Amex Centurion Lounges Coming To Australia

Amex Centurion Lounges Coming To Australia

17

Details remain limited as of now, but it looks like American Express will soon have a couple of its popular Centurion Lounges in Australia.

Amex lounges in Australia getting upgraded

American Express operates two airport lounges in Australia, in Melbourne (MEL) and Sydney (SYD). While American Express is known for its Centurion Lounges, the Australia lounges haven’t historically been named that. Rather they’ve just been known as American Express Lounges, as is the case with several of Amex’s lounges abroad. This reflects that they don’t offer the same amenities you’d find at Centurion Lounges.

American Express Lounge Melbourne entrance

That will soon be changing. Executive Traveller reports that the Amex Lounges in Melbourne and Sydney will be rebranded as Centurion Lounges when they reopen in the coming months (they’ve been closed since the start of the pandemic, given the lack of travel demand). The lounges will be “enhanced,” though as of now there aren’t many details on what that will look like.

American Express Lounge Melbourne seating

These would be the third and fourth Centurion Lounges outside of the United States, after the Centurion Lounge Hong Kong (HKG), as well as the new Centurion Lounge London Heathrow (LHR).

Centurion Lounge Hong Kong 34
Amex Centurion Lounge Hong Kong bar area

How will Amex’s Australia lounges change?

While we have no details as of yet, what has historically set Centurion Lounges apart from other airport lounges is the selection of hot food, and wider selection of alcoholic drinks, including cocktails.

Historically Amex Lounges in Australia haven’t had particularly impressive food and drink selection, perhaps aside from the barista made coffees (which I’d love to see at Centurion Lounges in the United States, by the way). They’ve been more in line with what you’d typically find in a Priority Pass Lounge, rather than what you’d expect from a premium lounge. I would guess that the major difference we’ll see is a significantly improved food & drink selection.

American Express Lounge Melbourne food selection

As far as the sizes go, the Amex Lounge Melbourne is around 2,800 square feet, so it’s on the small side. Meanwhile the Amex Lounge Sydney is 6,500 square feet. Fortunately there shouldn’t be any changes to entry requirements, as Amex Platinum cardmembers get access to Centurion Lounges.

Bottom line

The existing American Express Lounges in Melbourne and Sydney will be rebranded as Centurion Lounges once they reopen in the coming months. While details are limited as of now, I’d expect that we’ll see a significantly improved food & drink selection, which will be a treat for travelers.

What do you make of the new Amex Centurion Lounges coming to Australia?

Conversations (17)
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  1. AK

    EZE's lounge is branded as a Centurion lounge

  2. Jamie

    I love a lounge but the Amex AU lounges are without a doubt the smallest and dirtiest lounges I have ever been too. Think a 2 star all inclusive hotel and you will get my meaning. Any upgrade can only be better.

  3. Leigh

    When I can travel for work again to AU, I look forward to seeing how the AU Centurion Lounges in MEL and SYD compare to the fantastic Qantas First lounges (except for the carpet design, which kind of gives me a headache).

    Random thoughts:

    The domestic Qantas Club Business lounge-within-a-lounge for top tier flyers in Brisbane is also stellar (oddly, much better than the International terminal sister lounge), and blows away the supposedly comparable...

    When I can travel for work again to AU, I look forward to seeing how the AU Centurion Lounges in MEL and SYD compare to the fantastic Qantas First lounges (except for the carpet design, which kind of gives me a headache).

    Random thoughts:

    The domestic Qantas Club Business lounge-within-a-lounge for top tier flyers in Brisbane is also stellar (oddly, much better than the International terminal sister lounge), and blows away the supposedly comparable Qantas Club product in MEL and SYD by a million miles. Same in Perth which was enhanced to serve the PER/AU-LHR clientele; it’s gorgeous and decadent, even without tarmac views.

    I don’t think I’ve been to any Centurion Lounge that could beat any of the above Qantas lounges…though of course not everyone flies QF or has the oneworld status to access those lounges.

    Look forward to getting back to Oz! And I’ll need to start arriving earlier at the MEL and SYD international terminals to sample the two lounge experiences.

  4. Andrew

    Can’t open the LAX Centurion lounge because we just want $695 with no benefits, but a lounge for a country that has closed international travel entirely for nearly 2 years? All over it!

    1. Mike C

      Seems like the perfect time to do renovations. As to LAX, I'm all set for lounge access with OW Emerald Status (QF). I had not been aware that access to the LAX Centurion Lounge was the only benefit US Platinum Card holders received. Thanks for that piece of information.

    2. Leigh

      The LAX international terminal QF/oneworld First lounge is elegant but sterile in design. The AA Flagship lounge is better in my opinion, with great tarmac views (no views from the QF First lounge) Though it’s in the adjacent terminal 4, it’s an easy walk to the main international terminal for departures. The new satellite international gates are quite a long walk, however, but QF and oneworld (and the occasional AA) flights depart from the main...

      The LAX international terminal QF/oneworld First lounge is elegant but sterile in design. The AA Flagship lounge is better in my opinion, with great tarmac views (no views from the QF First lounge) Though it’s in the adjacent terminal 4, it’s an easy walk to the main international terminal for departures. The new satellite international gates are quite a long walk, however, but QF and oneworld (and the occasional AA) flights depart from the main international building. You can access the AA Flagship lounge as an Emerald if flying international or US transcon to NYC JFK.

      If an overseas based Emerald, you also now use the Alaska lounge at Terminal 6, also airside, but I’ve not been to it, so no opinion.

      There are other LAX lounges you can enter with the Amex Platinum card (such as the Delta lounge at terminal 2), but as you’re oneworld Emerald you’ll likely never use them.

    3. Mike C

      @Leigh, my comments were tongue in cheek. I know my lounge access is OW dependent, and post covid I'll be looking more closely at fare cost rather than alliance links. Hopefully Amex will give me lounge access above what airline status does.

    4. Andrew

      The AA flagship is still closed at LAX. I guess they opened a few on the east coast last week. Check the official page - "temporarily closed"

    5. Andrew

      I agree it would be a good time to do renovations, but:
      1. They just built it in 2019. How much needs renovation and
      2. They aren't actually doing anything there. I'm in the building frequently for travel at all hours of the day; no work is being done.

      I can't tell if you're serious about the other point: there are no priority pass lounges in LAX, restaurants are excluded on PP for...

      I agree it would be a good time to do renovations, but:
      1. They just built it in 2019. How much needs renovation and
      2. They aren't actually doing anything there. I'm in the building frequently for travel at all hours of the day; no work is being done.

      I can't tell if you're serious about the other point: there are no priority pass lounges in LAX, restaurants are excluded on PP for Amex cards, and I don't fly Delta, so the airport indeed has no benefits. At least for me.

      YMMV as an Emerald, but the OneWorld business/first lounges are closed in the international terminal. Hopefully you dig the AA lounge.

  5. Todd

    The lounges haven’t been closed due to a lack of travel demand. They have been closed due to the Australian federal government’s overseas travel ban.

  6. Aaron

    I would think the LHR Centurion lounge would open before these two lounges. And from what I'm hearing, the LHR Centurion is more or less ready to go, but only remaining closed due to reduced passenger capacity. So I would actually call these the 3rd and 4th lounges to open outside of the US.

    1. Andrew

      Reduced capacity my butt. I spent 7 hours in LHR a few weeks ago (missed a connection) and T5 was packed the whole time.

      Amex is being cheap. Go to the SFO Amex lounge and you’ll see the zoo of travel is back.

  7. JohnJohn

    Frankly anything they do to either lounge at SYD or MEL would be an improvement. Both have been underwhelming since they opened.

  8. Quinn

    There's also an American Express lounge at GRU but when we were there in January 2020 it was overcrowded and underwhelming.

  9. Sammy

    Hmmm...wasnt the SYD location originally called "Centurion Lounge" when it opened? I remember being rejected around 2010 since I didnt have a Centurion Amex card ;)

  10. Mak

    At last we've found a Centurion Lounge that's unlikely to be full.

    1. Gerard

      Actually, I visited the SYD lounge a few years back and was put on a waitlist even though its not that great. I ended up just using Priority Pass at some of the airport restaurants instead.

Featured Comments Load all 17 comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.

Leigh

The LAX international terminal QF/oneworld First lounge is elegant but sterile in design. The AA Flagship lounge is better in my opinion, with great tarmac views (no views from the QF First lounge) Though it’s in the adjacent terminal 4, it’s an easy walk to the main international terminal for departures. The new satellite international gates are quite a long walk, however, but QF and oneworld (and the occasional AA) flights depart from the main international building. You can access the AA Flagship lounge as an Emerald if flying international or US transcon to NYC JFK. If an overseas based Emerald, you also now use the Alaska lounge at Terminal 6, also airside, but I’ve not been to it, so no opinion. There are other LAX lounges you can enter with the Amex Platinum card (such as the Delta lounge at terminal 2), but as you’re oneworld Emerald you’ll likely never use them.

Leigh

When I can travel for work again to AU, I look forward to seeing how the AU Centurion Lounges in MEL and SYD compare to the fantastic Qantas First lounges (except for the carpet design, which kind of gives me a headache). Random thoughts: The domestic Qantas Club Business lounge-within-a-lounge for top tier flyers in Brisbane is also stellar (oddly, much better than the International terminal sister lounge), and blows away the supposedly comparable Qantas Club product in MEL and SYD by a million miles. Same in Perth which was enhanced to serve the PER/AU-LHR clientele; it’s gorgeous and decadent, even without tarmac views. I don’t think I’ve been to any Centurion Lounge that could beat any of the above Qantas lounges…though of course not everyone flies QF or has the oneworld status to access those lounges. Look forward to getting back to Oz! And I’ll need to start arriving earlier at the MEL and SYD international terminals to sample the two lounge experiences.

Andrew

The AA flagship is still closed at LAX. I guess they opened a few on the east coast last week. Check the official page - "temporarily closed"

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