10% Of KLM Passengers From South Africa Test Positive For Coronavirus

10% Of KLM Passengers From South Africa Test Positive For Coronavirus

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Update: As a follow-up to this story from yesterday, of the 61 passengers who tested positive for coronavirus from these two KLM flights, the omicron variant has been found in 13 of them, so that accounts for ~21% of the cases on these flights.

Around 10% of passengers on KLM flights from South Africa yesterday tested positive for coronavirus upon arrival, despite a pre-travel testing requirement. That sure makes you wonder

Friday’s eventful KLM flights from South Africa

We’re seeing all kinds of new travel restrictions added as a result of the omicron coronavirus variant. Many countries are banning nonstop flights and travelers from South Africa, and some KLM passengers got caught up in that yesterday.

KLM operates flights from both Cape Town (KL598) and Johannesburg (KL592) to Amsterdam, and Friday’s flights were problematic. The Netherlands imposed a South Africa flight ban on Friday in light of the new variant, but at the time KLM flights were already enroute from South Africa to the Netherlands.

When the KLM flights landed at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport, authorities weren’t sure what to do with these passengers. One flight was held on the tarmac for several hours, and a New York Times Global Health Reporter was even on the flight, live Tweeting the whole situation.

Eventually passengers were allowed to deplane, but then passengers had to undergo mandatory testing. And that’s where this story gets especially interesting, if you ask me.

At least 61 KLM passengers test positive for coronavirus

Of the roughly 600 passengers on the two flights, at least 61 people have tested positive for coronavirus, which is a positivity rate of around 10% (and presumably more people will test positive for coronavirus in the coming days). This is pretty wild, because it’s reported that passengers also had to show a negative coronavirus test result prior to travel, taken within 24 hours.

Passengers were kept at the airport until their coronavirus test results were available. Of the 61 passengers who tested positive, 13 tested positive for the new omicron variant, so that represents around 21% of the passengers.

Passengers who tested positive need to go into quarantine — those who live in the Netherlands can quarantine at home, while others were put into hotels. Those who tested negative have been told to quarantine for at least five days, though could continue their travels to their final destination.

What should we even make of this?

It’s pretty shocking to consider that 10% of passengers on these two KLM flights tested positive for coronavirus:

  • Passengers had to get tested prior to travel, suggesting that they only started testing positive within the past 24-36 hours
  • If anyone caught coronavirus on the plane, it’s unlikely that they’d test positive so quickly after contracting it, suggesting that most people testing positive had coronavirus before even getting on the plane
  • We don’t know much about the omicron variant yet, but between vaccination, pre-travel testing, natural immunity, etc., you can’t help but wonder what’s going on that’s causing 10% of passengers to test positive
  • While South Africa is seeing an increase in coronavirus cases, the number of passengers who tested positive for coronavirus is disproportionate to the epidemiological situation in the country (as of now)

I’ve written in the past about how coronavirus testing for travel is a shady business. Not only is it really easy to fake a coronavirus test result, but the providers that do the testing are also often questionable, in terms of analyzing test results, verifying that the person being tested is who they say they are, etc. I can’t help but wonder how many of the pre-travel testing results were legitimate…

Bottom line

Two KLM flights from South Africa yesterday made headlines, as the Netherlands banned flights from South Africa while these planes were enroute. In the end passengers were allowed to disembark in Amsterdam, but then had to be tested. At least 61 of the 600 passengers have tested positive for coronavirus. That’s an incredibly high number, especially when you consider that these passengers also had to be tested before travel.

What do you make of the positivity rate of KLM passengers from South Africa?

Conversations (69)
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  1. DTS Guest

    Interesting: most comments on negative tests prior to departure conclude that the tests were forged.
    Please be advised, and we know that since the early days of the pandemic: you will likely not test positive immediately after becoming infected with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus causing Covid 19), it usually takes at least 48hrs. And you will likely become infectious rather quickly after becoming infected.
    Meaning, there is a period where you test negative after...

    Interesting: most comments on negative tests prior to departure conclude that the tests were forged.
    Please be advised, and we know that since the early days of the pandemic: you will likely not test positive immediately after becoming infected with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus causing Covid 19), it usually takes at least 48hrs. And you will likely become infectious rather quickly after becoming infected.
    Meaning, there is a period where you test negative after an infection, but you already pose a risk to others.

  2. Jetset Guest

    The NYTimes journalist was interviewed by the BBC on a recent Global News podcast episode and confirmed not all passengers were required to present a negative test.

    Amsterdam apparently doesn’t require a negative test for transit and so PCR results were only required if your final destination needed it. So lots of folks who wouldn’t have been tested.

  3. Richard J Tallman Guest

    I don’t get it. Why are you the only one talking about this 10% positivity rate of passengers. As soon as I red the news yesterday I thought to myself… how many people fly on 2 wide bodies? That’s around 600 people, I thought to myself… and 61 people testing positive well… that’s about 10%!!! That is truly incredible, and terrifying, to think that 10% of a flight would be positive. And then I started...

    I don’t get it. Why are you the only one talking about this 10% positivity rate of passengers. As soon as I red the news yesterday I thought to myself… how many people fly on 2 wide bodies? That’s around 600 people, I thought to myself… and 61 people testing positive well… that’s about 10%!!! That is truly incredible, and terrifying, to think that 10% of a flight would be positive. And then I started to check all of the news wires waiting for at least 1 member of the press or news organization to mention this alarming statistic, but until now, nobody has. So this morning I did a google search of “10% test positive on KLM flight” and I found your article/post. Until now you are the only one who has mentioned this, which I find to be the real story here… good job to you and let’s wait to see how long it takes before anybody else finds it a good idea to highlight this really scary statistic!

  4. Flieger Guest

    The testing is a business. And the people that test you couldnt care any less, be it in a "reputable" testing facility... such as a CVS or Walgreens, or in some shady "a guy in a shack doing covid tests for money" business. These are total checkbox exercises and I do not understand why any country would accept tests from places like SA and the likes...

    1. Bev Guest

      I would have thought the same thing. Ironically South Africa has a very advanced scientific/ medical community, which is why several pharmaceutical companies do much of their testing in South Africa. Perhaps the legal restraints are fewer and processes are more affordable. South Africa is one of the few countries that uses genome sequencing for Covid tests - far more advanced than how we test in the USA. This would explain why 2 of these...

      I would have thought the same thing. Ironically South Africa has a very advanced scientific/ medical community, which is why several pharmaceutical companies do much of their testing in South Africa. Perhaps the legal restraints are fewer and processes are more affordable. South Africa is one of the few countries that uses genome sequencing for Covid tests - far more advanced than how we test in the USA. This would explain why 2 of these variants first "showed up" in South Africa (and were then found to be wider spread). Those of us living in the USA should be thankful that South Africa is being so forthright with their information, instead, we are punishing them. We can rest assured this new strain is all over our country by now - which is probably why 1000's of passengers from South Africa have been allowed to freely disembark in the USA over the weekend (since the KLM report).

  5. AC360 Guest

    If someone is only going to change flights in Amsterdam (transient passengers), they probably don’t have to present a negative COVID test result. Right? In other words, some of the passengers who tested positive probably weren’t even required to present a negative COVID test result before boarding the KLM flight.

  6. Jorge Paez Guest

    How come sometimes your last paragraph is a "conclusion" and other times it's a "bottom line?"
    What is the frequency Kenneth?

    Peace out.....

  7. NotMyName Guest

    Even if PCR testing is a requirement, my recent travels to Kenya opened my eyes to something. I had to receive a negative PCR test (required by Kenya, not the US) before heading back to the U.S.. At the bottom of my test results, there was a clear disclosure that mentioned the FALSE NEGATIVE rate is a whopping 44%! Not 0.44%, but legitimately 44%. I don't know if that is specific to testing methods in...

    Even if PCR testing is a requirement, my recent travels to Kenya opened my eyes to something. I had to receive a negative PCR test (required by Kenya, not the US) before heading back to the U.S.. At the bottom of my test results, there was a clear disclosure that mentioned the FALSE NEGATIVE rate is a whopping 44%! Not 0.44%, but legitimately 44%. I don't know if that is specific to testing methods in Kenya.

    So, out of 50 tests administered to known infected, 22 of those will show no infection. That's insanity. Hell, if I tested positive but travel hinged on results, it would be in my best interest to take just 2 more. One of which would likely (not definitely) come back negative. Why are we even bothering with the tests? It's giving a false sense of security, whereas if we just treated everyone like they were patient zero then we may avoid outbreaks.

  8. Jon11432 Guest

    It’s pretty easy to forge and falsify a COVID test. Most labs will email you the results as a pdf document and all it takes it opening it and converting it to words change the dates convert it back to pdf. And there you go, you’ll never know and people will do this because they know that there’s just too many travelers for the airline to have to call the labs and verify the test....

    It’s pretty easy to forge and falsify a COVID test. Most labs will email you the results as a pdf document and all it takes it opening it and converting it to words change the dates convert it back to pdf. And there you go, you’ll never know and people will do this because they know that there’s just too many travelers for the airline to have to call the labs and verify the test. What labs should do is include a QR code that when scanned it verifies the test immediately! Or airlines can require you upload the test 24hr before checkin and Then verify it, pretty simple stuff if companies really cared to invest in health and safety. I’m happy to have my shots it’s opened the world for me as I enjoy traveling. I Take traveling very seriously so 4 days before I travel I self quarantine to prevent myself catching COVID and interrupting my trip, I then take an antigen test and I keep myself safe from that point on throughout my travel.

  9. GBOAC Diamond

    @Nathan: you state "flu is a lot more dangerous"
    Please provide evidence that this is the case. AFAIK flu has not killed over 700,000 Americans in the past 20 months

  10. Paul Guest

    There was no pre-travel test requirement - prior to this flight (and for flights arriving from most countries still), the Netherlands is proof of vaccination *or* a negative test… and the test can be an antigen test from within 24 hours of departure… not exactly the most reliable test.

  11. Anthony Diamond

    As expected, most of these cases weren’t even omicron…

  12. Steven M Guest

    News reports underscore how terribly KLM treated the passengers — both on the planes and off.

    What a surprise if disease spread as a result from the barbaric conditions to which they were subjected.

    Anyone who has arrived on an early morning flight in Amsterdam from Africa knows how badly arriving passengers are generally treated, herded like cattle and shouted at — this is nothing new. We've experienced this ourselves. It's appalling.

  13. ConcernedFlyer Guest

    Based on what I saw traveling internationally over the last few weeks, having a negative PCR test is probably the easiest thing on earth to doctor/forge. Anyone stupid enough to avoid being testing for the public good is probably sadly clever enough to know how to easily circumvent these checks. There's not a single vaccine/PCR checkpoint that I went through where I feel I could not have used fake documentation and would have been caught.

    1. Dick Bupkiss Guest

      Agree 100%. I think many of us have seen/heard others laugh and brag about faking vaccine cards and/or negative COVID tests required to travel.

      I hope there's a crackdown on these bastards, with serious jail time (many years) imposed for anyone caught playing such games.

  14. Jorge Paez Guest

    What if those negative pre flight tests were not legit?

  15. Josh Guest

    This is not a good development for sure. God help us if the US airline system has to go back into lockdown. Don't think the government will hand out more bailouts to these companies! IF you work for an airline you better be saving your money!

  16. Jance Guest

    Lets hope this exposes the fraud that the anti-vax, anti-max, anti-test idiots use to get on planes and cheat their way around common-sense public health requirements.

    The NYT reporter onboard the flight from JNB to AMS specifically noted all the idiots sitting around her with no masks on, citing that as an example of how humanity is doomed. If it comes out that many people routinely fake the required health documents needed to travel (and...

    Lets hope this exposes the fraud that the anti-vax, anti-max, anti-test idiots use to get on planes and cheat their way around common-sense public health requirements.

    The NYT reporter onboard the flight from JNB to AMS specifically noted all the idiots sitting around her with no masks on, citing that as an example of how humanity is doomed. If it comes out that many people routinely fake the required health documents needed to travel (and I suspect this practice is rampant, I've heard people proudly bragging they do this), then a crackdown probably will -- and should -- follow, impacting all of us, unfortunately. Gonna get a lot harder to fly because of that, even for those of us who follow the rules. When that happens, look for the anti-mask, anti-vax crowd as they howl about tyranny.

    1. Stuart Guest

      I agree. I think fake cards are pretty rampant in the U.S. I know of three people (not friends but colleagues) who brag about traveling the world with them. Apparently they are easy to get with a one shot J&J notation. If we could develop a more cohesive system like in the EU it would greatly curtail this.

  17. Hiro Guest

    At least South Africa was being transparent to the world. No state control, true democracy indeed.

  18. Bobo Bolinski Guest

    Ah, the knuckle-dragging, nazi boot-licking, right wing Q-Publican reality denialists are out in force. Can't inconvenience them just for some silly pandemic that has killed over 5 million so far, and may just be warming up for its next act. As long as they can buy their fake vaccination certificates and phony test results, they're happy, waiting for JFK Jr to rise from his grave and refusing to take basic measures like wearing a mask. America made great again!

  19. Santastico Guest

    So what? One way or another everyone will get Covid sooner or later. Virus won’t disappear so better learn how to live with it.

    1. Ray Guest

      I agree that we may all eventually get it. I also agree it won't disappear anytime soon. More reason than not for all the idiots to get vaccinated so the world doesn't have to keep spending billion on their medical care, the testing, the additional labor and time required for all of this. If they would stop the stupidity, get vaccinated, the world would move forward much quicker.

    2. Steve Diamond

      Obesity is a bigger problem in terms of spending billions to keep up their medical care. No one fit and healthy is dying from this. Get your shots and get in shape. Too bad we are not allow to shame people for being obese like we can shame people for vaccines.

  20. jason Guest

    I hope the Holland Government gives a good reliable, rigorous and scientific explanation.

  21. Beachfan Guest

    Thanks for the info Lucky!

    Would you consider an article that talks about where/how much it costs/etc. when you are a tourist who gets a positive test in a foreign country?

    What if you are already in a hotel. What if you aren’t? Does trip insurance cover quarantine (some do my research indicates).

    Seems like this will be relevant for 2022 planning. If you covered France, Spain and maybe a couple other countries, that would be awesome!

    1. RAM Guest

      From an Australian perspective - most travel insurers have very detailed extensive paragraphs on what they cover but more shorter less detailed lines on the exclusions.

      Virtually no travel insurer (worldwide) will cover you if your home country shuts its borders & locks you out - you have to pay for your own food/accomodation etc.

      Very few travel insurers will cover you (at all) if the Govt of a country where you are shuts borders...

      From an Australian perspective - most travel insurers have very detailed extensive paragraphs on what they cover but more shorter less detailed lines on the exclusions.

      Virtually no travel insurer (worldwide) will cover you if your home country shuts its borders & locks you out - you have to pay for your own food/accomodation etc.

      Very few travel insurers will cover you (at all) if the Govt of a country where you are shuts borders for in & outbound travel.

      You need to download the various PDFs (some have supplementary ones to the general T&Cs) - go through them carefully, then ring the insurer noting down the date, time of day, name of who your speaking with, any key points they make/confirm, the length of your call.

      That's what its taken for people I know to get paid out when they needed to claim & the travel insurer initially said the T&Cs say they were not covered.

  22. Tim Dunn Diamond

    Viruses mutate to become more contagious but also become less deadly. Studies will have to show if that is the case with Omicron but that was true with earlier variants, in part due to higher vaccination and better therapeutics.

  23. D3kingg Guest

    Omicron. What variant will they come up with next ? Pi ? Thankfully by the time they try to invent Zeta they will be voted out of office.

    1. SadStateofOurCountry Guest

      Fortunately they were voted out of office in November 2020 (and the election wasn't stolen, he is just a sore loser).

    2. david Guest

      Yes and COVID didn't go away! So it must be all Biden's fault now, right?

    3. RAM Guest

      This is the 13th 'variant of concern'. Hope nobody's superstitious.

      That's why it was given the 13th letter of the Greek alphabet.

      Luckily only Alpha & Delta turned out to be serious threats. The odds are favourable....

    4. EBWaa Guest

      This is one of the dumbest things I have ever read on this site, which is remarkable given that I’ve read a bunch of your previous comments.

    5. Ray Guest

      @EBWaa: I second your nomination, @D3kingg has said some completely idiotic comments in the past but this one sinks lower than ignorant.

  24. Alan Guest

    I think all travel should stop for 30 days and then access the situation. Life is more important than travel.

    1. Robert Schrader Guest

      No one cares what you think.

    2. Anthinymm Guest

      No one cares about “freedom” when you’re dead.

    3. GBOAC Diamond

      Robert's multiple comments on this thread indicate a depressing low ability of "thinking" on his part. His most recent comment is pure projection:-)

    4. EBWaa Guest

      Are you under the impression that people care what you think, Robert?

  25. Bob Guest

    Would be curious to know how many of the ~60 postive test people on these flights had prior association with each other. E.g. are there large groups as part of this?

    I had seen reports of sports teams, travel groups, university groups etc scrambling to get out the of country prior to expected travel bans...

    Clusters could easily explain that type of test prevalence.

  26. Saint82 Guest

    I certainly would trust his response over the prior “bleach” idiot!

  27. WIll Guest

    Joe has this handled, I'm sure of it

  28. Alex_77W Guest

    All this actually shows that none of the current measures like tests before the flights (even within 24 hrs) and, perhaps, vaccination (although there is no data on how many of those passengers were fully vaccinated; I expect a rather high %) are effective in controlling the spread of the new mutation. If all this is the case, none of the past measures like double masking, quarantines, social/physical distancing, etc. will be effective.
    The...

    All this actually shows that none of the current measures like tests before the flights (even within 24 hrs) and, perhaps, vaccination (although there is no data on how many of those passengers were fully vaccinated; I expect a rather high %) are effective in controlling the spread of the new mutation. If all this is the case, none of the past measures like double masking, quarantines, social/physical distancing, etc. will be effective.
    The only hope is that the new variant would be much less deadly. Then we all get infected quickly with minor symptoms and the entire world will reach the herd immunity. This is how all the previous pandemics caused by respiratory viruses ended in the past.

    1. Ralph4878 Guest

      This event shows none of what you've claimed. There is no evidence yet that those who tested positive were or are infected by the new variant. And, even if they are, we do not know what their adherence to masking and social distancing guidance was/is like. Furthermore, under 25% of South Africans are fully vaccinated, so there's a very good chance those flying were either a) not vaccinated, if South African, or 2) were in...

      This event shows none of what you've claimed. There is no evidence yet that those who tested positive were or are infected by the new variant. And, even if they are, we do not know what their adherence to masking and social distancing guidance was/is like. Furthermore, under 25% of South Africans are fully vaccinated, so there's a very good chance those flying were either a) not vaccinated, if South African, or 2) were in close contact with many non-vaccinated folks while visiting South Africa or surrounding countries (whose vaccination progress has been even slower - Botswana is at 20%, Namibia is at less than 12%, according to Oxford's Our World in Data project). Catastrophizing and bad information aren't helpful here - reason and science are.

    2. Bob Guest

      More jumping to wild conclusions with out evidence.

      We don't know how transmissible Omicron is. We don't know how it competes with Delta in a high vaxxed population; a moderately vaxxed population, or heck, even a low vaxxed population (there was very little COVID Delta or otherwise circulating in South Africa). Currently we know that A) Omicron has a bunch of mutations, some on the vaccine target sites on the spike protein and B) it...

      More jumping to wild conclusions with out evidence.

      We don't know how transmissible Omicron is. We don't know how it competes with Delta in a high vaxxed population; a moderately vaxxed population, or heck, even a low vaxxed population (there was very little COVID Delta or otherwise circulating in South Africa). Currently we know that A) Omicron has a bunch of mutations, some on the vaccine target sites on the spike protein and B) it is currently increasing in counts in a low-vax population

      Slow your roll, people, let the science catch up to the media panic-fest.

  29. jfhscott Guest

    Well,

    I just finished an afternoon stroll in Cape Town. People here are not running around like chickens with their heads cut off. I do not know what it was like a week ago, as I was in the US, but there is masking, at times with exposed noses, but an air of general calm. The club lounge at the Hyatt is open.

    And I hate to tell everyone in the west, but if Omricon is what people say it is, it is surely already hiding in plain sight outside of Africa.

  30. Matthew Guest

    I think it would be important to review the tests submitted to KLM to see what kind were done and by what providers. The rapid tests are known to be inaccurate. I’ve done several self administered test and although it feels like I’m going deep, when I’m able to watch myself do it, I’m surprisingly not deep at all. I do count long seconds out loud, otherwise I find that most providers say I’ve done...

    I think it would be important to review the tests submitted to KLM to see what kind were done and by what providers. The rapid tests are known to be inaccurate. I’ve done several self administered test and although it feels like I’m going deep, when I’m able to watch myself do it, I’m surprisingly not deep at all. I do count long seconds out loud, otherwise I find that most providers say I’ve done it long enough too quickly. I thought it was weird that the rapid test was 5 seconds each nostril, but the PCR was 10 seconds for one. Here in Illinois, testing locations have popped up everywhere. A lot of them offering both rapid and PCR at the same time. Given the explosion in locations, I do tend to wonder if they’re just after the easy money. I honestly wish we would get to a point where testing is unnecessary for the vaccinated. If a variant comes out that overwhelms the healthcare system again, then treatment should be prioritized for the vaccinated. They did the responsible thing to help society. For those who choose not to get vaccinated without a medical reason, they should share more of the healthcare costs. A COVID hospital stay could easily cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, that could easily have been prevented with a $20 shot. It doesn’t seem fair to penalize the vaccinated with mandatory quarantine and expenses especially if they’re asymptomatic and unlikely to pass the virus on. Anyway, my guess is the KLM passengers had a PCR test administered with a deep sample taken, which is why so many asymptomatic positive passengers were discovered (I doubt many were traveling with symptoms). I bet millions of people travel daily with asymptomatic cases. Another wave is coming, and waves will keep coming for several years - just look at past pandemics, it happens every single time. The vaccines will keep severe hospitalizations down, but they won’t be able to eradicate a highly transmissible airborne virus, ever. I hope at some point we get nasal vaccines with attenuated virus, which might help develop a more robust immune response where it’s needed most.

  31. Stuart Guest

    What is even more concerning is that you can assume that everyone on the flight was vaccinated.

    BA,LH,AF, DL, UA etc all had flights land as well from S.A. and only the Dutch seemed to isolate the passengers and test them. Imagine the thousands of people now circulating around Europe and the U.S. with this strain that were not held up like in Amsterdam.

    I guess the reports that this strain is 500% more...

    What is even more concerning is that you can assume that everyone on the flight was vaccinated.

    BA,LH,AF, DL, UA etc all had flights land as well from S.A. and only the Dutch seemed to isolate the passengers and test them. Imagine the thousands of people now circulating around Europe and the U.S. with this strain that were not held up like in Amsterdam.

    I guess the reports that this strain is 500% more transmissible than Wuhan is ringing true. Let's pray it doesn't make people as sick as Wuhan or Delta. If it does, the end of travel for some time is upon us.

    1. Never In Doubt Guest

      If it’s not everywhere already, it will be soon enough. There’s no bottling anything up.

      COVID is *never* going away. Ever.

      It’s already endemic, and will rise & fall with seasons/variants/whatever.

      Time to adjust policy/our lives to recognize that fact.

    2. Bob Guest

      I see we are at the jump to wild conclusions currently not supported by evidence stage of things. No one knows yet how much more transmissible Omicron is. And the comparison that is relevant is how does it's transmissibility compare to Delta... not to the original

    3. Robert Schrader Guest

      If you think global travel needs to be shut down indefinitely due to the spread of a virus that is already endemic on the planet, I don’t think you should be posting comments on a travel blog. It’s probably best for you to move on to another hobby.

    4. Stuart Guest

      Oh Robert, back for more? Where did I say I support shutting down global travel? I said the likelihood, given the reactions of many Governments, especially in Asia and Europe thus far, is that if this is found to be very transmissible on planes that we could see widespread shut downs of air travel along with border closings. I don't support this. And I feel people need to make their own choices as to risk....

      Oh Robert, back for more? Where did I say I support shutting down global travel? I said the likelihood, given the reactions of many Governments, especially in Asia and Europe thus far, is that if this is found to be very transmissible on planes that we could see widespread shut downs of air travel along with border closings. I don't support this. And I feel people need to make their own choices as to risk. But let's be real, if 10% of passengers (and likely more soon in the case of KLM) are found to be testing positive on flights, air travel will be dead...regardless if they ground them or not.

      But you go right ahead getting aggressive again with me as you have in the past. As you know, I will be happy to come right back at you ten-fold. You continue to attack anyone here that might impede on suggesting or having thoughts that dare to potentially impede your job as a mediocre travel planner for clients who don't know any better. That's not my problem. Go find a new career.

      Now you can run off to the admins at OMAAT and complain as you have done before that someone dares to comment anything here against the great Instagram star Robert Schrader.

  32. Anthony Diamond

    It seems like most (if not all) of these cases were asymptomatic. And we don’t even know if they were all omicron. I think people in general need to wait for more data before major sweeping conclusions, banning travel, etc. For the most part, it looks like we are doing that. In the meantime, everyone get vaccinated or booster - even if this variant is more able to evade some immunity, current vaccines still should...

    It seems like most (if not all) of these cases were asymptomatic. And we don’t even know if they were all omicron. I think people in general need to wait for more data before major sweeping conclusions, banning travel, etc. For the most part, it looks like we are doing that. In the meantime, everyone get vaccinated or booster - even if this variant is more able to evade some immunity, current vaccines still should be enhance protection against infection and really protect against sickness

  33. Romanianflyer Guest

    "Passengers had to get tested prior to travel, suggesting that they only started testing positive within the past 24-36 hours"

    This is not true - at least not for pax travelling to the Netherlands. Only now has South Africa been classified as a 'high risk' country by the Dutch Government with compulsory testing requirement before the flight. Until 26th November, a valid vaccination passport was enough to travel to the Netherlands.

  34. David Guest

    I would suggest there were lots of examples of forged COVID test paperwork involved rather than some new variant that can infect so many people so quickly.

    1. devin New Member

      You said it's not the current administration's fault that COVID did not go away.
      One and a half years ago, the current administration's members used to tweet how "un-American" travel bans were. Inflation is also at a 31-year high. I am sure these are not the current administration's fault, either.
      Supporting an administration no matter what happens shows that people confuse administrations with sports teams.

    2. Ray Guest

      @devin: the last administration was called out as a racist when the bans coincided with his Muslim ban attempt. But to your conclusion: I don't disagree when you compare supporting administrations is the same as sports teams, especially in the last 20 years (since Baby Bush).

  35. UK Guest

    Maybe omicron needs to be taken seriously? :(

    1. Robert Schrader Guest

      Maybe you should stay home if you’re scared? It’s astonishing to me that almost two years into this, people are still shaking in their damn boots. If the virus was going to kill you by now, and already would have done so. What a weak coward you are.

    2. Fleurgle Guest

      Says the angry little troglodyte flinging insults from his mom’s basement.

    3. portmanteau New Member

      We will have to see until the sequencing results come out to know if they’re infected with Omicron

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Romanianflyer Guest

"Passengers had to get tested prior to travel, suggesting that they only started testing positive within the past 24-36 hours" This is not true - at least not for pax travelling to the Netherlands. Only now has South Africa been classified as a 'high risk' country by the Dutch Government with compulsory testing requirement before the flight. Until 26th November, a valid vaccination passport was enough to travel to the Netherlands.

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UA-NYC Guest

Nothing of what you posted reflects the truth - care to source your BS? Here's some actual information for you: https://www.statista.com/chart/26159/covid-cases-us-age-group-vaccination-status/ "Depending on the age group, hospitalization rates were ten to 15 times higher for unvaccinated individuals"

5
Santastico Guest

So what? One way or another everyone will get Covid sooner or later. Virus won’t disappear so better learn how to live with it.

4
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