every single city including those you listed before portland.

    3. Bobsmith99 Guest

      They are not building for 2023 they are building for the future. There is ample historic data that shows Portland punches above its weight in terms of hospitality- great dining, easy outdoors access.

    4. Jon Guest

      The analysis was done pre-pandemic, before downtown Portland descended into its current dumpster fire. While I am cautiously hopeful that changes to state and local government may incrementally improve conditions in the region in the long-term, I predict bankruptcy of this property in the near future (note that at least four downtown Portland hotels have already declared bankruptcy).

    5. Steve Guest

      Its three properties The Duniway, Dossier and Hiton Portland Downtown unless you know of a fourth. And they are facing foreclosure not bankruptcy with one of them The Dossier saying they have reach a deal with their lender. But the downtown commercial vacancy rate is 26% so yes there is distress in the hospitality and office space sector. Whether the problems are are result of structural changes to the economy such as a lot more...

      Its three properties The Duniway, Dossier and Hiton Portland Downtown unless you know of a fourth. And they are facing foreclosure not bankruptcy with one of them The Dossier saying they have reach a deal with their lender. But the downtown commercial vacancy rate is 26% so yes there is distress in the hospitality and office space sector. Whether the problems are are result of structural changes to the economy such as a lot more people working from home or in the case of hotels self inflicted in that they have substantially increased their rates during a time they are experiencing increased competition from alternatives such as Airbnb is up for dispute.

    6. Gary Guest

      While your main point is great, Ritz Carlton has absolutely zero to do with anything financial about the property. It’s developed by a private company (I’m an investor) and they’re just the brand name selected for the building. The economic analysis is done by the real estate developer.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.

bill Guest

It's good to see people who have never left their house explaining how terrible downtowns of cities they've never been to are here in the comments.

3
Derek Guest

That building is totally out of place in the Portland skyline. It’s also an eye sore from the viewpoint at Pittock Mansion. The reflection from the sun on the windows is blinding in the afternoons.

2
Steve Diamond

Just dont see how this was the best place to build a new development. I would go to every single city including those you listed before portland.

2
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