Air Canada Revokes Ridiculously Entitled Person’s Employee Travel Privileges

Air Canada Revokes Ridiculously Entitled Person’s Employee Travel Privileges

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One of the awesome benefits of working in the airline industry is that you get travel privileges. However, some people don’t seem to get that this comes with certain expectations related to conduct and how to behave.

Why Air Canada revoked employee’s travel perks

Some people don’t seem to know when to stop. The daughter of an Air Canada employee is complaining to the media after her mother’s employee travel privileges with the airline were suspended.

The woman claims that she filed a complaint with the airline after receiving what she deemed to be poor customer service by ground staff while traveling with her mother’s employee travel privileges. The woman not only emailed senior officials at the airline, but also copied media outlets. The woman also allegedly misrepresented herself as a revenue customer, rather than someone traveling on employee privileges.

Both the 62-year-old Air Canada employee (who is an administrator) and her daughter have had their travel privileges with the airline suspended for a period of two years due to this incident. The woman claims that the travel privileges are one of the main reasons her mother worked for Air Canada, and she’s worried that her mother might lose her job if the situation escalates.

Now the woman is going to the media again to complain about the treatment she and her mother received, with having their privileges suspended:

“I had a really like sickening feeling when my mother told me what they did to her. It’s one thing for me to be reprimanded, but it’s totally different for my actions impacting my mom.”

The employee allegedly went to the union to try to protest this decision, but the union stated there was nothing that could be done, and suggested she apologize to the airline to reduce her penalty.

An Air Canada spokesperson issued the following statement regarding this situation:

“We deal with our employees directly on internal matters. However, we can confirm employee travel is a special privilege and a unique and generous perk of working for an airline that comes with responsibilities which the overwhelming majority of employees and families understand and value.

“We take feedback about our services seriously. In fact, we undertook an investigation into the complaint lodged, and subsequently found facts which did not align with what was presented.”

Air Canada suspended an employee’s travel privileges

This is RIDICULOUS

We obviously don’t know the substance of the complaint that was filed with Air Canada. However, no matter how you slice it, the daughter of the employee crossed the line, and keeps digging herself (and her mother) a deeper hole:

  • When you take advantage of employee travel perks, you have to agree to certain terms and codes of conduct
  • Even if she had a legitimate complaint, you can’t misrepresent yourself as a paying customer, and you shouldn’t try to get media involved in trying to solve an internal issue
  • She’s outraged that her mom is being reprimanded for her actions; that’s how it works when you take advantage of employee travel privileges
  • Even the union made it clear that nothing could be done to defend the employee, and that she should just apologize
  • Even after all this happened, the woman is still trying to go to the media to complain about the outcome of this, claiming she fears her mother could now lose her job (which very well could happen if she keeps this up)

The level of entitlement here is kind of mind-boggling. Unfortunately this isn’t the first time we’ve seen someone traveling with non-rev perks act this way, and it’s also why some airline employees are hesitant to extend travel privileges to friends & family, since they fear this kind of behavior.

This behavior is literally the definition of looking a gift horse in the mouth…

This traveler doesn’t seem to understand what a privilege is

Bottom line

While airline employee travel privileges are awesome, they come with certain behavior expectations. I think the daughter of this Air Canada employee is the perfect example of how not to act when you’re traveling with airline benefits.

The fact that this person is still trying to go to the media to essentially mediate is a very odd approach to take, if you ask me… I don’t see this ending well for her or her mother.

What do you make of this Air Canada situation?

Conversations (131)
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  1. Elmorito Guest

    Receiving poor treatment while flying on Air Canada is nothing new actually...

  2. linda P Guest

    I worked for Delta for 30 years, and I was very careful to whom I allowed to travel on my pass benefits. I got to the point that i just stopped giving buddy passes to relatives as it was always a hassle, they call you from S. Africa when they are bumped and it is too much work.
    Can't the mother rein her ungrateful little brat daughter in? If it was up to me, I would revoke their travel privileges indefinitely.

  3. K Mill Guest

    Oh gosh! Even if you have a challenging experience with the airline you say thank you and you can either address it has « I wish to help, and here is my experience… » or keep it and let a paying member say something! I did had a challenging experience with an airline that may or may not be this one… and I breathe through it said thank you, I was frustrated but I was using perks...

    Oh gosh! Even if you have a challenging experience with the airline you say thank you and you can either address it has « I wish to help, and here is my experience… » or keep it and let a paying member say something! I did had a challenging experience with an airline that may or may not be this one… and I breathe through it said thank you, I was frustrated but I was using perks and I was grateful to have a seat for virtually almost nothing… it’s important to learn emotion management when we use those perks in order to keep them! And also, keeping in mind that many airlines has been under insane amount of overtime due to reopening and closing and uncertainty, people are stressed and tired! Some compassion towards ground people is always a better approach :-) I hope this inspires others!

  4. Lou F Guest

    I believe Air Canada is among the least complained about airlines due to the fact that they make it impossible to complain. Yes, the daughter was in the wrong but with how this story is written it makes me believe the author is on the AC payroll. As a paying customer if have had several issues with AC. The ones I have tried to complain about led me nowhere.

    AC is a great airline...

    I believe Air Canada is among the least complained about airlines due to the fact that they make it impossible to complain. Yes, the daughter was in the wrong but with how this story is written it makes me believe the author is on the AC payroll. As a paying customer if have had several issues with AC. The ones I have tried to complain about led me nowhere.

    AC is a great airline but the entitlement goes both ways. Their staff expect you to accept everything with a smile and when you don't its never their fault. They have lost their sense of customer service years ago...

  5. Ben Lucas Guest

    While what she did and continues to is detrimental to her situation, the fundamental point should not be lost.

    As a frequent flier (for business without other options). air Canada's service is the by far some of the worst I have experienced world wide. Their customer service generally is nothing beyond shocking. To be ignored, scowled and snapped at as a customer is not the exception, it is the norm. Air Canada's service is a...

    While what she did and continues to is detrimental to her situation, the fundamental point should not be lost.

    As a frequent flier (for business without other options). air Canada's service is the by far some of the worst I have experienced world wide. Their customer service generally is nothing beyond shocking. To be ignored, scowled and snapped at as a customer is not the exception, it is the norm. Air Canada's service is a case study of the outcome of a government supported monopoly. They should be scrubbed from the playing field.

    1. Arlene Guest

      Ben, if you, as a revenue passenger, have a complaint, go ahead and file it.

      Anyone, I repeat, anyone, flying on AC employee benefits knows, or should know the rules. I say this as a kid of a 45 year AC employee who has flown on a pass all my life.

      The daughter is an idiot. She's going to get her mother fired. And rightly so.

    2. Ben Lucas Guest

      Well thank you for giving me permission Arlene. Kinda missed my point didn't you?

    3. John C Guest

      Big Ben, obviously you’ve never been employed by the airlines and received pass benefits. It’s drilled into you from day 1 that this is a privilege not a right. Daughter seems to think she’s entitled. Oh well, lesson learned. No both daughter and mother can pay full fare for their stupidity.

    4. Ben Lucas Guest

      I am an Airline pilot ATPL TC, FAA and EASA with 32 years flight experience Little John. I don't know what you are arguing about. No where did I say she was right. I was pointing out the abysmal level of Air Canada's service. And your point is?

  6. Henry Guest

    I wonder if this one is related. (Pure speculation) https://toronto.citynews.ca/2022/07/06/air-canada-nut-allergy-policy/

  7. Madeleine St.Leger Guest

    I am totally agree with the Airline's rules because people nowadays have lost their respects and common senses. Thanks

  8. Aircanadasucks Guest

    All passes holders still pay some fees and it is not free this no misrepresentation is possible. This article is misinformation and industry propaganda

    1. Arlene Guest

      Your handle says it all.

      If you take the employee benefits, you play by the rules. The rules are very clear.

      Unbelievable this daughter went to the media.

    2. Martinbert Guest

      You lose all integrity right from the get go with your user name . Your point is non receivable and useless

  9. Scott Guest

    Karen ...karen...you had a free ride ,but still find yourself a way to mess it up..

  10. Al Guest

    Travel privilege is neither a right nor mandated as part of employees' pay and can be revoked at Air Canada's discretion, because of that union cannot interfere in anyway.

  11. Not Important Guest

    Look, what was it really, was it that she wasn't treated with kid gloves or was she really mistreated by an employee. Either way, your on the same team - handle the problem then and there and move on. What does this young woman expect to get from this ... a free ticket? Oh wait, she already got that.

    Most companies that used to give family discounts/perks have now limited that to the employee...

    Look, what was it really, was it that she wasn't treated with kid gloves or was she really mistreated by an employee. Either way, your on the same team - handle the problem then and there and move on. What does this young woman expect to get from this ... a free ticket? Oh wait, she already got that.

    Most companies that used to give family discounts/perks have now limited that to the employee only. Before that happens, or the perk is done away with all together ... handle it discretely. This is not news and I for one am sick of hearing about everyone's poor little toes being stepped on.

  12. Aviaton_Fan Guest

    Right from the AC employee travel policy:

    Unacceptable behaviour:

    Challenging personnel who are handling operational requirements

    I was also told by my Dad when flying non-rev on AC what the dress code was, what the expectations for conduct were, etc., as well as the consequences for failing to follow this.

    This girl is out to lunch, and the fact that her mom didn't reinforce this to her makes her almost as guilty. They deserve to...

    Right from the AC employee travel policy:

    Unacceptable behaviour:

    Challenging personnel who are handling operational requirements

    I was also told by my Dad when flying non-rev on AC what the dress code was, what the expectations for conduct were, etc., as well as the consequences for failing to follow this.

    This girl is out to lunch, and the fact that her mom didn't reinforce this to her makes her almost as guilty. They deserve to lose the travel priveleges. It's not a right, its a privelege.

    1. Arlene Guest

      Spot on.

      I'm the kid of a 45 year employee.

      Never in a million years would I ever consider for a millisecond behaving as this person did.

  13. Lawrence Guest

    I am an airline employee based out of the US. Over here, we’re generally told that we deserve the same courtesy and service that a revenue passenger would receive since we are literally supporting the airlines with our skills or labor. Should a problem arise, however, we’re told to handle it professionally by going through the chain of command. Bringing the media into the mix will almost absolutely result in reprimands.

    We are also...

    I am an airline employee based out of the US. Over here, we’re generally told that we deserve the same courtesy and service that a revenue passenger would receive since we are literally supporting the airlines with our skills or labor. Should a problem arise, however, we’re told to handle it professionally by going through the chain of command. Bringing the media into the mix will almost absolutely result in reprimands.

    We are also very highly informed that once you extend your travel privileges to anyone else: they’re to conduct themselves in as professional a manner as possible or else your privileges and even your job are at risk.

    I’m smart enough to know that if I were to get bad service I’d fire off an email or talk to an agent at another station and just take my seat.

    The one thing that’s so very climatic about non revving is the very fact that a revenue passenger or someone more senior to you as a fellow pass rider can bump you last minute!!! That’s why I remain grateful for getting ANY seat assignment. Up to a limit: as long as I get on the plane, everything else can be settled after.

  14. D3kingg Guest

    Non rev travel is irrelevant no airline executive would waste a minute of their time with it. They could care less if seats go out empty or an airline employee occupies them for free. It impacts the bottom line in no way.

  15. CommonSense Guest

    Well, for everyone on the whole travel privledged are a privledged, I bet you would take a very very different tune of your company took away your health benefits because your kid kicked the doctor. Those travel benefits are part of the employees compensation. I could totally see the airline saying that the daughter could no longer fly free....but anything beyond that should be a breach of contract on the airline's part plain and simple....

    Well, for everyone on the whole travel privledged are a privledged, I bet you would take a very very different tune of your company took away your health benefits because your kid kicked the doctor. Those travel benefits are part of the employees compensation. I could totally see the airline saying that the daughter could no longer fly free....but anything beyond that should be a breach of contract on the airline's part plain and simple. Unfortunately in this day and age, real contract law, worker and consumer protections do not exist and a contract is only binding on the part of the employee/consumer and the business can do whatever the hell they want. Thanks lazy idiot masses for not standing up for your own rights, now none of us have any because you are to lazy and enjoy sitting back pointing a finger and laughing right up until it is you on the other side and it is too late.

    1. platy Guest

      @ CommonSense

      Outstanding!

      But too penetrating an insight for most herein to grasp...

    2. magice Member

      I disagree. That's complete nonsense.

      This would be equivalence of an Amazon employee criticizing Amazon on media pretending to be outsider. What do you think Amazon would do?

      The problem is *not* that the lady complained. That would have been ok. The problem is that the lady caused a PR troubles against the employer of her own mother. What do you do when an employee causes trouble against their own employer (especially when they don't...

      I disagree. That's complete nonsense.

      This would be equivalence of an Amazon employee criticizing Amazon on media pretending to be outsider. What do you think Amazon would do?

      The problem is *not* that the lady complained. That would have been ok. The problem is that the lady caused a PR troubles against the employer of her own mother. What do you do when an employee causes trouble against their own employer (especially when they don't go thru the official, internal channels)? Most employers have some mechanisms for employees to report issues and suggest improvements. Had this lady gone through that (or, at least, when reaching out, don't start with public media) and gotten in trouble, I would have empathized. But to start with media is ridiculous.

      (side note: it's also a different matter if you are a paying customer; in which case, you can always vote with your wallet)

    3. platy Guest

      @ magice

      Sure employers try to curtail employee's interactions with the media. They may even successfully seek remedy against an employee if they perceive a transgression.

      But has the substance of the lady's original complaint (her original correspondence reportedly circulated) been published by any media outlet? I can't find it. So tell me, just what reputational damage has been done to AC? Judging from the self righteous and know-it-all baying hounds on this blog AC...

      @ magice

      Sure employers try to curtail employee's interactions with the media. They may even successfully seek remedy against an employee if they perceive a transgression.

      But has the substance of the lady's original complaint (her original correspondence reportedly circulated) been published by any media outlet? I can't find it. So tell me, just what reputational damage has been done to AC? Judging from the self righteous and know-it-all baying hounds on this blog AC has nothing to worry about - too many are uncritically blaming the traveller!

      It is certainly in the public interest to learn that AC will punish its employees for the actions of their family members.

      The "employee" herself hasn't caused trouble against their own employer, she simply arranged an allowable non rev ticket - the employee certainly cannot allow / disallow a family member from lodging a grievance, can she?!

      And just what is the legally defensible outreach of the employer onto members of an employee's family?

      An employee criticising Amazon on media may fall under the conditions if employment enabling Amazon to take action - but should Amazon's reach extend to prohibiting a family member of an employee lodging a complaint about Amazon (even if they enjoyed a sharable staff discount) and especially, if such complaint had foundation - or should a family member be prohibited from exercising their free speech?

      Just remember it is now very common to resort to social media (a type of pubic media) to get a complaint heard by an airline. It's called leverage.

      How long until a reward customer is lumped into the non rev category?

    4. DF Guest

      I have to disagree with your take on this. I have personally dealt with non- rev travel, and in all the experiences I’ve had, the employee from whom I’ve received benefits has always said/made it known that there is a standard of behavior when traveling as a non-rev. The expectations for non-rev travel are made clear to the employee during initial training and if the employee chooses to extend those benefits to others, it’s their...

      I have to disagree with your take on this. I have personally dealt with non- rev travel, and in all the experiences I’ve had, the employee from whom I’ve received benefits has always said/made it known that there is a standard of behavior when traveling as a non-rev. The expectations for non-rev travel are made clear to the employee during initial training and if the employee chooses to extend those benefits to others, it’s their responsibility to make sure the others are all aware of the consequences of bad behavior. It would be a different story if there were no set expectations, however since there are guidelines in place it’s only fair that the employee gets punished per the guidelines. The moment someone uses your non-rev benefits, I think it becomes airline business and the airline has control over the situation. If an employee is worried that someone can cause a problem, they shouldn’t extend their benefits to them. It’s a risk the employee takes and it’s also something they should understand.

      Social media and communicating with the media in general is also something that is typically covered within training and also in the employee handbook. Most unions will also commonly advise members to stay away from media/social media unless they have guidance from the union. This ensures the employee is protected and also that the union has a genuine case in the event the airline takes any action.

      Overall, I think that the employee in this situation was treated fairly. The employee definitely knew (or if they didn’t know, there were definitely methods of finding out the consequences) what could happen. As the saying goes, there’s no such thing as a free lunch. Non-rev travel is great, but there are also standards in place that must be followed.

    5. ThankfulCanuck Guest

      Employees sign agreements that they are solely responsible for ANYONE who travels on their passes.

      There are SO MANY reminders when booking non rev travel, which is a big reason non revs often don't give out tickets to people they don't trust.

      Flying standby is one step up from a jumpseat, whether you get J or economy, you are costing the airline by being there and it is a PRIVELEGE that can be taken away...

      Employees sign agreements that they are solely responsible for ANYONE who travels on their passes.

      There are SO MANY reminders when booking non rev travel, which is a big reason non revs often don't give out tickets to people they don't trust.

      Flying standby is one step up from a jumpseat, whether you get J or economy, you are costing the airline by being there and it is a PRIVELEGE that can be taken away if abused.

      Please don't forget this is Air CANADA and unlike Americans we have employee rights up here. AC pays more than double what US airlines pay staff and ALL EMPLOYEES ARE UNIONIZED.

      You are absolutely right that American labor laws are disgusting, thankfully Canadians have the spines to stand up for ourselves and have protection for our RIGHTS, but flight passes are a privilege not a right as is extremely clear in the contract.

    6. DF Guest

      Your reasoning is flawed on many levels. Yes, non-rev travel is deemed as a privilege, however this is how it’s spelled out in the employment contract. Employees agree to certain terms when they elect to use their non-rev benefits and are in fact contractually bound to the terms spelled out. If they break the terms of the non-rev agreement, they are subject to losing this privilege, which once again is clearly stated in the contract....

      Your reasoning is flawed on many levels. Yes, non-rev travel is deemed as a privilege, however this is how it’s spelled out in the employment contract. Employees agree to certain terms when they elect to use their non-rev benefits and are in fact contractually bound to the terms spelled out. If they break the terms of the non-rev agreement, they are subject to losing this privilege, which once again is clearly stated in the contract. Don’t forget, that the unions negotiate contracts for airline employees. The employees vote on contracts and therefore one can assume they have a say in what goes into the contract. There are two parties to a contract and both parties must agree and sign the contract. If one of the parties disagrees, they can walk away without signing the contract. Same goes for employment. The employees are aware of the rules they are bound to. If they disagree with them, they can always leave. This whole situation would be much different if there were no clear cut rules, but non-reving is definitely as clear cut as it gets.

      I am also surprised by your viewpoint that real contract law that protects consumers does not exist nowadays. There are countless stories of class actions and lawsuits that just prove this point wrong. Sure, contracts serve to protect the interests of a business, but our legal system ensures that consumers are still treated fairly. In my personal opinion, contracts have become so detailed and specific for the sole reason that we live in such a litigious society. It seems like some people out there exist for the sole purpose of finding their next lawsuit. Perhaps if we weren’t so litigious as a society, companies wouldn’t be so trigger happy to create complex contracts to protect themselves. In a sense the current situation is a product of the society we exist in.

  16. Dana Esq Guest

    Obviously this mother never set boundaries or told this brat no. AC should have just banned the daughter for life.

  17. Big AL Guest

    Funny to watch you all get wound up and become your own little Karen's about some hear say from Business Insider. Its tragic to watch.

    What's next Ben 'Oh i read this on TMZ...'..

    Its becoming so frequent i think ole benny is either on the troll or drinking too much.

    1. platy Guest

      @ Big AL

      OMG...I agreed with BigAL...touchdown!

  18. Lindsay Wilson Guest

    You’re bang on with the comments. Staff travel is a privilege not a right. I used to have it (was married to a QF employee) and never flew non-rev for work, in case I needed to change schedule and be unable to access seats.

    The sooner the daughter apologises, the better off their situation will become. But I believe it’s too late already

    1. Arlene Guest

      With AC, it's a major contravention of the rules to fly non-revenue on employee passes for work. It's very clear in the rules.

  19. Azamaraal Diamond

    I cringe when I read one-sided articles like this that could be categorized as click bait.

    As one commenter suggested non-rev's are occasionally treated poorly. Just possibly this was such a case as AC is not necessary known for bending over backward for anybody.

    I am also a little suspicious of all the love Ben has shown Air Canada recently about flight redemptions. Ben claims they are great value. Old redemptions for travel to South...

    I cringe when I read one-sided articles like this that could be categorized as click bait.

    As one commenter suggested non-rev's are occasionally treated poorly. Just possibly this was such a case as AC is not necessary known for bending over backward for anybody.

    I am also a little suspicious of all the love Ben has shown Air Canada recently about flight redemptions. Ben claims they are great value. Old redemptions for travel to South America were about 60,000 pts business class. Now the cheapest rates are in the 260,000 range with 94% in business. 6 months ago I snagged a lowest business at about 90,000 pts that has one 777 leg in economy. (Business and PE are both empty). AC no longer shows Canadians any US airline alternatives. So to us the new Aeroplan is a total bust. But the perk is that we don't pay YQ on Aeeroplan (I never did) but we pay at least 200,000 pts more.

    Are these issues related? I don't know.

  20. Bob hoffriz Guest

    Spoiled,selfish, child/ adult,living in fantasy land. Where do these people get these haughty attitudes from?

  21. Terrence cullinane Guest

    You are representing the company. Wear nice clothes. Be polite. Act like that be prepared. I have done away with pass travel for that reason.

    1. platy Guest

      @ Terrence cullinane

      So, you have done away with your travel pass so you can wear uncool clothes, be ill mannered, act unprepared/ priceless....;

  22. John Doe Guest

    We recently had a HORRENDOUS experience with AC and a family member, who is an employee, BEGGED us not to formally complain or post on social media because they will make the connection and fire them. Makes me sick to my stomach how they treat their customers and employees. (It wasn't always like this with AC)

    1. C. Giddens Guest

      As a former flight attendant of 35 years I can not for the life of me understand how this dependent could be so ungrateful and endanger her mother’s career. I recently traveled on a positive space pass with my brother. This will never happen again. After dinner I fell asleep, he kept drinking and became inebriated and eventually rude to the flight attendant in first class no less. The FA was very gracious and kind not to escalate the situation. Never again!!!

    2. platy Guest

      From outside the industry it's hard to comprehend why the various airline employees responding herein grovel so much to their employers and live in such fear?!

      On the other hand, as a frequent flyer, it's easy to comprehend that a gate agent could be an arrogant twat (a position supported by some of the industry commentators herein).

      I've also witnessed lounge / gate / check-in agents favour staff over revenue passengers over the years. Blatant...

      From outside the industry it's hard to comprehend why the various airline employees responding herein grovel so much to their employers and live in such fear?!

      On the other hand, as a frequent flyer, it's easy to comprehend that a gate agent could be an arrogant twat (a position supported by some of the industry commentators herein).

      I've also witnessed lounge / gate / check-in agents favour staff over revenue passengers over the years. Blatant favouritism.

      Oh and the worst case scenarios I have personally encountered with belligerent staff have been lounge / gate staff on a power trip.

      But, hey, we're dealing with sacred secret airline stuff right? No accountability required.

    3. Arlene Guest

      It's not hard to follow the rules.

      Don't like them? Don't take the perqs.

    4. ThankfulCanuck Guest

      There is 0 chance an employee could be fired for that in Canada, we have employee rights up here.

      BUT, yes flight passes are simply a privilege (a bonus) that can be taken away and that is very clear when signing the contract.

      If you are not polite, well dressed and respectful while flying non rev you deserve to lose your passes and have more space for those of us who understand AC is flying us around the world at a loss.

  23. Bruce Guest

    As not being an employee herself she should be banned for life people like her will make it harder for others who abide by the rules

    1. Michael Bolton Guest

      Put them both on the do not fly list.

    2. platy Guest

      @ Bruce

      Please provide a link to the rules so we can all read them and all be arguing from the same reference pignut. Many thanks.

  24. Suzie Alcatrez Guest

    Travel is not a benefit. Benefits are taxed.

    1. Arlene Guest

      The employees pay tax on passes.

  25. STEVE GURLEY Guest

    Sounds like respect and responsibility are missing in this person. Mom needs to have a talk with Her daughter. Mom also needs to apologize to her employer. Mom should never let her daughter use her employer flying privileges again.

    1. platy Guest

      Mommy needs to tell little Stevie to be more critical of stuff he reads on the Internet...

  26. skedguy Guest

    Best article you've written in a long time. As an ex AC employee there was never any doubt that this sort of behaviour was completely unacceptable and would result in negative consequences. We were aware that his was a privilege not a right.

    I think AC behaved exceptionally leniently as in the past her travel privileges would have been rescinded for life.

  27. platy Guest

    @ Ben

    This mob apparently lifted your whole article...

    https://aix-enews.com/travel/air-canada-revokes-employee-travel-privileges/

  28. uldguy Diamond

    What gets me is that this isn’t likely the daughter’s first rodeo, so to speak. I’m assuming her 62-year old mom has worked for AC for a number of years; perhaps even decades. And if that assumption is true, then chances are the daughter has non-revved with her mom on family vacations and what not more than a few times over the years. And if THAT assumption is true, then the daughter certainly knew the...

    What gets me is that this isn’t likely the daughter’s first rodeo, so to speak. I’m assuming her 62-year old mom has worked for AC for a number of years; perhaps even decades. And if that assumption is true, then chances are the daughter has non-revved with her mom on family vacations and what not more than a few times over the years. And if THAT assumption is true, then the daughter certainly knew the rules, the protocol, non-rev etiquette, etc. yet chose to ignore them anyway.

    And as a non-rev you should have no expectation of receiving good service. Your only expectation should be that, if you are boarded, that you ultimately arrive at your destination in one piece. Expectations that you should be treated like a fare paying passenger, that your bags will arrive with you, that you will get a meal or anything else for that matter, go out the window. You’re not entitled to anything and your expectations should mirror that fact.

    1. RareBus A380 Guest

      Oh I so very sorely disagree with that. Then again, I’m in the US as an airline employee and if I were treated less than stellar I’d raise heck. While using pass travel benefits, you should certainly NOT be treated worse than anyone since you’re a pillar of the company! Who wants to work for a company where when you go to claim your hard earned benefits you’re apprehensive toward using them since you’re treated...

      Oh I so very sorely disagree with that. Then again, I’m in the US as an airline employee and if I were treated less than stellar I’d raise heck. While using pass travel benefits, you should certainly NOT be treated worse than anyone since you’re a pillar of the company! Who wants to work for a company where when you go to claim your hard earned benefits you’re apprehensive toward using them since you’re treated as a lesser than? Absolutely not acceptable. It’s like getting an airline employee discount on a hotel and only expecting a bed and a door. Is that how little you think airline employees and their companions are worth? Lucky for me, I’ve gotten no less than stellar service on any of the carriers I’ve flown on revenue or pass travel. I’m glad everyone doesn’t think like you lol.

    2. Arlene Guest

      The rules are clearly set out.

      I don't believe for a moment that if you were flying non-rev and complained to the media about your flying experience that there would be no consequences.

    3. platy Guest

      @ uldguy

      It could also be the case that if the daughter was a seasoned rodeo rider she would be able to recognise appalling attitude and service from an arrogant gate agent and know when such would need to be challenged no rev rodeo ride or not.

      Without the detail, we just don't know.

      Similarly, to derive realistic expectations of service for non rev passengers, go look at the employment contract and see what it says.

  29. Scotty Guest

    I would have thought by now people would realize that if you are not a happy camper, it doesn't help your cause to "go all Karen" on the alleged miscreant.

  30. Steve Piran Guest

    The daughter,should just shut her god damn mouth. Not only was she travelling FOC,she has the cheek to go to the media over her grievances. This must be a cheap skate women n daughter. Utter fools. They are industry passengers and they should upkeep,the standards of the airline. Shameless mother and daughter.

    1. platy Guest

      @ Steve Piran

      May not have been FOC (there may have been a cash component).

      Could have been the gate agent who didn't maintain the standards of the airline.

      Not sure how staff travel is any more our less "cheap skate" than any of us using miles and points for award seats.

  31. David Yocum Guest

    The entitled Karen screwed over her mother, not Air Canada and it's obvious that she still hasn't learned her lesson by digging h̶e̶r̶s̶e̶l̶f̶ her mom deeper in the hole.

  32. Robert Guest

    As an airline employee, the flying benefits are amazing, however there are some problems that exist that need fixing. When a non-rev employee posts for a flight, and a seat is open they posted for, and the gate agent refuses to give them the seat they requested, that leaves a bad taste in our mouth. As a fate agent myself, I ALWAYS gave our employees the best seat possible, not at the back of coach....

    As an airline employee, the flying benefits are amazing, however there are some problems that exist that need fixing. When a non-rev employee posts for a flight, and a seat is open they posted for, and the gate agent refuses to give them the seat they requested, that leaves a bad taste in our mouth. As a fate agent myself, I ALWAYS gave our employees the best seat possible, not at the back of coach. However the airlines refuse to punish agents who treat fellow employees like crap.
    The benefits are great, and certainly why we give up better pay, for. However there needs to be some integrity there also.

    1. John Guest

      In my airline days, I ran across a few employees who treated non-revs badly. In fact, one of our hubs had a reputation for it — until an agent there mistreated a certain non-rev who turned out to be the CEO.

    2. Buck Guest

      "fate" agent - LOL - a typo that enhances the meaning of gate agent

  33. WBW Guest

    Employee pass travel is a privilege not a right. I fully support Air Canada. I am an employee of an airline and fully agree that employees on pass travel do not have the rights of a paying customer. Employees on pass travel should never bring attention to themselves. Going to social media to complain is unacceptable in this case. I think this person got off lightly.

    1. Mak D. Guest

      When I travelled on my sister's passes, I tried to be invisible unless being complimentary.

  34. George Romey Guest

    Seems as though the mother should have told the daughter in no uncertain terms:
    1. You don't argue with anyone and you don't try to negotiate with anyone
    2. You sit down, shut your mouth and in no way convey to anyone around you that you're traveling free
    3. You dress appropriately
    4. You remember that any action you take will come back on me (the mother).

  35. Kathryn Brown Guest

    A privilege is not a right. It should be appreciated and quit while the mother still has her job.

    1. platy Guest

      @ Kathryn Brown

      It's not a question of either a privilege or a right - it simply depends on the contract of employment...;

  36. Tom Guest

    Clearly the daughter of this Air Canada employee thinks she's special. She is not, she's just very fortunate. If she abusues her privileges then it's only proper that said privileges are revoked.
    Stand your ground Air Canada, if
    not for yourself then for your
    paying customers.

    1. platy Guest

      @ Tom

      How does a badly performing gate agent benefit paying customers?

  37. Bob Guest

    It almost sounds like something an American would do, with their generally overblown sense of entitlement.
    I am an American citizen, and very upset about the sense of entitlement that so many of my fellow citizens have.
    It’s embarrassing......

    1. Mark G Guest

      But it wasn’t an American. It was a Canadian. Maybe the US doesn’t always need to be brought in every conversation.

    2. Morton Guest

      Maybe they should be an example of how people shouldn't be. Entitlement in this country is out of control.

  38. Deuce Guest

    The Employee Travel Guides for most airlines specifically state the employee is held responsible for the conduct of their non- rev travelers and suspensions of travel privileges is possible for violations of the travel policy.

  39. A.T. Guest

    Wow! As an airline employee myself, im disgusted by this woman's conduct and total lack of self respect to herself and especially to her mother. She's very lucky her mother didnt get fired!! An employee should never be mistreated by staff but that complaint shouldve been handled by her mom through the proper internal channels and not by airing it to the world for all to see!

    1. Robert Guest

      The problem is, far too many gate agents refuse to treat employees with respect. I've posted for 1st class on several occasions, and a seat was open, yet was put in the back in coach. That is wrong. As a gate agent myself, I never treat employees that way. It happens far too often, and yet we are powerless to be able to stop it.

  40. Willem Guest

    "Any attention is good" is the unfortunate mantra backing up all these "sensational" news stories attempts...

  41. Skywaydon Guest

    As a retired FA, and with lifetime travel benefits for self + a travel companion, the employee purely is @ fault. The rules of nonrev travel are drilled into one from the date you earn the privilege. Once the daughter's actions were learned, she should have written an apology to AC leadership, assuring them that her daughter's actions were totally inappropriate, and that SHE had removed the daughter from any further nonrev privileges! To have...

    As a retired FA, and with lifetime travel benefits for self + a travel companion, the employee purely is @ fault. The rules of nonrev travel are drilled into one from the date you earn the privilege. Once the daughter's actions were learned, she should have written an apology to AC leadership, assuring them that her daughter's actions were totally inappropriate, and that SHE had removed the daughter from any further nonrev privileges! To have gone to the union or further public/media venues does/did NOT help her cause. She's fortunate to have not been permanently removed from the travel privilege program!

    1. platy Guest

      @ Skywaydon

      You are "purely" blaming the employee for the actions of her family member? Are you still chained to your own parents even in retirement?

  42. MikeyInOregon Guest

    The sense of entitlement especially from Gen Y and Z is what's wrong with this country and elsewhere. She reaps what she sows.

  43. DenB Diamond

    Wow, what a surprise. A post with critical info missing, ranters expressing strong opinion without relevant facts, arguments back and forth. Here's my opinion:
    -what was her original complaint about?
    -what was the airline employee's rebuttal?
    -to hose opining "never complain ever if you're non-rev", would you like to qualify that at all?
    -does the carrier have any contractual obligation at all to a standby passenger using a privilege?
    -is...

    Wow, what a surprise. A post with critical info missing, ranters expressing strong opinion without relevant facts, arguments back and forth. Here's my opinion:
    -what was her original complaint about?
    -what was the airline employee's rebuttal?
    -to hose opining "never complain ever if you're non-rev", would you like to qualify that at all?
    -does the carrier have any contractual obligation at all to a standby passenger using a privilege?
    -is it technically possible for a complaint to be valid in these circumstances? Do we know the circumstances? Do we know her complaint?

    I'm not surprised at the comments. I'm surprised at Ben's emphatic opinion, when half the story is missing. I wanna know what the trigger was for this saga.

    1. TravelinWilly Diamond

      You’re missing the point.

      The complainant went to the media before giving the airline a chance to respond privately.

      She also lied that she was revenue.

      While all your questions are good ones, they have nothing to do with how the daughter behaved.

    2. platy Guest

      @ TravelinWilly

      And maybe you and other are missing the point - the original scenario may have indeed been trivial or it may have been ugly and warranted a complaint at senior management level.

      You don't know whether or not she lied about being revenue. The article states that was alleged in an email from the employer. If the passenger had claimed she was revenue in her email of complaint that would be different to...

      @ TravelinWilly

      And maybe you and other are missing the point - the original scenario may have indeed been trivial or it may have been ugly and warranted a complaint at senior management level.

      You don't know whether or not she lied about being revenue. The article states that was alleged in an email from the employer. If the passenger had claimed she was revenue in her email of complaint that would be different to something that may or may have been said or even misunderstood in a conversation between the passenger and gate agent. In any case "non revenue" is an industry term - some cash may still have been paid - there may have simply been confusion at some point.

      You don't know whether the passenger did already provide feedback on the incident before writing to management and copying in media.

      You don't know which "media" was reportedly copied into the correspondence - folk are potentially committing slander and perjuring themselves on social media and blogs such as this on a daily basis - perhaps even rank hypocrisy of some herein?

      The circulating media articles are just cut and paste and paraphrase of some original - not one such media outlet appears to be making any attempt to verify the story - repeat something often enough and it becomes true in the uncritical minds of many readers (with man example son that shown in response to the original post).

      The article headlines with the statement "allowing a family member to file a grievance" - eh, just what does that mean?!

      Many herein are confused between the concepts of workplace rights, entitlements, benefits, etc.

      Worryingly, there is an apparent acceptance of a culture that denies feedback.

      How long before award seats are treated as inferior too - loyalty members on award tickets treated as lesser?!

    3. Chris Guest

      None of these questions are relevant when pass traveling as an employee. You take what they give you or don't give you, end of story. Zero rights; 100% culpability. Guilty until proven innocent.

    4. platy Guest

      @ Chris

      That may be the case, or it may not - except we need to see how the staff travel entitlements are defined in the contract of employment!

      The airline is not feudal lord absent legal accountability. Employees and most pertinently their families cannot be denied their constitutional rights (either by over reach by an employer or by an attempt to usurp such in a contract).

  44. k matthews Guest

    You really need to have your mother explain to you that even though you are traveling on her past privileges, she is responsible for your conduct and behavior and if you don't conduct yourself in a proper manner or within the guidelines of a non-rev traveler. I hope that you don't cause your mother to lose her job because she is responsible for your conduct. As a non -revenue customer. Keep that in mind. You...

    You really need to have your mother explain to you that even though you are traveling on her past privileges, she is responsible for your conduct and behavior and if you don't conduct yourself in a proper manner or within the guidelines of a non-rev traveler. I hope that you don't cause your mother to lose her job because she is responsible for your conduct. As a non -revenue customer. Keep that in mind. You should just let it go. It happened and that's it. That's one of the travel perks for working for an airline and if you cross the line, the airline has every right to terminate your travel privileges and or terminate your mother's employment. Because of you.

    1. Suq Guest

      Are you clueless? When you CC the media, you have to know you have to accept ANY consequences.

    2. Anthony Troncale Guest

      This issue aside, as a paying customer who recently spent the night on the floor of Montreal Airport due to incompetent Air Canada I have no sympathy for this airline under any circumstances.

  45. tipsyinmadras Gold

    well well well, if it isn't the consequences of my own actions

    and in compliance with Canada's dual-language laws:

    tiens, tiens, tiens, mais c'est les conséquences de mes propres actions

  46. Bobby Borne Guest

    This is Air Canada, one of the worst customer service airlines in the world. People who travel know this. They are often caught exaggerating, lying, and scamming people out of money by claiming weather caused flight cancellations and refusing refunds. This woman embarrassed them and rather than fix the problem they punished their employee. The era of non transparency for them has ended.

    1. Mark D. Guest

      @ Booby Bourne:

      You're the OP, aren't you?

  47. Chad Guest

    I am a non rev person I use my dad's employee passes to fly and when I fly I go check in wait for my name to be called if I get on the flight I find my seat I sit down and keep my mouth shut I don't talk to anyone about it the flight attendant knows who I am I act like I should I don't ask for special treatment or anything else it's a privilege to get to use them and I respect the rules and I think this person is in the wrong for what ever reason

  48. M. Casey Guest

    When traveling “standby, as an employee or dependent” and at a gate - even if the gate agent is completely wrong (the sky is green) - chose your words, actions carefully. There are times in our lives we just accept, and move on; saying silently to ourselves, “Is this the hill” in this case, her daughter has made this a mountain. What must one’s child self-importance be that she could ultimately cause her mother to...

    When traveling “standby, as an employee or dependent” and at a gate - even if the gate agent is completely wrong (the sky is green) - chose your words, actions carefully. There are times in our lives we just accept, and move on; saying silently to ourselves, “Is this the hill” in this case, her daughter has made this a mountain. What must one’s child self-importance be that she could ultimately cause her mother to lose her job. Even as she says this, she is mounting this campaign.

    This is why, when you ask an airline employee for a Buddy pass, we say, “Sorry, I’m all out, or I didn’t get any this year”

    1. Topgun Guest

      Same here. I never have any buddy passes

  49. Rhys Guest

    I’ve had flight benefits at multiple major US airlines and typically try to avoid any confrontation with agents, try to minimize agent’s work load, and never mention the benefits to other passengers. I would never dream of going to the media, that would be idiotic. On the flip side, while most agents are friendly to non-revs flying on pass benefits, some agents with poor attitudes treat us like trash. I have no idea what this...

    I’ve had flight benefits at multiple major US airlines and typically try to avoid any confrontation with agents, try to minimize agent’s work load, and never mention the benefits to other passengers. I would never dream of going to the media, that would be idiotic. On the flip side, while most agents are friendly to non-revs flying on pass benefits, some agents with poor attitudes treat us like trash. I have no idea what this AC pass rider may or may not have encountered, but I have had gate agents file official complaints about me like one time when I was a new parent and was simply asking the different between stroller types and which one has to be checked versus being allowed onto the plane so I can use it at the connecting airport. That agent lied about my behavior and that of my wife so sometimes I do wonder about the lots of power in such a position as a gate agent. Most times even if treated poorly, you let it roll off your back, wait patiently, and eventually get your seat. New tech such as automatically issuing non-revs seat assignments online help reduce interactions with and the workload of gate agents. When I give a buddy pass to a trusted friend, I tell them not to complain no matter what happens, and even if they were a top tier elite, none of that applies to a buddy pass. Bottom line, involving the media was idiotic and the person deserves the travel benefit suspension regardless of how she was treated.

    1. M. Casey Guest

      Let’s unpack your comment - I had complaints (plural) filed against me. You write as if YATA. It is NOT the gate agents job to inform you of YOUR companies policies when you have the same access to the information they do - the stroller

    2. platy Guest

      @ M. Casey

      And presumably not the gate agent's job to file specious complaints either?!

      Maybe the complaints filed against you had substance if you displayed the attitude in your post towards your customers. Maybe you were brilliant at your job. Who knows.

  50. RetiredATLATC Diamond

    Like ya know, for sure, play stupid games win stupid prizes.

  51. Kevin Guest

    The daughter should have minded her own business she’s the type of person that screws it up for everyone and don’t give a $&it about anyone but her own pathetic self-entitlement. get a life

  52. Gaby Blue Guest

    As a 40 year veteran with the airline industry this kind of behavior could result in airlines rethinking their employee travel benefits where thousands of employees could suffer as a result. In these turbulent times where airlines are struggling due to limited staffing this person should be thankful that she made it on a flight at all. My adult children have all travelled extensively using their travel benefits and if anything have always travelled with...

    As a 40 year veteran with the airline industry this kind of behavior could result in airlines rethinking their employee travel benefits where thousands of employees could suffer as a result. In these turbulent times where airlines are struggling due to limited staffing this person should be thankful that she made it on a flight at all. My adult children have all travelled extensively using their travel benefits and if anything have always travelled with the notion that they are privileged and not entitled. With front line airline staff working under tremendous pressure these days this traveler should have been thankful she could travel at an attractive price and kept what is apparently a big mouth shut.

  53. TakingOff Guest

    Married to a Hilton employee. She isn't even allowed to fill out surveys when sent or post property reviews on any sites. I'm allegedly not supposed to either, when I'm traveling with her on the employee rate.

  54. Rob Guest

    Reminds me of an incident on United many years back. Was flying on a RTW Star Alliance business class ticket. Was also a top tier Lufthansa (Senator) at the time. My next leg of the journey was on Air Canada in business class from Vancouver to LAX connecting with Air New Zealand to Sydney. Air Canada flight cancelled so forced onto United flight via SFO. However, suddenly found myself in economy as United only operated...

    Reminds me of an incident on United many years back. Was flying on a RTW Star Alliance business class ticket. Was also a top tier Lufthansa (Senator) at the time. My next leg of the journey was on Air Canada in business class from Vancouver to LAX connecting with Air New Zealand to Sydney. Air Canada flight cancelled so forced onto United flight via SFO. However, suddenly found myself in economy as United only operated economy and first class on that leg. Politely mentioned that an upgrade to first class would have been appropriate given the nature of my ticket but was told that first class was full. After complaining to the onboard manager (and being more insistent), I was told they would move a pax from first to economy to accommodate me. I told her that I did not want someone to sacrifice their first class seat for me. It finally emerged that there were no paying first class pax on the flight and the first class cabin was full of United “employee owners”, Amazing that they were initially prepared to downgrade a paying pax to accommodate their own staff. Air New Zealand were very accommodating after my “trauma” and upgraded me to first class for my journey to Sydney. All’s well that ends well.

  55. globetrotter Guest

    But there is no defense for the mother to seek out the union to resolve this issue. The mother should write a public apology to AC expressing her regret, appealing for its mercy and chastise her daughter. The unions normally defend their members at all costs for all ridiculous excuses. But when they cannot afford such defense, it means the case is unequivocally meritless and is indefensible. I remember reading a LA Times article more...

    But there is no defense for the mother to seek out the union to resolve this issue. The mother should write a public apology to AC expressing her regret, appealing for its mercy and chastise her daughter. The unions normally defend their members at all costs for all ridiculous excuses. But when they cannot afford such defense, it means the case is unequivocally meritless and is indefensible. I remember reading a LA Times article more than two decades ago that investigated a teacher who sued the school district for his job back. It cost the LAUSD seven years of legal fees, paid leave and benefits to remove him. By the way, if she is an administrator, why did she seek out the union?

    1. platy Guest

      @ globetrotter

      Of course there's a defence for the mother too seek out the union. It's her workplace right to do so.

      Who knows what politics is going on behind the scenes with any given airline with respect to staff travel.

      One could speculate that an airline's executive would love to remove staff travel if they could, but it is presumably legally locked into the employment contracts (maybe not - can somebody clarify)...

      @ globetrotter

      Of course there's a defence for the mother too seek out the union. It's her workplace right to do so.

      Who knows what politics is going on behind the scenes with any given airline with respect to staff travel.

      One could speculate that an airline's executive would love to remove staff travel if they could, but it is presumably legally locked into the employment contracts (maybe not - can somebody clarify) and not easily done.

      Let's not be too quick to jump to very presumptive and superficial conclusions, no?

      It is feasible that AC is pleased to scapegoat the players (keeps those pesky employees under control) and the staff travel issue is delicately in play behind the scenes between unions and employers.

      Only giving hypothetical examples of why being too knee jerk reactionary is likely to miss the real story under the surface...

  56. None of your business Guest

    What an entitled pair of $%$$# if you get my drift

  57. Jason Guest

    I really do not understand why the mother doesnt intervene and tell her daughter to stop.

    1. Scudder Gold

      Because she has no control over the monster she created.

  58. Mark G Guest

    Normally I would agree about the sense of entitlement of the non-rev passenger. However Air Canada has been so terrible lately I can only imagine what actually happened for the daughter to email management and the media. Clearly misrepresenting herself as a paying customer was wrong, but if she was complaining about the arrogant and unhelpful attitude of the Air Canada employees then I’ll say she was echoing the sentiments of a least a few...

    Normally I would agree about the sense of entitlement of the non-rev passenger. However Air Canada has been so terrible lately I can only imagine what actually happened for the daughter to email management and the media. Clearly misrepresenting herself as a paying customer was wrong, but if she was complaining about the arrogant and unhelpful attitude of the Air Canada employees then I’ll say she was echoing the sentiments of a least a few paying passengers who didn’t say anything. I will say if Air Canada goes after the mom for this then it will reinforce my opinion of them as a terrible airline that will do anything to avoid taking responsibility for terrible service.

    1. KOKO Guest

      that’s not the way staff travel works ..
      you don’t say a thing - period ..
      having passes is a privilege NOT a right ..
      There is no recourse what happens to you on standby flights .. I been “bumped” numerous times from a flight some times days .. it’s the nature of the beast and the trvllr should have just kept her mouth shut ..

    2. DenB Diamond

      Nonsense. The issue here is that a non-rev passenger copmplained about something, and we don't know what. The opinion you express cannot be formed honestly, without the missing information. Frankly this post shouldn't have been posted without that one piece of missing info, IMHO.

    3. platy Guest

      @ DenB

      Yay - there's actually someone herein with their critical faculties switched on!

      Respect...

    4. Aviation_Fan New Member

      As a non-rev you don't get to complain. That's the way it works. There are guidelines and policies that need to be followed. You don't follow them, you lose the perk.

    5. platy Guest

      @ Aviation_Fan

      You must certainly SHOULD get to complain - have you considered that the original issue may have related to the safety or security of the operation or an individual employee or passenger?

    6. platy Guest

      @ KOKO

      Access to staff travel benefits is either part of your contract of employment or it's not - which is it?!

  59. Ralph4878 Member

    I've seen several non-revs on the last 3-4 flights I've taken over the last month - either in uniform or with their carry-ons giving them away. All of them seemed to go out of their way to quietly find their seats in a quick manner and not seek any special treatment when approached by FAs. I don't think airline employees should have to go out of their way to show their appreciation for their non-rev...

    I've seen several non-revs on the last 3-4 flights I've taken over the last month - either in uniform or with their carry-ons giving them away. All of them seemed to go out of their way to quietly find their seats in a quick manner and not seek any special treatment when approached by FAs. I don't think airline employees should have to go out of their way to show their appreciation for their non-rev perks - they work hard for us, the traveling public and put up with so much crap! That said, lying about your status as a non-rev passenger and complaining to the media about your experience is ridiculous. I know to some that Air Canada is a national embarrassment and folks love to complain about them (by the end of my first month living in TO, I think I heard more complaints about AC than the weather!), but biting the hand that feeds you is never a good idea when your mom's job is part of the equation.

  60. uldguy Diamond

    Wow. What a total ingrate. Employee travel passes are a benefit; not an entitlement. Her mom may now very well face further action by the company because her daughter can’t keep her damn mouth shut. Most if not all airlines take non-rev misbehavior very seriously and the consequences can be severe.

    I retired from the industry over ten years ago and frankly haven’t used my passes since because it is way too difficult to...

    Wow. What a total ingrate. Employee travel passes are a benefit; not an entitlement. Her mom may now very well face further action by the company because her daughter can’t keep her damn mouth shut. Most if not all airlines take non-rev misbehavior very seriously and the consequences can be severe.

    I retired from the industry over ten years ago and frankly haven’t used my passes since because it is way too difficult to non-rev these days. Employees getting stuck in Europe and other popular destinations for days on end happens all the time. This is especially true as a retiree as we are boarded after all current employees are cleared. Nowadays I just buy tickets.

    1. platy Guest

      @ uldguy

      Just why should an employee or legitimate family member due a staff travel benefit as part of their employment have to fawn over the airline, crawl around in unceasing and suppliant gratitude, or be too terrified to pass feedback?

      Just what sort of feudal workplace culture have these organisations arrived at?!

      Too many of you appear to have been brainwashed by your employers to accept such a servile state of affairs (accepting you...

      @ uldguy

      Just why should an employee or legitimate family member due a staff travel benefit as part of their employment have to fawn over the airline, crawl around in unceasing and suppliant gratitude, or be too terrified to pass feedback?

      Just what sort of feudal workplace culture have these organisations arrived at?!

      Too many of you appear to have been brainwashed by your employers to accept such a servile state of affairs (accepting you left the industry 10 years ago - maybe it's got worse).

    2. Common sense Guest

      When someone gets a desired benefit for basically nothing, it’s hardly servile. Brainwashed is believing your entitled to a certain company’s benefit when YOU CHOSE to go work there rather than do anything else with your “talent”.

  61. Rodney Villa Guest

    As a retired F/A with 42 years with a US carrier, I have seen this many times involving "dependents and/or buddy pass" riders onboard flights. This is the reason I NEVER offered any of my passes to anyone, family or friends. It was/is not worth being reprimanded or losing my job over this and having the lost of income.

    1. Brad Guest

      I also am a retired F/A, first PA then another major US carrier. I am with YOU. You dressed for First, were gracious, discreet and quiet. WOW !! And I have seen a number of kids UPG to F in place of adult SR employees. Thats not right but we kept quiet.

    2. platy Guest

      @ Rodney Villa

      As an industry veteran, can you explain why a rev versus a non rev passenger should get any different treatment in actual service?

      Equally why a rev versus a non rev passenger shouldn't be subject to the same standards of behavioural decorum?

      Surely a rev passenger should not be able to obviously recognise a non rev over a rev?

      Why have we ended up in a position where those on staff travel are made to feel and act like they are worthless low life?

    3. DF Guest

      The answer to why a rev vs non rev would be subject to different treatment lies right within your question. A “non-rev” passenger does not contribute to the revenue of the airline…I’m not saying that employees should be treated like trash by any means, but these people aren’t paying to fly therefore there are different rules they have to play by. All the rules for travelling as non-rev are spelled out clearly so it’s not...

      The answer to why a rev vs non rev would be subject to different treatment lies right within your question. A “non-rev” passenger does not contribute to the revenue of the airline…I’m not saying that employees should be treated like trash by any means, but these people aren’t paying to fly therefore there are different rules they have to play by. All the rules for travelling as non-rev are spelled out clearly so it’s not like any employees are caught off-guard. If employees don’t want to follow these rules, the solution is simple….purchase a ticket and travel as a revenue passenger. It’s also the same reason why a non-rev pax may be inconvenienced during their travel. For example if there are not enough business class meals on a flight, a non-rev employee would be the first to receive an economy class meal. It’s part of the non-rev travel experience. If the employees are not happy with their compensation then they can find other employment. They agreed to this compensation when they started the job.

    4. platy Guest

      @ DF

      Thanks. Your points are well made. There are some curious angles.

      These passengers ARE paying to fly (albeit at greatly reduced rates) - the concept that these flights are entirely "free" is incorrect. These seats have also been "paid for" through the service of the employee.

      No doubt there are rules written down somewhere. Unfortunately, despite several industry insiders responding, nobody on this blog has been able / taken the time either...

      @ DF

      Thanks. Your points are well made. There are some curious angles.

      These passengers ARE paying to fly (albeit at greatly reduced rates) - the concept that these flights are entirely "free" is incorrect. These seats have also been "paid for" through the service of the employee.

      No doubt there are rules written down somewhere. Unfortunately, despite several industry insiders responding, nobody on this blog has been able / taken the time either to link to or extract relevant quotes from such documentation. We don't know in the case of AC exactly what the 'rules" are to be followed. Note the difference between presumed perception (oh they were supposed to do this or that) and actual rules (specified, written, relevant, defensible). Many folk herein are very quick to judge based on what they think the rules are - but not one of those people has cited the relevant document(s). This is especially relevant when extending to family members, since it raises various issues.

      Yes, IME (at least what I have been told by airline employees) travelling staff are sometimes treated like "trash" by other staff - why should this be so?! Perhaps this perception that you should somehow have to be eternally thankful and suppliant over this element of your employment's compensation (?).

      This stuff about on board meals stuff is really about airlines not wanting t cater appropriately - yes, it makes sense to prioritise rev passengers, but only if you accept the practice of flights being inadequately catered.

      I've come across this as an upgrading passenger - QF used to deny on departure upgrades because there weren't enough meals loaded (on my regular CNS-SYD or BNE flight 15 out of 25 odd business seats on a 767 would fly empty) - then they decided to process the upgrades with a "meal not guaranteed" sticker on your boarding pass upon upgrade - latterly they got their shite together. This for rev passengers using miles to upgrade coach to business ("first").

      To agree to the compensation as part of the job, then the relevant definitions of staff travel would need to be in writing.

      Incidentally, as somebody who has designed safely training in aviation, I would argue strongly for an employee's right to challenge any action or situation in their workplace that could be perceived as a safety issue. For this reason, it would be anathema to enable system that precluded any right to challenge the actions of another employee.

      Many thanks for your thoughtful and informed contribution.

  62. Dick Bupkiss Guest

    This is a complete outrage. Shame on Air Canada for treating this highly valuable influencer so badly. She needs to travel! Social media posts don't write themselves, you know? Oh the humanity.

  63. PaulS Guest

    I worked for an airline and loved this perk and was always mindful that as a non-rev, there should be a reasonable expectation of a different standard of service. Such as being bumped for a last minute rev-pax, not getting a meal onboard, customer service to serve rev-pax first, etc etc. But the most important thing was to treat my colleagues with courtesy and respect, which goes a long way when trying to get on a flight.

    1. Sean M. Diamond

      It is not unreasonable to have an expectation of good service, even as a non-revenue "customer". I've passed on negative (and positive) feedback about flight experiences many many times when flying on travel benefits and it has been universally appreciated for the most part.

      The problem in this case seems to be that the narrative from the traveler did not correspond to the facts uncovered during the investigation, and furthermore that the traveler chose to...

      It is not unreasonable to have an expectation of good service, even as a non-revenue "customer". I've passed on negative (and positive) feedback about flight experiences many many times when flying on travel benefits and it has been universally appreciated for the most part.

      The problem in this case seems to be that the narrative from the traveler did not correspond to the facts uncovered during the investigation, and furthermore that the traveler chose to get the media involved. Those are both "death penalty offences" in the world of airline travel benefits and unfortunately that seems to be what the employee has received.

    2. YULtide Gold

      Agreed. However aside from the ill-advised media involvement a key difference is that you are an industry insider and can offer negative feedback from an informed perspective (and presumably in a constructive manner), whilst the passenger in this case was not an airline employee and whatever complaint was raised came from an uninformed perspective.

      How embarrassing for the mother to have such a high maintenance daughter trashing her employer in public.

    3. platy Guest

      @ YULtide

      And yet, you yourself have no problem with trashing the daughter in public, even with a most limited knowledge of the events that occurred! How embarrassing to be such a hypocrite!

      The perspective came from that of a non industry traveller - that would represent the customer experience nd perceptions of the customer base of the airline in question.

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uldguy Diamond

Wow. What a total ingrate. Employee travel passes are a benefit; not an entitlement. Her mom may now very well face further action by the company because her daughter can’t keep her damn mouth shut. Most if not all airlines take non-rev misbehavior very seriously and the consequences can be severe. I retired from the industry over ten years ago and frankly haven’t used my passes since because it is way too difficult to non-rev these days. Employees getting stuck in Europe and other popular destinations for days on end happens all the time. This is especially true as a retiree as we are boarded after all current employees are cleared. Nowadays I just buy tickets.

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TravelinWilly Diamond

You’re missing the point. The complainant went to the media before giving the airline a chance to respond privately. She also lied that she was revenue. While all your questions are good ones, they have nothing to do with how the daughter behaved.

6
Rodney Villa Guest

As a retired F/A with 42 years with a US carrier, I have seen this many times involving "dependents and/or buddy pass" riders onboard flights. This is the reason I NEVER offered any of my passes to anyone, family or friends. It was/is not worth being reprimanded or losing my job over this and having the lost of income.

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