8 Good Credit Cards With Little Or No Minimum Spend

Filed Under: Advice, Bank of America
In the interest of full disclosure, OMAAT earns a referral bonus for anyone that’s approved through some of the below links. The information and associated card details on this page for the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® Card, The Platinum Card from American Express, and JetBlue Plus cards have been collected independently by OMAAT and has not been reviewed or provided by the card issuer. These are the best publicly available offers (terms apply) that we have found for each product or service. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone, not those of the bank, credit card issuer, airline, hotel chain, or product manufacturer/service provider, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Please check out our advertiser policy for further details about our partners, and thanks for your support! The offer for the Avianca Vuela Visa® Card has expired. Learn more about the current offers here.

I’m currently working on meeting the minimum spend on The Platinum Card® from American Express, and I’m still about a month away from hitting the $5,000 mark, after which I expect to get 60,000 American Express Membership Rewards points.

The Amex Platinum has the highest minimum spend of any card I’ve applied for all year, and I specifically planned to apply toward the end of the year so holiday expenses could help me reach $5,000 in spend relatively quickly.

Meanwhile, I’ve been considering what other cards I might want to apply for while I’m trying to meet the Amex’s minimum. It’d have to be a card that doesn’t have a large minimum spend requirement of its own.

I’m sure others sometimes find themselves wondering how to juggle budgets with minimum spends, so here are a few decent options that might fit the bill (pun intended):

JetBlue Plus Card

I’ve been meaning to pick this card up for a while. The JetBlue Plus Card offers 40,000 TrueBlue points after $1,000 spend in the first 90 days and pay the associated annual fee. The card also has no foreign transaction fees and offers a 10% rebate on points every time you redeem them for a flight. It also is a “chip + pin” card, which makes it extra easy to use abroad.

If you live in or near a city where JetBlue has a hub (like New York, Boston, Ft. Lauderdale, etc.), I’d definitely recommend applying for this card. It has a $99 annual fee.

You can redeem TrueBlue points for flights on JetBlue’s Mint business class

IHG® Rewards Club Premier Credit Card

I already have this card, otherwise, it’d be a no-brainer. Getting a free night at any IHG hotel costing 40,000 points or less every year you have the card is a steal.

Better yet, the annual fee is $0 Introductory Annual Fee for the first year, thereafter $89. If you don’t already have this card, you should consider picking it up with this best ever welcome bonus.

Avianca Vuela Visa® Card

The great thing about this card from Banco Popular is that there is no minimum spend – you get the 40,000 LifeMiles bonus after your first purchase. LifeMiles are one of the most lucrative points currencies for Star Alliance premium cabin redemptions. The annual fee is $149, not waived the first year.

AAdvantage Aviator Red Card

This card is just like the Vuela Visa in two ways:

  1. It has an alliterative name
  2. It requires no minimum spend: you get 60,000 bonus miles after you make your first purchase and pay the annual fee ($95)

Sometimes it can be tricky to find a good redemption option for AAdvantage miles, but they certainly do exist (more often on partners than on AA itself).

It also gives you 10% of your redeemed miles back (up to 10,000 miles per year), effectively reducing the cost of award tickets.

Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® Card

Alaska’s huge list of global airline partners means that their miles can be used to travel just about anywhere, and there are a lot of good redemptions to be had.

You get 40,000 Alaska Mileage Plan miles + a $100 statement credit + a companion pass after spending $2,000 in the first 90 days, making this a fairly attainable bonus.

I get a lot of value out of the companion pass that comes with this card. The Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Card is issued by Bank of America and has a $75 annual fee, which is not waived in the first year.

A one-way flight in business class on Hainan Airlines from the U.S. to Asia is just 50,000 Alaska miles.

Delta SkyMiles® Blue American Express Card

This card has no annual fee (Rates & Fees). It offers 10,000 Delta SkyMiles after $500 in spend in the first three months.

Believe it or not, that’s enough for a free short-haul flight. (Flights between San Francisco and Los Angeles, or between D.C. and New York, for example, can be as low as 5,500 SkyMiles each way.)

You earn 2 miles per dollar spent at restaurants worldwide, 2 miles per dollar spent on Delta purchases, and one mile per dollar spent on everything else.

This may not be the most lucrative card in terms of benefits and welcome bonus, but it’s got a low minimum spend and may be worth picking up for some extra SkyMiles if you have a use for them.

Chase Freedom Unlimited®

This no-annual-fee card offers unlimited 1.5% cash back on all purchases.

Ben has written many times about the benefits of using this card in conjunction with the Chase Sapphire Preferred or Chase Sapphire Reserve card, which can be a simple but effective strategy for acquiring points.

Of course, this card, as well as the Chase Sapphire Reserve and Chase Sapphire Preferred, are subject to the 5/24 rule, meaning if you’ve opened 5 or more new card accounts in the past 24 months from any bank you likely won’t be approved.

Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card

Here’s another no-annual-fee card that gives you 20,000 Capital One miles after $1,000 in purchases during the first 3 months of account opening.

Capital One miles can’t be transferred to airlines and other partners (unlike the points you’d earn on many Chase, American Express, and Citi cards), but 20,000 miles has a value of $200.

You probably won’t be using this card to fly international first class on a five-star airline, but it can help offset some of the costs of your next vacation. You earn 1.25 miles on every purchase.

Bottom line

These cards have attainable minimum spend requirements and offer some good benefits. Personally, I’ll probably go with the JetBlue card, because I fly them often and those 30,000 points will pay for a couple flights. Also, I don’t currently have a “chip + pin” card (you stick out like a sore thumb in Europe if you’re using chip + sign, and chip + pin is required at many automated kiosks for buying train tickets and other important stuff).

If you have a favorite card that I’ve left out, feel free to mention it!

The following links will direct you to the rates and fees for mentioned American Express Cards. These include: Delta SkyMiles® Blue American Express Card (Rates & Fees).

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Comments
  1. Andrew –
    DoctorOfCredit has a link for the same JetBlue card with a 60,000 bonus and same spend minimum
    LifeMiles discontinued the promo code field and as far as I can tell – there is no place in the application to enter it. Please correct me if I am wrong.

  2. Luck wrote, “9 Good Credit Cards With Little Or No Minimum Spend”

    Here, I’ll fix that for you:
    “9 Good Credit Cards With Little Or No Minimum Spending Requirement”

  3. So you write for one of the most prolific travel/credit card blogs, but bit on a 60k offer for $5k when most of us got 100k for $3k? I hope the affiliate money makes up for the difference…

  4. Pretty slimy to link (via referral) to the JB offer when 60k is the public offer.

    Nice that you didn’t do the same with Aviator Red – direct link.

  5. Surprised you didn’t mention the Uber card. the sign-up bonus is only $100, but the minimum spend requirement is $500.

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