Delta One “Premium Lounges” Coming To JFK, LAX, BOS, In 2024

Delta One “Premium Lounges” Coming To JFK, LAX, BOS, In 2024

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While Delta is by many metrics considered the most premium airline in the United States, one area where the airline has lagged the competition is when it comes to premium lounges dedicated to international passengers. While American has Flagship Lounges and United has Polaris Lounges, Delta hasn’t historically had dedicated international lounges.

We’ve known for some time that this is going to be changing, and we now have more details of what that will look like. Delta has formally announced plans to introduce three new premium lounges in 2024, so let’s go over the details.

Delta One business class lounges coming to three airports

Delta has announced plans to open three premium lounges in 2024, which will be in New York (JFK), Los Angeles (LAX), and Boston (BOS). Interestingly the airline isn’t labeling these as being specific to Delta One (the name of Delta’s premium international business class product), but I assume that’s the intent here.

Delta states that access guidelines for these premium lounges are still being worked out. I think it goes without saying that those on a Delta One ticket will get access. I imagine the question of access guidelines comes down to whether Delta elites get access under some circumstances (maybe Delta 360 members, or Delta Diamond Medallion members on select itineraries), and whether partner premium passengers get access (like those flying business class on other SkyTeam airlines).

Here’s how Claude Roussel, Delta’s VP of Sky Club and Lounge Experience, describes the new concept:

“We want each of our guests to receive a highly personalized and dedicated level of service. It’s not enough to have beautiful spaces and exceptional offerings. Premium lounge customers should feel welcomed and known when they walk in the door, just as they would at their favorite hotel or restaurant. We look forward to providing that warm welcome and making ‘premium’ feel personal for each guest.” 

Let’s now go over the details of the three lounges that Delta will be opening. No two of the premium lounges will be alike, as each location will include elements inspired by and unique to its host city.

Delta premium lounge New York (JFK) opening June 2024

In June 2024, Delta will be opening its first premium lounge in Terminal 4 of New York Kennedy Airport (JFK), near Concourse B. This will be a massive 38,000 square foot facility, and will no doubt be the most impressive in the collection. Amenities will include a full-service brasserie and a casual, chef-assisted market with open kitchens. There will also be dedicated wellness areas, as well as a year-round terrace.

This is the only lounge we have renderings of so far, and I’ve gotta say that it looks great.

Delta premium lounge JFK bar
Delta premium lounge JFK restaurant
Delta premium lounge JFK terrace

Delta One premium lounge Los Angeles (LAX) opening late 2024

In Q4 2024, Delta will be opening a premium lounge in Terminal 3 of Los Angeles Airport (LAX). The lounge will be 10,000 square feet, and will be directly accessible by elevator from the Delta One check-in area. That will create a pretty seamless experience for those originating their travels in Los Angeles, so that’s cool.

Delta One check-in LAX

Delta One premium lounge Boston (BOS) opening late 2024

In Q4 2024, Delta will be opening a premium lounge in Terminal E of Boston Logan Airport (BOS). The lounge will be 6,300 square feet, with seating for 120 passengers. This will be connected to the newly opened Delta Sky Club in Terminal E, so eligible guests will have access to both the premium lounge and the Sky Club.

Given how small the lounge is, I suspect the intent is that the premium lounge will have an elevated dining concept, and then you can hang out in the main Sky Club, if you’d like, as that’s 21,000 square feet.

Delta Sky Club BOS

Bottom line

Delta has announced plans to open three new premium lounges in 2024, in New York (JFK), Los Angeles (LAX), and Boston (BOS). For now these are being marketed as premium lounges rather than Delta One lounges, though it seems pretty clear what the intent is here.

Delta is long overdue for introducing dedicated lounges for its premium international business class passengers, so it’s nice to see that Delta has plans to open three facilities this year. The JFK location in particular sounds impressive, as it’ll be a massive, and should help with alleviating crowding in the Sky Clubs.

While I can’t believe how long it has taken Delta to introduce this, I suspect that these facilities will impress, especially given how Delta has been able to watch what American and United have done with their premium lounges.

What do you make of Delta’s plans for new premium lounges?

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  1. iamhere Guest

    The big question will be if domestic Delta One can access not just international

  2. Roberto Guest

    Lol, just as the other 2 of the big 3 have done for years? *yawns*

    1. Tim Dunn Diamond

      the other 3 that Ben and Gary and every other travel writer recognizes don't provide a basic lounge product anywhere near as good as DL's?

      And, again, either the general public is incredibly stupid and patronizes Delta at gunpoint or they really deliver a product that they pay a premium for.

      and if UA still manages to miss Delta's revenue by $4 billion and AA by $5 billion per year, just think how much that number will grow to with these Delta one lounges.

    2. Roberto Guest

      Move along, OCD Delta Boy. Your opinion is not needed on my comment or the 47 other novels you wrote.

    3. Tim Dunn Diamond

      neither is your comment.
      If you choose to post your drivel, I will make sure there is a rational and fact-based response.

    4. Roberto Guest

      If Ben posted an article about new Amtrak service, you would still spew your “rational & fact-based responses” about Delta being number one between some unrelated city pair somehow. It’s beyond annoying. Tim, there’s freedom of speech, which I believe you’re allowed to comment every post, but seriously dude... Please get back on meds or seek professional help. It’s unhealthy to have such an obsession about something you cannot control. You can be subjective as...

      If Ben posted an article about new Amtrak service, you would still spew your “rational & fact-based responses” about Delta being number one between some unrelated city pair somehow. It’s beyond annoying. Tim, there’s freedom of speech, which I believe you’re allowed to comment every post, but seriously dude... Please get back on meds or seek professional help. It’s unhealthy to have such an obsession about something you cannot control. You can be subjective as a travel blogger and lean towards one particular airline, but you take it to the extreme. Even Ben has negative AA articles. Where are your negative DL articles?

      “the other 3 that Ben and Gary and every other travel writer recognizes don't provide a basic lounge product anywhere near as good as DL's?” —- This article is about premium lounges, not basic ones, which DL is a DISTANT 3rd, even after LAX/JFK/BOS. Do you have a comment on that?

    5. Icarus Guest

      In a country where lounge access isn’t even automatically complimentary when travelling in a premium cabin, it’s a joke anyhow in the rest of the world

  3. Ricko Guest

    None of this matters until delta stops flying ancient aircraft and devaluing status. I’d rather have a decent seat to sleep in than a fancy aircraft catered meal. The lounge lizards will disagree, but when you have the luxury of choice in nyc it’s more preferable to fly a newer, consistent hard product on UA / AA or a foreign carrier where I can efficiently use miles earned post travel. I won’t set foot on delta if I don’t have to!

    1. Tim Dunn Diamond

      every time someone comes up w/ that tripe, I have to remind you that United operates the oldest fleet among major global airlines and older than any other airline.
      and United DOES NOT have an international fleet of fully Polaris equipped aircraft - don't forget the 757s.

      and if you value 50 seat regional jets, UA IS the airline for you

      AA simply does not have the network esp. from NYC.

      So tell us...

      every time someone comes up w/ that tripe, I have to remind you that United operates the oldest fleet among major global airlines and older than any other airline.
      and United DOES NOT have an international fleet of fully Polaris equipped aircraft - don't forget the 757s.

      and if you value 50 seat regional jets, UA IS the airline for you

      AA simply does not have the network esp. from NYC.

      So tell us again why you will fly someone else - but get the facts right.

      You don't have to do anything but if you bother to post, at least get the facts right.

    2. MaxPower Diamond

      Cute, tim

      Probably Because delta’s 767s use an ancient J seat and delta doesn’t have all aisle access across their widebody fleet.

      United upgraded their entire fleet. Delta didn’t

      It really is sad to see how much of your day you spend responding to just about every commenter that is realistic about what delta is and isn’t of that differs from you in their opinion.

      AA’s network is fine and they have...

      Cute, tim

      Probably Because delta’s 767s use an ancient J seat and delta doesn’t have all aisle access across their widebody fleet.

      United upgraded their entire fleet. Delta didn’t

      It really is sad to see how much of your day you spend responding to just about every commenter that is realistic about what delta is and isn’t of that differs from you in their opinion.

      AA’s network is fine and they have great JV partners too, including from NYC despite an inferior position to delta and united. Oretty sure anyone is happy to fly aa’s consistent and non crappy 767 fleet out of jfk or BA, IB, EI, CX, JL, QR, QF…

      You need to calm down

    3. John S Guest

      United upgraded their entire fleet? Been to HNL lately where they almost exclusively fly the ANCIENT 777-200s from LAX, SFO, and DEN. The “Polaris” on these dinosaurs is a mind numbing 8 across!

    4. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      None of this matters until delta stops flying ancient aircraft

      Please. You could count on one hand the percentage of passengers who have any clue what even the ballpark age of the aircraft type/model (or the seat product) they're flying on, actually is.

  4. Peter Guest

    Wondering if Delta could deliver a "highly personalized and dedicated level of service" to hoards of SkyTeam J/F passengers. Maybe that's mostly KLM/AF and Korean, so tenable.

  5. Grey Diamond

    The fact that Atlanta is not even mentioned shows that they are not really invested in offering a premium product. Only in trying to keep up with the competition. Not surprising in and of itself, but not what you would expect from an airline that makes every effort to pretend to be a premium option.

    1. Tim Dunn Diamond

      we can argue all day long about what is "premium" but in any other industry, it means commanding a higher price and Delta most certainly does that.

      and the reasons why Atlanta and Detroit and MSP and SLC are not included are noted below.
      You might or might not agree but those are very rational explanations that align with where Delta is offering its first Delta One lounges.

      And, AA and UA most certainly...

      we can argue all day long about what is "premium" but in any other industry, it means commanding a higher price and Delta most certainly does that.

      and the reasons why Atlanta and Detroit and MSP and SLC are not included are noted below.
      You might or might not agree but those are very rational explanations that align with where Delta is offering its first Delta One lounges.

      And, AA and UA most certainly do not offer their most premium lounges in every gateway where they have international flights - so are they even less premium at those gateways?

    2. Eskimo Guest

      @Tim Dunn

      Premium in any other industry?
      Maybe Delta is premium in TimDunnstry.

      Just like there is nothing “premium” about Taylor Swift.

    3. Tim Dunn Diamond

      Delta managed to generate $4 billion more revenue in 2023 than United and $5 billion than AA.
      And Delta generated $2 billion more in profits than UA and almost $4 billion more than AA.

      Again, tell us what quantitative metric you would like to propose for the definition of "premium" but Delta clearly checks far more boxes than any other airline.

      You don't like reality so attack those that succeed at doing what your...

      Delta managed to generate $4 billion more revenue in 2023 than United and $5 billion than AA.
      And Delta generated $2 billion more in profits than UA and almost $4 billion more than AA.

      Again, tell us what quantitative metric you would like to propose for the definition of "premium" but Delta clearly checks far more boxes than any other airline.

      You don't like reality so attack those that succeed at doing what your preferred carrier cannot do.

      and I could care less about Taylor Swift but she has succeeded at her craft and monetized it better than anyone now and perhaps she will hold onto that record for all time.
      Her bank accounts are most certainly premium.

    4. Burger_King New Member

      McDonalds is insanely profitable. Does that make it a premium restaurant?

      How do you not understand the difference?

    5. Tim Dunn Diamond

      you only read half of the definition - to no surprise

      McDonald's does not command high fares. They do lots of volume. THAT is the definition of Southwest - in good times.

    6. Burger_King New Member

      Triggered.

    7. Tim Dunn Diamond

      just here simply to make sure that distortions and incorrect statements are challenged.
      Simple answer is to not make them in the first place.

  6. Lee Guest

    As it stands, the Premium lounge is for 1) all Delta One passengers and 2) Delta 360 in any cabin class on Delta One routes. Unless there is a change, Diamonds will not have the same access as 360s -- they will need a Delta One ticket.

    1. Javi Guest

      Where did you hear this from?

    2. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      in any cabin class

      Sincerely doubt they'll allow even 360s if on a Basic Economy ticket.

  7. Anthony Diamond

    I mean... I guess I am more excited about the potential for these lounges to reduce crowding than the lounges themselves?

    1) At JFK, LAX or BOS, I will always be originating or departing

    2) I like the JFK and LAX lounges currently. Big fan of LAX's skydeck

    The biggest benefit of these will likely be better complimentary food and drinks (stuff like champagne being offered standard). But I am fine with SkyClub mimosas and bloody Marys currently.

    1. NK3 Gold

      Totally agree. I was happy that the original announcement from Delta today also mentioned that the second SEA will tentatively open in Q4. Another 38k sq ft lounge space at JFK, 21k sq ft at SEA, 15k at CLT, 10k at LAX, 6.3k at BOS, plus expansions at LGA and MIA--that is nearly 100k square feet of extra lounge space across the network this year.

  8. ZTravel Member

    If delta wants to do this right, they have to limit them to ONLY Delta One pax. If they start allowing Elite Plus traveling on non-Delta metal and 360..etc, it will dilute the value and exclusivity.

    That being said, the rendering look basic and generic and as one of the comments here pointed to the smaller DTW lounge, and if that’s true. delta shouldn’t bother positioning them as “premium”.

    Delta needs a major network...

    If delta wants to do this right, they have to limit them to ONLY Delta One pax. If they start allowing Elite Plus traveling on non-Delta metal and 360..etc, it will dilute the value and exclusivity.

    That being said, the rendering look basic and generic and as one of the comments here pointed to the smaller DTW lounge, and if that’s true. delta shouldn’t bother positioning them as “premium”.

    Delta needs a major network / route expansion. If they don’t do that, I’m finding it harder and harder to fly them. Think of souther Europe, Middle East and transpacific routes. They are extremely conservative and we’re headed toward a market that’s going to reward innovation / ease (direct routes even when they are not 100% profitable), service oriented.

    1. Tim Dunn Diamond

      Your comment is fair about who can use the D1 lounges.

      As for network, Delta generated 1.6X more profits per seat mile across the Atlantic in 2023 than UA and even more than that for AA. DL generated about the same percentage more profit than UA across the Pacific.
      AA gets nearly all of its international profit from Latin America. DL and UA are similar.

      Some people resist talking about financials but AA, DL...

      Your comment is fair about who can use the D1 lounges.

      As for network, Delta generated 1.6X more profits per seat mile across the Atlantic in 2023 than UA and even more than that for AA. DL generated about the same percentage more profit than UA across the Pacific.
      AA gets nearly all of its international profit from Latin America. DL and UA are similar.

      Some people resist talking about financials but AA, DL and UA and every other major global carrier are for-profit businesses. They simply cannot deliver a quality product across a growing network if they trail their competitors financially.

      even regarding size, DL and UA are about the same size to Europe; it was only during the pandemic that UA chose to keep its 777s and gained a size advantage but didn't gain any profit advantage other than for one quarter.
      DL's position in the Pacific has been well-discussed but they simply have had to restructure their presence there because the NRT hub inherited from NW wasn't profitable and then the Japanese government gave them a choice to move their Tokyo ops to HND or stay at NRT w a hub. DL chose NRT. Rebuilding of the Pacific including of ICN - but not limited to ICN - will happen.
      In terms of Pacific revenues, in 2023, DL was half the size of UA but twice the size of AA. pre-covid Delta was still the 2nd largest carrier across the Pacific regardless of nationality.
      .
      DL left India because the 777LR was too expensive to operate. The A350s coming in are more than capable and cost efficient for DL to serve that region.
      DL has 48 A330-900s and A350s on order, they provide Delta with enormous growth capability and all of DL's Airbus widebodies are more cost efficient than the counterparts that AA and UA use.

      Delta already operates the most cost-efficient international fleet of the big 3 airlines and generates the most international profits of US airlines. They will use their new aircraft to grow their international footprint.

    2. Tim Dunn Diamond

      correction
      ...the Japanese government gave them a choice to move their Tokyo ops to HND or stay at NRT w a hub. DL chose HND.

      Delta chose to retire their fleet of 18 777s during the pandemic, the smallest 777 fleet of the big 3 because they had enough A350s on order to replace the 777s and that happened by the end of 2022. They have since added on the A350-1000 order so now...

      correction
      ...the Japanese government gave them a choice to move their Tokyo ops to HND or stay at NRT w a hub. DL chose HND.

      Delta chose to retire their fleet of 18 777s during the pandemic, the smallest 777 fleet of the big 3 because they had enough A350s on order to replace the 777s and that happened by the end of 2022. They have since added on the A350-1000 order so now have a very capable and long-range fleet coming.

      DL made the assumption during the pandemic that international demand would return by 2024 and they based their fleet plan around that assumption. UA wanted to be ready to jump and didn't retire aircraft - and got a capacity advantage but not a sustainable profit advantage. AA retired its A330s, 757s and 767s and is not replacing much of that capacity.

      International networks reflect fleet strategies and vice versa. UA thinks it can aggressively grow but DL and other carriers will also grow if there are profits to be made.

      DL's international network will grow; their higher profits and more capable fleet of aircraft orders support that conclusion.

      DL's addition of Delta One lounges will, if anything, favor connecting through one of the 3 hubs that will first have those lounges over their core 4 hubs if a premium lounge is a primary consideration.

    3. Virginia Pacifica Guest

      Business class passengers on partner airlines should certainly be allowed access to these. If Delta One passengers can access the Virgin Clubhouse in Heathrow, denying Virgin Upper class travelers access to the Delta One lounge for would be a huge snub.

    4. dx Guest

      I would guess Virgin Upper Class and KLM Business would be able to use these lounges. Maybe not other partners though since those are the close ones (AF doesn't use the same terminal as Delta at JFK).

    5. Kelt Guest

      I’m not sure why people are always harassing you. I find your comments insightful and informative. Thanks.

    6. Burger_King New Member

      Turning profits does not make an airline premium.

      It’s easy to turn a profit when your 767 is 28 years old, the amenity kit is made in Mexico out of yarn, and the most expensive wine on the plane is $9/bottle.

      Profitable yes, premium no.

    7. Tim Dunn Diamond

      so 150 million Delta consumers aren't smart enough to know that they are paying too much?
      you are just a sore loser that can't accept that your favorite airline can't get the revenues that Delta does so you attack those that actually deliver what you only dream about.

    8. Burger_King New Member

      Timmy, I don’t have a favorite airline.

      I find it so odd that you were fired from Delta yet defend them to the death. It’s delusional.

  9. DLPTATL Guest

    They've already built one of these lounges at DTW (A43) but timing was during the pandemic and it ended up opening as a regular SkyClub but has all the same design features as the rendering for the new JFK lounge and is petite compared to the other DTW lounges. I'm curious if they will carve off space in ATL to create a premium area in either E or the International Concourse lounge. E probably has...

    They've already built one of these lounges at DTW (A43) but timing was during the pandemic and it ended up opening as a regular SkyClub but has all the same design features as the rendering for the new JFK lounge and is petite compared to the other DTW lounges. I'm curious if they will carve off space in ATL to create a premium area in either E or the International Concourse lounge. E probably has more suitable space, but is in the "old" concourse while the lounge in the Intl concourse was already built to a more premium spec, has an outdoor deck, and pre-pandemic was also experimenting with food cooked to order.

  10. Alec-14 Gold

    I get the focus on competitive hubs but how much of their passengers are connecting through other hubs? If I have to have a layover I might pick Dallas or Houston if I get a better lounge experience than Atlanta.

    1. Tim Dunn Diamond

      the answer probably comes down to the fact that Delta wins international premium connecting passengers on other bases than lounge access in the hubs.

      as noted, DL operates widebody international flights from 2 concourses in ATL which makes it even trickier to think about a Delta One lounge.
      And no other carrier operates a premium international lounge in ATL or any of the core 4 hubs.
      In contrast, DL is growing its...

      the answer probably comes down to the fact that Delta wins international premium connecting passengers on other bases than lounge access in the hubs.

      as noted, DL operates widebody international flights from 2 concourses in ATL which makes it even trickier to think about a Delta One lounge.
      And no other carrier operates a premium international lounge in ATL or any of the core 4 hubs.
      In contrast, DL is growing its international position and presence in NYC, BOS and LAX and the investment makes the most sense there.

      and DTW is operating far fewer international flights in part because of the China capacity limitations.

      but all that doesn't mean they won't add DTW and ATL in time.

    2. dx Guest

      I think it's also notable that Delta and United actively connect passengers through NYC to longhaul flights (even with JFK's slot limits), whereas AA clearly wants people to connect in its core CLT, PHL or DFW hubs.

      So Delta (and definitely United since they already had Polaris lounge at EWR and LAX) likely have a combination of both premium business demand out of NYC/BOS/LAX AND they have meaningful connecting flight banks that these lounges will serve.

    3. Burger_King New Member

      As an Atlanta diamond for the last 7 years, and counting, there is no need for delta to provide a better experience to the local crowd. We get below average skyclubs, below average food, and the oldest planes.

      There is no reason to “try” in Atlanta because there is no competition.

    4. Tim Dunn Diamond

      and yet you have managed to build ATL into the world's largest hub which is also very likely the most profitable.

      Get all of your neighbors together and "just say no" or recognize that Delta really isn't that bad and you won't gain much in anything by trying to fly any other way.

    5. Burger_King New Member

      Oh it’s most definitely the most profitable for delta. We get absolutely screwed with pricing out of Atlanta.

      Not so sure I have “managed to build” it into the largest hub. It’s just economics. Cheap labor. Cheap land. Unlimited land. Cheap taxes. Etc. etc. etc.

      Surely you understand all of that Timmy.

  11. NotPremium Guest

    DL forgot the rendering of the entry queues....

  12. Tim Dunn Diamond

    Delta SkyClubs are already higher quality than what AA and UA offers which is why they have not done it so far.
    BOS, JFK and LAX are highly competitive markets where DL is the largest international carrier and intends to grow further so it is no surprise that they are favoring those locations. The core hubs have multiple Sky Clubs and are far less competitive including for a premium lounge which I don't think...

    Delta SkyClubs are already higher quality than what AA and UA offers which is why they have not done it so far.
    BOS, JFK and LAX are highly competitive markets where DL is the largest international carrier and intends to grow further so it is no surprise that they are favoring those locations. The core hubs have multiple Sky Clubs and are far less competitive including for a premium lounge which I don't think any of ATL, DTW, MSP or SLC have for any foreign carrier.

    the biggest takeaway is that DL is using the money it is making on Sky Clubs to dramatically increase its lounge space. Smaller airports like AUS, BNA and MCI benefitted w/ new larger Sky Clubs, LAX and LGA new ones but DL had to build all -new terminals to get them - and now they are focusing on hubs where they have to work within existing facilities - including LAX which they built for a Delta One lounge.

    Delta already has the most lounge capacity of any airline in the world and these new lounges as well as the Sky Club expansions only push that mark further forward.

    add in the larger Delta One cabins on Delta's A350s which will expand to other fleets and Delta will be in a very strong position to compete for even more premium business. No other airline comes close esp. in their ability to turn its international revenues into profits.

  13. Mark Guest

    These 3 locations seem to suggest that they only view this as a need in highly competitive local markets. It should be easier to find space and build in their core hubs (ATL, DTW, etc) yet they didn’t pick a single one to start.

    It’s a very interesting choice to not build one in a code hub which leads me to believe there may be some skyteam access requirements that could flood them with elites flying coach, or something along those lines.

  14. A_Japanese Gold

    I am curious how partner airlines access policy looks like at LAX. Current Korean air lounge is mediocre at best and now airside walkway connects T3 with TBIT where many ST partner airlines serve.

    1. NK3 Gold

      Air France/KLM is suppose to open their own lounge in the TBIT midfield concourse this year. They already bypass the Korean Air lounge and send their premium cabin passengers to the One World lounge.

    1. Miguel Guest

      No surprise they're prioritizing the competitive hubs first. I'd imagine ATL is on the drawing board (as well as DTW, MSP, and/or SEA) but since it's a fortress hub then there isn't as much urgency to get it done.

    2. dx Guest

      JFK (and less so BOS) also have a lot of summer seasonal flights to European leisure destinations, more than some of the fortress hubs actually!

      So combined with the steady flow of LHR/CDG/AMS flights for business travel, it makes tons of sense to start there IMO.

  15. Greg Guest

    8 years late to the party

    UNITED rising with Polaris lounges in LAX, SFO, ORD, IAD, EWR, IAH. And DEN on the way, for 2x as many as Delta.

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Mark Guest

These 3 locations seem to suggest that they only view this as a need in highly competitive local markets. It should be easier to find space and build in their core hubs (ATL, DTW, etc) yet they didn’t pick a single one to start. It’s a very interesting choice to not build one in a code hub which leads me to believe there may be some skyteam access requirements that could flood them with elites flying coach, or something along those lines.

2
Greg Guest

8 years late to the party UNITED rising with Polaris lounges in LAX, SFO, ORD, IAD, EWR, IAH. And DEN on the way, for 2x as many as Delta.

2
Grey Diamond

The fact that Atlanta is not even mentioned shows that they are not really invested in offering a premium product. Only in trying to keep up with the competition. Not surprising in and of itself, but not what you would expect from an airline that makes every effort to pretend to be a premium option.

1
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