Major Changes To Alaska Lounge Day Passes

Major Changes To Alaska Lounge Day Passes

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For those looking to access Alaska Lounges, some major changes have been made to the Seattle-based carrier’s day pass offering.

What has changed about Alaska Lounge day passes

Historically Alaska Airlines has sold lounge day passes for $50, which were valid at all locations for a period of 24 hours. As of Monday, June 13, 2022, Alaska Airlines has made major changes to this feature:

  • The cost of a day pass has been increased from $50 to $60
  • Day passes can only be purchased for visits in Los Angeles (LAX), New York (JFK), and San Francisco (SFO); day passes are no longer valid in Anchorage (ANC), Portland (PDX), or Seattle (SEA)
  • Day passes are now only valid at the location at which they were purchased, so you can’t use them to visit multiple lounges anymore

Note that these new restrictions don’t apply to:

  • Day passes sold or distributed before June 13, 2022
  • Future use or additional guest day passes for lounge members
  • Day passes for active duty military
  • Alaska Mileage Plan MVP Gold 75K passes

As it’s described, this change is being made “to maintain space for lounge members and other guests.”

The Alaska Lounge Seattle is expanding

Are these lounge access changes a big deal?

Airport lounge crowding has become a pretty big issue across the board. Alaska Airlines in particular has been having issues with this, and the carrier is working on expanding its lounge footprint in both Portland and Seattle.

With Alaska and American partnering so closely, I imagine the number of American Admirals Club members accessing Alaska Lounges has also increased considerably in the past year or so.

If you’re going to try to work on reducing lounge crowding, restricting the sale of lounge day passes is a good place to start. Now, I should note that one major perk of Alaska Airlines co-branded credit cards is 50% off lounge day passes. Not only has the cost of access gone up from $25 to $30, but this will also no longer be available in Anchorage, Portland, and Seattle.

I imagine many cardmembers won’t be happy about that, given that buying lounge access for $25 was potentially quite a good deal — that’s less than the cost of two drinks at many airports.

Day passes are still available at the Alaska Lounge San Francisco

Bottom line

Alaska Lounge day passes are much more restrictive than before. The price has been increased by 20% (from $50 to $60), day passes are now only valid at one location, and day passes can no longer be used in Anchorage, Portland, or Seattle.

I would imagine that those who saw value in purchasing these passes won’t be happy about this development, while members and others who have lounge access will appreciate that this reduces crowding somewhat.

What do you make of these Alaska Lounge day pass changes?

Conversations (34)
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  1. Shamaree Fortune Guest

    I have been an Alaska card member for years and will be looking for
    Another credit card.

  2. Carol Allen Guest

    Not happy with new policy. I'm doing a major trip from Maui to Seattle then on to Boston and back through Seattle and Maui. Now I won't be able to use day passes. You don't have a happy customer. Will have to rethink my Alaska credit card and travel on Alaska.

  3. Donna Smith Guest

    First they stopped the Priority Pass that comes with credit cards such as Chase Sapphire, now this. Makes me wonder if the $75 annual fee is worth the trouble! Too top it off airline prices have skyrocketed in the last few months. I'm very disappointed.

  4. kevin levine Guest

    Bold move. In a struggling economy business relationships are important. I have accessed these lounges in Seattle and Anchorage for awhile now and as an MVP Gold member for 6 years in a row it makes me lose my sense of loyalty for Alaska Airlines. Makes me think I should stop always booking Alaska despite better prices or times on other airlines. Relationships go both ways.

    1. Linda Guest

      Quite sad that the airline has cut those of us in Alaska from using a day pass here. I used to think that Alaska Airlines was considerate if it's Alaska customers given that generally, we pay more to fly. Not anymore!

  5. Berg R Sanguinetti Guest

    It seems those of us who have been faithful Alaska Airlines card holders don’t mean didly squat to the airlines anymore!!!! Might be time to get a new card ‍♂️

  6. jnrfalcon Guest

    I was arguing whether to keep AA Executive card. And I decided to keep it. Well, now there's more reasons...

    1. Alex Guest

      Exactly. Pay the $450/year for the Citibank Executive Card and you have access to all the Admirals Club and Alaska Lounges with zero problems.

  7. Joelle Erickson Guest

    Something missing from this article is how often Alaska has previously cut off day pass sales at lounges in SEA. Seattle has three Alaska lounges, and it has been commonplace for two or more of them to suspend day pass sales during busy times of day... which at the N Gates location was approx. 70% of their opening hours. It made using Day Passes nearly impossible unless you showed up at 5 a.m. when the...

    Something missing from this article is how often Alaska has previously cut off day pass sales at lounges in SEA. Seattle has three Alaska lounges, and it has been commonplace for two or more of them to suspend day pass sales during busy times of day... which at the N Gates location was approx. 70% of their opening hours. It made using Day Passes nearly impossible unless you showed up at 5 a.m. when the lounge opened. So this change appears to be making that policy more extensive.

  8. Phil Guest

    Great way to continue to discourage loyal credit card holders and drive business to Delta and other service oriented airlines. This will definitely impact my thoughts moving forward, especially for business travel...

    1. David Guest

      Really? Delta? Over lounge passes? Have you looked at how many miles you get at Delta vs. Alaska?? How about Delta continually devaluing the Sky Pecos? And, you think Delta has better customer service than AS? As a former Delta Diamond, enjoy your journey!

  9. E Money Guest

    FYI, I had flown on Alaska in May out of LAX and bought a day pass and they charged me $60. The agent said that same pass would be $30 if I had the Alaska Air Credit card.

    1. Rick Guest

      That is correct. And you don't even need to be flying Alaska to buy a $30 day pass at LAX if you have the card.

  10. MikeyInOregon Guest

    My base is PDX so I'm not happy about it. One of the main reasons why I hold the co-branded credit card is because of the 50% lounge pass discount. Time to consider another credit card with lounge access in PDX.

  11. Darren C Gold

    Alaska Gold 75K member here. I did not renew my Boardroom (Alaska Lounge) membership this year and I will not renew my Bank of America Alaska Airlines card.

    Dropping Priority Pass access from AS lounges in LAX, SEA, etc. was a great idea, but changing the day pass rules for credit card holders is not.

  12. Larry McLaughlin Guest

    My wife and I use Seattle's lounges on our yearly trip to. Hawaii. We have Alaska credit cards, fly, almost exclusively Alaskan Air. The connection wait times for us as sometimes up to 6 hours. Not being able to access these is a big loss to us.

  13. GlennD Guest

    I get that lounges are crowded, but this was advertised as a perk for those with Alaska’s co-branded credit card (like me). No doubt they are covered by their “fine print”, but they’ve just encouraged me to switch more of my business to Delta. Delta has some beautiful new lounges at SEA, and I can actually use them.

    1. Rich Golby Guest

      I don't fly enough to warrant purchasing the Alaska Lounge membership. I fly Alaska because they have nonstops to where I want to go and I always upgrade to premium seats. I've only purchased Day Passes a couple of times and definitely got the impression from the desk and lounge staff that I wasn't welcome. Now that I know that for sure, I'll use Alaska Airlines for what it is. A ride to where I want to go and thats it.

  14. George Romey Guest

    Their lounges at SEA and ANC aren't all that big to begin with, particularly ANC.

    1. EthaninSF Member

      PDX is pretty small as well - even after its renovation.

  15. Peterson Guest

    Interesting change, I don't think joining One World Allaince has done anything good for Alaska Airlines loyal customers so far.
    I do enjoy using the lounges, and I like sharing it with my family. I think members should still be able to buy the passes. But credit card holders & other pass holders should be restricted. After all members are their best advertisers to increasing profitable memberships.

  16. derek Guest

    I used to be a snob, liking the lounges. Now, I relax in an unused gate area and watch the planes from there. When airlines enhance things so much, I become a cheapskate as a result.

    1. Jimmy Guest

      2021 really was the golden age of travel. I was vaxxed, could get $150 roundtrip tickets from little MFR to just about anywhere Alaska flew, got access to the SEA Alaska Lounges with my Priority Pass card, and nearly always got upgraded on the flights.

      Now, back to reality...

    2. Dan Guest

      Cancelling my Alaska card today. How about expanding your lounges vs. taking away benefits of your " incredible" credit card.

    3. Sam Guest

      Totally. Was same on DL & AS from SEA. Fun while it lasted!

  17. zagman1112 New Member

    Good! I would be in favor of eliminating day passes altogether. There is not enough room for people purchasing day passes. I have an Alaska Lounge membership for my family since we fly Alaska through SEA pretty much any time we travel domestically. The only lounge we can ever really find much space is at the N Gates and that is because that lounge is huge. All the other ones are always packed. I am all in favor of adding restrictions.

  18. Dorothy Halfhill Guest

    ALASKA AIRLINES IS DANGEROUSLY CLOSE TO LOSING ITS DECADES LONG REPUTATION OF BEING THE MOST CUSTOMER FRIENDLY AIRLINES IN THE UNITED STATES. I AM PROFOUNDLY SADDENED. I HAVE ALWAYS BRAGGED ON ALASKA AIR TO ANYONE WHO WOULD LISTEN. ARE YOU GUYS SELLING OUT?

    1. Steve from LA Member

      Going, going, gone. I'm seriously considering moving my status to British Airways.

    2. SwimBikeFly Guest

      Trust me when I tell you that they won’t miss you.

    3. Mike Guest

      That makes no sense at all. If you indeed have status with Alaska, you should be pleased that less people will now be getting to the lounges.

  19. Mike Guest

    Good on you Alaska. With a few exceptions, lounges have become the most crowded, noisiest and least pleasant place at an airport. I am not familiar with the economies of the credit card industry, I assume in some way all those card perks make financial sense, but they completely erode the value proposition of lounges, top tier hotel memberships etc.

    1. Creditcrunch Diamond

      I couldn’t agree with your observations more, a shift towards high end airside restaurants seems to me a better choice than a packed lounge with poor food and drink options.

    2. 305 Guest

      I’ll third this sentiment! Some of the behavior I witnessed at the DCA admirals club on Sunday was appalling to say the least, and more akin what one expects to see in the terminal. Throw in dated US Airways decor, overcrowded with guests, and Miller Lite as the only free beer: I’d be better off in the terminal.

      Centurion Lounges solve two of those problems, but the crowds are even worse. Thank god for...

      I’ll third this sentiment! Some of the behavior I witnessed at the DCA admirals club on Sunday was appalling to say the least, and more akin what one expects to see in the terminal. Throw in dated US Airways decor, overcrowded with guests, and Miller Lite as the only free beer: I’d be better off in the terminal.

      Centurion Lounges solve two of those problems, but the crowds are even worse. Thank god for the Royal Air Maroc status match, the Miami Centurion is always a zoo while Flagship is empty

    3. G Koester (1375360) Guest

      As a loyal Alaska Airlines fre1uent flier for almost 50 years -- I became a million miler two years ago -- and holder (with my wife) of two Alaska Airlines Visa cards, this strikes me as a punch in the gut. I'm 78 years old and don't fly nearly as much as I used to, but getting a day pass to the lounge at SEA was always a pleasant way to pass time between flights....

      As a loyal Alaska Airlines fre1uent flier for almost 50 years -- I became a million miler two years ago -- and holder (with my wife) of two Alaska Airlines Visa cards, this strikes me as a punch in the gut. I'm 78 years old and don't fly nearly as much as I used to, but getting a day pass to the lounge at SEA was always a pleasant way to pass time between flights. It seems my loyalty to Alaska Airlines
      means nothing to some corporate suit who cares only about profits. Thanks for punching me in the gut, Alaska.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.

Rich Golby Guest

I don't fly enough to warrant purchasing the Alaska Lounge membership. I fly Alaska because they have nonstops to where I want to go and I always upgrade to premium seats. I've only purchased Day Passes a couple of times and definitely got the impression from the desk and lounge staff that I wasn't welcome. Now that I know that for sure, I'll use Alaska Airlines for what it is. A ride to where I want to go and thats it.

1
SwimBikeFly Guest

Trust me when I tell you that they won’t miss you.

1
Steve from LA Member

Going, going, gone. I'm seriously considering moving my status to British Airways.

1
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