My Hotel Housekeeping Habits & Strategy

My Hotel Housekeeping Habits & Strategy

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We all have different habits when staying in hotels. Several readers have recently commented and/or asked about things I mentioned in reviews related to my housekeeping habits. So I figured I’d share my general approach with hotel housekeeping, and I’m curious to hear how the habits of OMAAT readers compare.

I always have the “do not disturb” sign on

When I stay in a hotel, I typically have the “do not disturb” sign on from the moment I check-in until the moment I check-out. The only exception is that I might not put it on the day of arrival, if I think a welcome amenity may be coming.

Why do I religiously use the do not disturb sign? Because if I need something I’ll ask for it. I’ve had way too many hotel staff knock once and open the door a second later, and I’ve had way too many unnecessary interactions from people knocking on the door (like the housekeeping manager checking to see if everything is okay in the room — I’m sure it’s well intentioned, but I’ll let the hotel know if there’s an issue).

I always use the “do not disturb” sign

If I’d like housekeeping, I explicitly ask for it

Since I have the “do not disturb” sign on during most of my hotel stays, my approach is always that I call housekeeping when I’d like my room serviced:

  • Since I typically work when I travel, I spend more time in my hotel room than the average person
  • When I am ready to leave my hotel room, I’ll typically call housekeeping, and explain that I’m leaving the room for X amount of time, and would appreciate if the room could be cleaned
  • I try to be realistic with my expectations; if I’m not staying at a luxury hotel and if the hotel has a lot of guests checking in and out, I recognize that between 11AM and 3PM they might not be available immediately (since the priority is cleaning rooms for guests checking in)
  • I do the same thing for turndown service (for hotels that offer it), where I’ll call housekeeping when I get ready to leave for dinner, and ask them to provide turndown service

I kind of just assumed that this was how many people did it, though some readers seemed surprised on recent posts when I mentioned that in passing. I guess others just don’t use the “do not disturb” sign as much, and wait for housekeeping to knock.

Personally, that system seems inefficient to me. I imagine when housekeeping knocks on doors, a large percentage of those guests aren’t ready to have their rooms cleaned at the moment, and I would guess in some situations housekeeping has to knock on rooms several times before they’re ready to have their rooms cleaned.

That brings me to my next point…

I’ll typically call to request housekeeping & turndown service

I’ll leave the room when housekeeping is there

Again, I’m not sure if others feel similarly to me, but I never want to be in the room when housekeeping is there. Why?

  • If I were a housekeeper, I wouldn’t want someone watching me do my job, so I don’t want to do that to others
  • In this era a lot more people are concerned about personal space, and for that matter it can be awkward to have someone cleaning around you in tight quarters
  • Last but most certainly not least, I’m an introvert, and I’ll go long ways to avoid social interaction (I’m just being honest!)

This is another reason I use the “do not disturb” sign, and request for housekeeping to show up at a certain time. The only catch is that sometimes I’ll return to my room and find that housekeeping is still there, in which case I’ll just leave for a bit longer and return when they’re done.

I leave the room when housekeeping is there

I don’t always want housekeeping

I think the last point to make is that I often just don’t request daily housekeeping at hotels that offer it. Truth be told, at more moderately priced hotels I’ll typically only ask for housekeeping every two or three days, because it’s not like I’m making a huge mess.

Usually when I’m staying at a luxury hotel, it’s a different story. Super nice hotels are more of an “experience,” and part of that is always having a clean space. Housekeeping at luxury hotels often also puts more effort into room service. For example, at Four Seasons they’ll typically put a cleaning cloth next to a pair of glasses or a laptop.

Cleaning cloth from housekeeping at Four Seasons Madrid

Meanwhile at Airelles properties they’ll typically leave a different gift with turndown service every night.

Airelles Courchevel provided a different gift each night

Besides, who doesn’t like their favorite toiletries being refilled? 😉

Bottom line

We all have different habits in life, and obviously that extends to hotel housekeeping. I always use the “do not disturb” sign, and always call to request housekeeping if I want it. I just find that to be the easiest and most efficient for all parties involved.

I had assumed that many people take a similar approach, but I’m not sure if that’s the case.

So I’m curious to hear from OMAAT readers — what are your habits when it comes to hotel housekeeping?

Conversations (68)
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  1. Mark Guest

    Im the same, i always have the do not disturb on while in the room, I quickly tidy around putting my toothbrush and personal things in my case before leaving the room i imagine its not fun cleaning around peoples personal stuff, its always great to return to a refreshed room, if theres nice toiletries and I've opened and used a bit of them i will remove these as i imagine they will throw them...

    Im the same, i always have the do not disturb on while in the room, I quickly tidy around putting my toothbrush and personal things in my case before leaving the room i imagine its not fun cleaning around peoples personal stuff, its always great to return to a refreshed room, if theres nice toiletries and I've opened and used a bit of them i will remove these as i imagine they will throw them away, i then get new ones and carry on using the ones Ive opened previously and take home the new ones to use on other trips.

  2. iamhere Guest

    One thing you did not mention is that some hotels have recently started to give a benefit for not accepting housekeeping every day. The problem is that this benefit is not enough. I was once recently at a hotel within Marriott and they offered only 1,000 points for not having the room cleaned. If this was a low end brand like Fairfield, may be I would have done it, but at any middle to high...

    One thing you did not mention is that some hotels have recently started to give a benefit for not accepting housekeeping every day. The problem is that this benefit is not enough. I was once recently at a hotel within Marriott and they offered only 1,000 points for not having the room cleaned. If this was a low end brand like Fairfield, may be I would have done it, but at any middle to high end then it is not worth me doing. Consider that you pay the same fee if you get the service or not. Consider if you pay or redeem points that 1,000 points is not worth enough.

    In recent years, I have more or less the same strategy as I often have trips that combine work and leisure so I am in and out of the room often. If I am not out of the room for long enough then it would not be convenient for housekeeping.

  3. Toys Samurai Guest

    You are definitely not alone. I always leave the DND sign on when I am in the room. When I go out, I will take it down, no matter what time it is. If the house keeper clean it, great; if not, I am fine.

  4. David Diamond

    I thought I was the only one who leaves the DND on almost all the time.

    On a recent trip to Bangkok, the employees at Waldorf Astoria were concerned about me because I had left DND on for ~3 days, and asked if everything's ok. I suppose we are in the minority and most use DND a lot more sparingly.

  5. Vera Page Guest

    I totally agree! And, I thought I was a weirdo for insisting the DND sign is always showing.

  6. Tommy Guest

    I travel a lot, when I travel it is 12 days at a time. I stay at Hilton hotels. At night when I go to bed I put the do not preserve sign on the door. The reason I put it on the door is because I wake up at different hours once I get up and I'm ready to leave for the day I take the sign off. I usually always see and need...

    I travel a lot, when I travel it is 12 days at a time. I stay at Hilton hotels. At night when I go to bed I put the do not preserve sign on the door. The reason I put it on the door is because I wake up at different hours once I get up and I'm ready to leave for the day I take the sign off. I usually always see and need in the hallway and ask if they can make up my room when they get a chance no rush if it's later in the day I let the front desk know. In all my traveling I have never had an instance of someone knocking on the door and coming in. We all have to do work works for us.
    I also leave a $5 tip every day with a little bag of nuts or chocolate and a note saying thank you.

  7. A M Guest

    DND sign or button on right as soon as I check in. I’d usually remove the sign when I leave the room to go out. If I’m travelling alone then tbh I don’t mind if they do housekeeping/turn down or not. If I need anything specific I’d just call.

    However as others have noted, following the Las Vegas shooting you would usually get a knock or a call if you left the DND on for usually more than a couple if nights.

  8. Ans Guest

    I always have the DND sign at the door.
    As soon as I m in the room I clean my nightstand- bathroom, all the things which are important to me and I do NOT want them to toucht my own pillow-
    Luckely the hotels in Europe do not have these discusting bedspreads but if there are bespreads I throw them in a closet.
    I pay housekeeping for not coming in my room-...

    I always have the DND sign at the door.
    As soon as I m in the room I clean my nightstand- bathroom, all the things which are important to me and I do NOT want them to toucht my own pillow-
    Luckely the hotels in Europe do not have these discusting bedspreads but if there are bespreads I throw them in a closet.
    I pay housekeeping for not coming in my room- in the morning if the cleaning crew is in the hallway I exchange my towels and empty the trashcan get TP and give them a big tip....

    I have seen them putting the clean comforter on the bench where you normally put your suitcases...... yak.

    If I need something I will call..

  9. glenn t Diamond

    Most houskeeping room attendants will decline to do your room with you present.
    Those who do will make a point of keeping the room door wide open.
    Same with maintenance people you may call to your room to fix something.
    All about personal safety.

  10. David Guest

    I can't believe no one has mentioned to excersize their option and request to have their bed spread changed? That is and always will be the grosses thing one can encounter in a motel room.

  11. Carrie Member

    I have a confession .... until I read this post and the comments to follow, I had never considered using the Do not Disturb function/sign as a matter of course. I take the view that I would rather have an interaction following a knock on the door than miss housekeeping (said as a parent who appreciates anyone offering to tidy and clean a room in which I find myself). It may be that I stay...

    I have a confession .... until I read this post and the comments to follow, I had never considered using the Do not Disturb function/sign as a matter of course. I take the view that I would rather have an interaction following a knock on the door than miss housekeeping (said as a parent who appreciates anyone offering to tidy and clean a room in which I find myself). It may be that I stay at hotels which exercise appropriate judgement (or they are intimidated by my imposing husband) but I have never had an inappropriate encounter and usually, a knock on the door brings either bubbles, clean laundry or a friendly face.

  12. Phillip Gold

    I think there are two points being made here.

    Firstly about not being disturbed, which I understand perfectly. If I want to be left alone and in peace then I’ll put the DND sign on.

    With regards to on demand housekeeping, I would feel selfish expecting someone to be available or drop what they’re doing to come and clean my room in the defined window I give them. When I’ve asked for it...

    I think there are two points being made here.

    Firstly about not being disturbed, which I understand perfectly. If I want to be left alone and in peace then I’ll put the DND sign on.

    With regards to on demand housekeeping, I would feel selfish expecting someone to be available or drop what they’re doing to come and clean my room in the defined window I give them. When I’ve asked for it once or twice, it never actually happened so I try and be helpful and put the housekeeping sign up when I leave the room. If housekeeping staff relied on all the guests telling them when to clean then that would be a mess of a job. I’m not saying don’t request it but the reason it works (if it does) is because it’s the exception not the rule. If I go to breakfast early, then I make a point of putting the housekeeping sign up because then that tells the staff they can start from there if they have no confirmed departures to do first.

  13. Greg Guest

    This is interesting as I always thought the do not disturb was if you wanted to sleep in but your use of it makes perfect sense, I think that I will start to use that approach.

    Another habit I have is making the bed before I leave as I have accidentally left things on the bed and misplaced them - like charging cables.

    Also I waste a little water and always flush the toilet on the way out just in case.

  14. Bonnie Guest

    I put it out as soon as I get there. It's the very first thing I do. If I'm traveling for work, it's usually my alone time. No kids, no mom duties. I don't want to be anxiously anticipating a knock on the door followed by awkward human interaction. If I'm leaving the room, I'll take it down. If it happens to get cleaned that's great, but I'm ok either way.

  15. Amy Guest

    We use the sign simply because I’ve been given the keys to someone else’s room before. Walking in with kids and luggage to see a man sitting on the bed was not an experience I want to repeat, especially not on the flip side.

  16. Malc Member

    @Lucky -- interesting post.

    It seems a lot of people, including me, were surprised by the turndown service. Perhaps you could write a post about that sometime,

  17. D3kingg Guest

    I always DND and don’t take service. If I have cash on me I leave a tip for housekeeping when I check out.

    There’s a certain kind of you know who out there I’m not allowed to say but they are cheap and don’t believe in tipping.

    1. Tom Guest

      I would suggest that few people tip in hotels, other than for food and drink as in any restaurant. If you carry your own bags and decline housekeeping, there is nobody to tip.

      And there is something annoying about hotel staff trying to impose themselves on you, hoping for a tip. The worst is hotels that staff the toilets in the public areas. I don't need someone to hand me a towel.

    2. Gail Guest

      What a selfish ass you are. I believe in sharing what little wealth I have. Do you think these people would be doing these types of jobs if they had the education & ability to do better.
      I hope you enjoy your selfish $

    3. Tom Guest

      Indiscriminate tipping is a big problem. Tipping should be for someone who goes out of their way to make a difference. And not for someone who merely does their job.

      I tip bar and restaurant staff. Housekeepng? No, because I prefer that they never enter my room, hence the use of the DND sign.

  18. L. Wexley Guest

    Turn down service?
    Really?
    You can't pull your own sheets down?

    Change the bed every day?
    Really?

    1. Andy Guest

      Chill buddy. Turn down service also includes refreshing the bathroom which is nice since it needs it after getting ready for dinner and a show. I like coming back to the room exhausted from the evening and seeing a tidy room, lights ready and soft music playing.

    2. Robert D Guest

      At a nice hotel, turndown service is much mote than pulling the sheets down

    3. Eskimo Guest

      It's rants like @L. Wexley and responses like @Andy or @Robert D that shows who have or have never stayed at luxury hotels.

    4. C. Wesley Guest

      I always stay in 5 star hotels and pay housekeeping to stay away.

      I can afford my own mints for my pillow and have cleaned up after myself since I was 8.

    5. Tom Guest

      Like what? A mint? Wasting energy by leaving lights and the TV on?

    6. Eskimo Guest

      TV on? LOL, I'm starting to enjoy this.
      You are probably right about wasting energy, but isn't most luxury stuff wasteful. But please do your part and stay in a 18 bunk hostel everywhere you go. I'd rather enjoy the turndown in my huge suite, a nice warm bubble bath and 2 TVs on!

      It's rants like @L. Wexley or @Tom and responses like @Andy or @Robert D that shows who have or have never stayed at luxury hotels.

    7. Tom Guest

      Om the contrary, I have stayed at the London Savoy, the Singapore Raffles and many other top hotels. I still don't want or need turndown.

      You confuse real luxury with the superficial trappings of luxury - quite common among the nouveau riche. Real class is understated, not gaudy and trite. I decline most extras in hotels because they are not structural to my stay. It's usually the semi-wealthy who think turndown is class.

      And getting...

      Om the contrary, I have stayed at the London Savoy, the Singapore Raffles and many other top hotels. I still don't want or need turndown.

      You confuse real luxury with the superficial trappings of luxury - quite common among the nouveau riche. Real class is understated, not gaudy and trite. I decline most extras in hotels because they are not structural to my stay. It's usually the semi-wealthy who think turndown is class.

      And getting back on topic, I do not want unnecessary entries into my room.

    8. David Guest

      @Tom I’d buy your bs if you didn’t also admit you really just want to cheap out on a small tip.

    9. Tom Guest

      David, I top where appropriate. What do you do?

    10. Tom Guest

      But it is interesting that you assume wealthy folks tip more. In my experience wealthy folks have a more nuanced appreciation of worth. They tip where appropriate but do not over-tip.

      Over-tipping is more the province of those who are only semi-rich but over-compensate for that by trying a little too hard. And of course tipping in a place like Japan or Australia is just plain tacky.

    11. Eskimo Guest

      You not wanting turndown has nothing to do with class. It's called preference.

      Wasteful has nothing to do with class. It's called preference.

      I, enjoying my amenities has nothing to do with class. It's called preference.

      You trying to link them with class, calling superficial, nouveau riche, semi-wealthy. You don't have class.
      You're just a narcissist who (claimed to have) stayed at the London Savoy (sic), the Singapore Raffles (sic) and many other top...

      You not wanting turndown has nothing to do with class. It's called preference.

      Wasteful has nothing to do with class. It's called preference.

      I, enjoying my amenities has nothing to do with class. It's called preference.

      You trying to link them with class, calling superficial, nouveau riche, semi-wealthy. You don't have class.
      You're just a narcissist who (claimed to have) stayed at the London Savoy (sic), the Singapore Raffles (sic) and many other top hotels. Just because you decline the service doesn't give you class either. Just another stroke for your ego thinking I planted a tree therefore I saved the environment from destruction.

      You do not want unnecessary entries into my room has nothing to do with class. It's called preference (and for you, an ego stroke)

      NB. I've never had any turndown that leaves the TV on, not at The Savoy, London. Not at The Raffles, Singapore.

      @David
      For many people, cheap out on a small tip means cheap 'out' and not about leaving small or large tip.
      For some who can link wasteful to class, they expand it to imply wealthy folks tip more.
      How can cheap out translate to wealthy folks tip more, that I cannot explain. But maybe stroking the ego a bit can explain.

      I do want to suggest to anyone who love people to stroke their ego, way over tip everywhere. It works magic for narcissists, even in Japan if you know how to.

    12. Tom Guest

      Wow, Eskimo, guess I hit a nerve there buddy.

      Oh, and look up what the term "sic" means. Hint: It is not what you think.

      Sorry, but turndown is a sop to those who aren't real travellers.

    13. Eskimo Guest

      Not a nerve, more like a sweet spot. Did I not say I'm starting to enjoy this?

      And for you, under your idea or logic, the term "sic" could mean anything. Maybe having no class, or nouveau riche, or fake travelers?

      Sorry, but real travellers? How much stroke you need?
      Maybe writing a blog about real vs fake travelers would help.

  19. Filip Guest

    I don’t really understand why you would need night turned down service

    1. D3kingg Guest

      @Filip

      Once in a blue moon if you’re at a 5 star hotel. Why not use the service ?

    2. Tom Guest

      Because it is near worthless and means extra foot traffic in your room.

      People who rarely stay in 5-star properties rate it. Those who stay their regularly don't bother.

  20. Matt Guest

    Ok. Admittedly, I am going to ask a provocative question. What is the point of turn down service really? Just the mint chocolates? I don’t mind it but it somehow seems so silly to me.

    1. Tom Guest

      There isn't really a point to turndown service any more. Decades ago it was a thing. But I can turn down my own bedding and don't eat confectionery items. I guess it makes some people feel "special" however, like they are living the high life.

      Also the less you use housekeeping the less you feel any need to tip. Unless I am staying 3 or more nights I won't use housekeeping. That said I don't bother with DND unless I really need quiet.

  21. Kelley Guest

    I always use the DND sign. I don't like to have strangers in "my space". If I need something I'll ask for it, but otherwise I'd prefer they stay out of my room while I'm there.

  22. You Guest

    Always put out the dnd sign. Daily housekeeping is rare. If I want towels call front desk

  23. David Crane Guest

    At 80 years old and still unceasingly traveling for business, I put on the DND only when I truly want it. Not at bedtime. I don’t want my cold dead body to be found two days later.

  24. Sean M. Diamond

    A former employer of mine had a policy that employees on business travel were not permitted to remain in the room while housekeeping (or maintenance or whatever) was also working in it. It came out of a painful settlement following accusations against one of our travelers once.

  25. Sunny Guest

    I travel for work, which means a different hotel and different location each week. I have always done the things that the writer describes. I describe myself as an introvert as well, and want as little do to with hotel staff as possible while staying there, except for an occasional cleaning.

  26. Constance Guest

    Have you addressed tipping of housekeeping staff in previous newsletters?

  27. AD Guest

    Has anyone noticed that post-pandemic, DND signs are pretty rare? Did a bunch of hotels take them out when they removed every other consumable item from the room.

    I'd say that 80% of my rooms don't have a DND sign, especially the three star ones that I stay in for work. If I really want one I have to call down and the hunt begins for one. Hotel staff always seem shocked that they aren't...

    Has anyone noticed that post-pandemic, DND signs are pretty rare? Did a bunch of hotels take them out when they removed every other consumable item from the room.

    I'd say that 80% of my rooms don't have a DND sign, especially the three star ones that I stay in for work. If I really want one I have to call down and the hunt begins for one. Hotel staff always seem shocked that they aren't there and will frequently try to get me to look at the door handle as I i don't know where to find it! Maybe they somehow believe that housekeepers are proactively replacing them. Personally, I've never seen a DND sign on a housekeeper's cart, not that I'm rifling their carts... but I do look when I walk by.

    1. Airfarer Diamond

      I've noticed that also. Good point.

  28. Petri Diamond

    I act pretty much just like Ben. The exceptions being the removal of the DND when I leave in the morning. In addition to which I let the hotel to know upon my arrival that I'll be having dinner every day from 8pm to 11pm, and they are free to do the turn down service that time. No need to call the housekeeping repeatedly. In the 1980's a friend of mine tipped by mistake a...

    I act pretty much just like Ben. The exceptions being the removal of the DND when I leave in the morning. In addition to which I let the hotel to know upon my arrival that I'll be having dinner every day from 8pm to 11pm, and they are free to do the turn down service that time. No need to call the housekeeping repeatedly. In the 1980's a friend of mine tipped by mistake a bellboy 100S in Intercontinental Zagreb. Despite the DND he was up practically all night. Every 15 minutes someone knocking on the door and asking: "Sir, would you need anything?"

  29. Austin New Member

    This is really helpful and similar to my approach, but I wasn't sure if I was missing any sort of normalities (esp when it comes to turn-down service). Thank you!

  30. Vistaro New Member

    Always put DND on the door, if you don’t then there’s someone at the door endlessly, take DND down when I’m out and the room gets cleaned, I’m convinced someone is constantly walking up and down the corridor checking when the DND goes away! Done this 25 years, spend at least 200 nights a year in hotels.

  31. K4 Guest

    Wow how introverted and privacy obsessed are you guys?
    I call housekeeping when I go down for breakfast. I don’t put DND on unless I’ve drunk a lot and don’t want to be woken up.
    What exactly you guys think housekeeping is going to do with your dirty underwear while you’re gone is bewildering.

    1. AA70 Gold

      Yeah until they walked in on me getting dressed without knocking. I heard sorry 15 times before the door shut and the front desk heard from a less than satisfied guest

    2. K4 Guest

      I tend to get dressed in the bathroom, or the dressing room, which isn't usually the first sight entering the room.
      Point taken though, I'm sure if you're consummating your marriage, you may also want the DND sign on!
      Just see it as weird to put it on if you're working, watching TV or having a drink on the balcony. There's no need.

  32. iv Guest

    I am totally with you on this. Don't come for me unless I call for you.

    1. Pam Guest

      Housekeeping rules have changed since covid. Some hotels still won’t do regular housekeeping unless asked. And as already noted, many properties have now done away with the hanging DND placards.

      The method that consistently works the best for me is tell the front desk at chk-in when you want the room serviced/turned-down each day. Sometimes they request that info anyway now if you want daily service. They’ll typically request a time range, more like...

      Housekeeping rules have changed since covid. Some hotels still won’t do regular housekeeping unless asked. And as already noted, many properties have now done away with the hanging DND placards.

      The method that consistently works the best for me is tell the front desk at chk-in when you want the room serviced/turned-down each day. Sometimes they request that info anyway now if you want daily service. They’ll typically request a time range, more like all morning or all afternoon.

      I personally don’t like the 24/7 DND practice because I sometimes need items delivered to my room (FedEx package; stored bags; room service; extra towels) & I will either forget I left the sign out (& food can get cold til they reach me by phone) or they won’t place an item in my room while I’m out. And then I might not see the item til the next day depending on staffing shortages (which are frequent).

      I think in this day & age both the property & the hotel guest have to be flexible on when services are received. It takes more planning than it used to for sure.

  33. Robert Guest

    I've loved the DND sign for as long as I can remember. I started heavy travel in the mid '90s and the first thing I do is put the hanger on the door

  34. World_Traveller New Member

    I absolutely hate the DND door hangers. Sometimes they're missing from the room. Other times they might be snatched (or even flipped to the make-up-the-room side) by fellow guests. This is where simple technology is a great improvement. Press a DND button in the room, and not only does it show the DND status outside the room, but the housekeeping staff's keycards will not work to open the door! Security staff can, of course, still...

    I absolutely hate the DND door hangers. Sometimes they're missing from the room. Other times they might be snatched (or even flipped to the make-up-the-room side) by fellow guests. This is where simple technology is a great improvement. Press a DND button in the room, and not only does it show the DND status outside the room, but the housekeeping staff's keycards will not work to open the door! Security staff can, of course, still override the DND. But it has to be a very dysfunctional hotel for that to occur when unnecessary.

  35. skimegheath Gold

    I can work from anywhere (mostly). As I result I sometimes work from hotels and am in my room all day and go out at night. I agree in advance what time I need my room cleaned each day. Once done I put on DND for the rest of the day. I never have turn down service. If I want my bin(trash) emptied. I call for it to be done.

  36. The Joe Guest

    Shortly after the Las Vegas shooting, wife and I were at the HR Miami for a few nights and left the DND out the whole time. On the second night, there's pounding at the door, identifying as hotel security. Through the peephole, I could see three burly men in suits. It freaked me out enough to call the front desk to verify before I opened the door. They confirmed it was their security. I opened...

    Shortly after the Las Vegas shooting, wife and I were at the HR Miami for a few nights and left the DND out the whole time. On the second night, there's pounding at the door, identifying as hotel security. Through the peephole, I could see three burly men in suits. It freaked me out enough to call the front desk to verify before I opened the door. They confirmed it was their security. I opened the door and they were simply there to check on us. OK, then!

    Fortunately hasn't happened again.

  37. Richard Guest

    I don't need more welcome amenities so no issue with the do not disturb sign the entire stay. I don't request clean towels for a 1-3 day visit so no issue with towels. The rooms are often upgrades with towels enough for four people so I don't generally bother on week long visits. I do travel with trash bags so I can contain the trash more appropriately. The trash cans in hotels are small and...

    I don't need more welcome amenities so no issue with the do not disturb sign the entire stay. I don't request clean towels for a 1-3 day visit so no issue with towels. The rooms are often upgrades with towels enough for four people so I don't generally bother on week long visits. I do travel with trash bags so I can contain the trash more appropriately. The trash cans in hotels are small and the trash bags in hotels aren't worth the effort. End of stay there is generally a pile of towels in the bathroom. Unless I can find an ideal location for the trash I generally leave the trash in the bathroom to limit staining carpet if the bag leaks. I really don't like it when people leave dirty towels in the hallway or trash bags in the hallway...

  38. globetrotter Guest

    I always keep the DND sign on at all times. I do not need daily room service. Before I check out, I pick up hair on bathroom floor, wipe down the mirror, put all soiled towels in the sink/ tub, and put all unused pillows in closet. I do not normally have food leftover in the room to avoid attracting pests. Many chain hotels no longer need as many housekeepers as they did prior to...

    I always keep the DND sign on at all times. I do not need daily room service. Before I check out, I pick up hair on bathroom floor, wipe down the mirror, put all soiled towels in the sink/ tub, and put all unused pillows in closet. I do not normally have food leftover in the room to avoid attracting pests. Many chain hotels no longer need as many housekeepers as they did prior to Covid. Housekeepers in Hawaii complained that hotels did not call them back to work and they have no income. Housekeepers at Hilton in DC earn $27/hr plus benefits--hotels are justified to cut jobs. Only union members in all trades earn such ridiculous wage plus benefits. But Congress members top the list earning $175K annually plus cadillac benefits and the power to write bills and pass laws without any job qualifications requirement.

  39. GBOAC Diamond

    I may not leave the DND sign out all the time, but I definitely put it out when I go out for short periods of time and don't want to secure my laptop and other personal items or put away other things before I want housekeeping to come in.
    But I like to have fresh towels every day -- that's a luxury I can't manage at home -- so while I may not request...

    I may not leave the DND sign out all the time, but I definitely put it out when I go out for short periods of time and don't want to secure my laptop and other personal items or put away other things before I want housekeeping to come in.
    But I like to have fresh towels every day -- that's a luxury I can't manage at home -- so while I may not request housekeeping to clean the entire room, I will ask for fresh towels to be brought up.
    (And please spare any lecturing about how I'm destroying the environment)

  40. chris w Guest

    Yeah. Same I put DND on always. And I do not request housekeeping daily. Sometimes just for a towel if needed. The 4th day to clean. I make no mess. Plus what I put I want to stay at that place.

    But DND few days ago didnt mean anything for a hotel. In 2 days they came in three times WITHOUT knocking even. I left the hotel angry.

  41. Eskimo Guest

    A blog that was 'allegedly' banned from Bali recently for exaggeration loves to bait housekeeper with Do Not Disturb. Any knock is a points+cash jackpot from the GM.

  42. Jess Guest

    This is going to come out very cynical, but it's what I do. I've had many times as an airline crew where I do as in the article and I immediately put the do not disturb sign on the door, (especially after an all nighter when I want to sleep the day after) and then someone in another room steals it because their DND sign is missing. I now always put a mark on it...

    This is going to come out very cynical, but it's what I do. I've had many times as an airline crew where I do as in the article and I immediately put the do not disturb sign on the door, (especially after an all nighter when I want to sleep the day after) and then someone in another room steals it because their DND sign is missing. I now always put a mark on it so I know who takes it (it's usually someone close to my room). It might deter some from taking it, but at least I can find it if it goes missing.
    Why people can't just call down and ask for one instead of taking someone else's is beyond me.

    1. Beachfan Guest

      What’s wrong with the lock on the door you flip over?

      I want housekeeping and turndown both. They can’t come in with the lock on, I just say come back at later if they try.

      Easy peasy.

    2. Phillip Gold

      Because you don’t want someone knocking and waking you up when you’re in need of sleep? As Jess said above.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

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David Crane Guest

At 80 years old and still unceasingly traveling for business, I put on the DND only when I truly want it. Not at bedtime. I don’t want my cold dead body to be found two days later.

4
Robert D Guest

At a nice hotel, turndown service is much mote than pulling the sheets down

3
Andy Guest

Chill buddy. Turn down service also includes refreshing the bathroom which is nice since it needs it after getting ready for dinner and a show. I like coming back to the room exhausted from the evening and seeing a tidy room, lights ready and soft music playing.

3
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