Netflix’s Damning Boeing 737 Documentary

Netflix’s Damning Boeing 737 Documentary

78

I just watched the new Netflix documentary about the Boeing 737 MAX, and my gosh…

“Downfall: The Case Against Boeing” now on Netflix

A new aviation documentary recently started streaming on Netflix, called “Downfall: The Case Against Boeing.” You can see a trailer for it below.

The roughly 90 minute documentary is directed by Rory Kennedy. It provides background on the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 MAX crashes that eventually caused the plane to be grounded globally. It also interviews aviation experts, pilots, former Boeing employees, families of the crash victims (even the wife of the Lion Air 610 captain), and Representative Peter DeFazio, who headed up the congressional investigation into the Boeing 737 MAX.

If you haven’t seen this documentary, I’d highly recommend watching it.

My take on the Boeing 737 MAX documentary

First of all, this documentary is incredibly well done. It’s both concise and thorough. Even if you had never heard of the Boeing 737 MAX, you’d be totally up to speed by the time that you’re done watching this. Those who closely followed the events that occurred with the Boeing 737 MAX will appreciate how well this summarizes the events, and the interviews really add some valuable context to the situation.

This documentary is damning beyond words when it comes to Boeing’s reputation. Even though I was familiar with just about all of the individual details presented in this documentary, watching this made me angry all over again.

The documentary does a great job not just talking about the current state of Boeing, but also talking about how Boeing’s culture has shifted over time, especially following the 1997 merger with McDonnell Douglas.

As is unfortunately the case with so many companies, Boeing’s only focus seemed to be on profits, and more accurately, short term stock price. Watching this documentary almost makes me never want to fly a Boeing aircraft again on principle (which I’m of course not going to do, but…).

If I had one criticism of the documentary, it’s that I don’t think it does enough to address the FAA’s role in all of this. Yes, Boeing withheld information from the FAA, but why was a regulatory agency essentially operating on an honor system for something this important?

Bottom line

There’s a new Netflix documentary about the Boeing 737 MAX, and it’s both fascinating and infuriating. Whether you’re an aviation geek or just like investigative-style shows, I’d highly recommend watching this. Just try to keep your blood pressure under control, because you may be furious by the time that it’s done.

If you watched this Boeing 737 MAX documentary, what did you think of it, and what was your takeaway?

Conversations (78)
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  1. rick Guest

    lipstick on a pig is still a pig, We don,t learn read about the Dc-10 fiasco of the 70,s The similarities are shocking.

  2. john christmas Guest

    Boeing had everyone in its pocket. The FAA and the government. Corporate America is about the dollar-people don't matter, the bottom line does. A good Aircraft, with a good reputation after 50 years of flying, was the companies cheap way to catch up with the A320. Threw two big engines onto an 50 year old design and tried to compensate by using electronics, and to save even more money, only one electronic component.
    My...

    Boeing had everyone in its pocket. The FAA and the government. Corporate America is about the dollar-people don't matter, the bottom line does. A good Aircraft, with a good reputation after 50 years of flying, was the companies cheap way to catch up with the A320. Threw two big engines onto an 50 year old design and tried to compensate by using electronics, and to save even more money, only one electronic component.
    My RAGE stems from the two CEO'S culpable, walked away with over 60million dollars in front of all the relatives of the dead people. The shear arrogance of Corporate America- they should have got the death penalty 300 times over.
    if for no other reason, to show America cared, and as warning to the rest of "Corporate America" where they stood. None of this happened. Many Airlines bought the "repaired"737max on the cheap, there is a least one, that changed the aircrafts name, so that passengers would not know. There is now, a travel agent, who make sure, that non of your flights contain the 737max. What does that tell you?

  3. ken Guest

    similar documentary was done a while ago, and it is kinda unbelievable https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdYcJldzOdw

  4. Lydia Guest

    It must be devastated for families of the deceased to go through, praying for all of them. Is beyond angry to know Boeing just gave a fine and no one go to jail for this! This make me rethink the system….. Bravo to China to ground the plane first, which created a domino effect and play an important role to grounded all the 737 max.

  5. Mark Guest

    By pausing the film when memos were shown, I found the name of the lead flight test engineer who emphasized the need to maintain the "no new training" facade. His name is Mark Forkner and his trial is scheduled to begin next month: https://dfw.cbslocal.com/2022/02/08/charges-dropped-former-boeing-737-max-chief-technical-pilot-mark-forkner/
    The company paid a fine to avoid further criminal prosecution. Does anyone know the status of any suits brought by victims' families?

    By pausing the film when memos were shown, I found the name of the lead flight test engineer who emphasized the need to maintain the "no new training" facade. His name is Mark Forkner and his trial is scheduled to begin next month: https://dfw.cbslocal.com/2022/02/08/charges-dropped-former-boeing-737-max-chief-technical-pilot-mark-forkner/
    The company paid a fine to avoid further criminal prosecution. Does anyone know the status of any suits brought by victims' families?

    1. Mons Guest

      From what I read the settlement was in response to the suits brought by victims' families. $500 million form the settlement was kept aside for the families. Victims' families have now lawyered up to fight against this decision. They are claiming that the crime-victims law was violated because they were not told anything about this settlement. However, the justice department is claiming that this was not a crime.

  6. paul byrne Guest

    I felt the same, that they could have delved more into the Boeing-FAA relationship and how Boeing was self to self-certify. I also would have liked more insights into the CEO and the Boeing board and their background as the finger was pointed at them for growing shareholder value.

  7. Andrew Guest

    No he would like to fly in a plane built by people who value human life more than a quick buck.

  8. Frank Guest

    The Netflix documentary was an insightful look into the many flaws that evolved within Boeing and the FAA to lead to the tragic accidents. Another potential contributor to those flaws was overlooked - the US airlines. Some have considerable influence over Boeing by having set expectations to minimize training or risk losing purchase deals to another manufacturer. The Max buyers aren't culpable but they had a part to play by demanding minimal differences training.

  9. Barry Guest

    I meant to write allowing hundreds of people to die.

  10. Barry Guest

    Someone should have gone to jail for intentionally withholding information from the pilots and FAA and allowing hundreds of people to know. They even estimated 15 crashes of the plane. It’s so wrong that they just paid a fine and nobody was imprisoned for it.

  11. Sunit Guest

    What I though find missing in the documentary is the fact that how on earth the FAA got to ceritfy this aircraft to be fly-worthy? Had read in some other reports that FAA is/was having some of the retired Boeing employees in its ranks, no wonder then there was collusion. Wouldn't be surprised if thas the case, there had to be some sort of corrupt practices involved in getting to push this aircraft through ceritfication....

    What I though find missing in the documentary is the fact that how on earth the FAA got to ceritfy this aircraft to be fly-worthy? Had read in some other reports that FAA is/was having some of the retired Boeing employees in its ranks, no wonder then there was collusion. Wouldn't be surprised if thas the case, there had to be some sort of corrupt practices involved in getting to push this aircraft through ceritfication. Fail to understand that from a safety perspective, how come FAA had no inkling to any of the issues discussed in there and they just passed the certification. Were there no tests done prior? How come flight control issues "suddenly" appear on commercial flights? Lots os questions still unanswered I believe.

  12. Alex Guest

    From today flying on Airbus exclusively.

  13. Steve Guest

    The first pilot (first crash) was not even told there was an MCAS system on the plane, nor its purpose.

    The second pilot turned it off when it went haywire, but, it was too late. The second airline (LionAir) asked for pilot training from Boeing and Boeing called them stupid.

    Some should have gone to jail for this.

  14. Jared Guest

    Enjoyed the documentary and the demise in reputation of a greedy unethical organization. A perfect ending would have been the public hanging of the Boeing execs and the FAA authorities.

  15. Gary Guest

    I was taken back with the disregard of human life vs profit. I have worked at a few companies that stated 'customer and quaity first' but it was really profit first.
    Hopefully, the problems with the management and oversight have been corrected. Not until a tragic event(s), things like this don't change for the better.

  16. Jasper Guest

    A system to automatically control the horizontal stabilizer, or pitch of the aircraft had nothing to do with making the aircraft safer or more efficient, rather, was a band-aid approach to the issue of putting new engines on old planes not designed for them as an offering to the god of greed on the altar of compromised engineering by corporate executives. 10 seconds to make a life or death decision about a system for which...

    A system to automatically control the horizontal stabilizer, or pitch of the aircraft had nothing to do with making the aircraft safer or more efficient, rather, was a band-aid approach to the issue of putting new engines on old planes not designed for them as an offering to the god of greed on the altar of compromised engineering by corporate executives. 10 seconds to make a life or death decision about a system for which no training was provided? Really? No, the system was installed toward a deliberate catastrophe - someone didn't want these planes to fly. We need to acknowledge the elephant in the room - the interests of the fossil fuel industry.

  17. Michael Woods Guest

    Wall Street ultimately rewards sociopathic behaviour and this documentary makes that very evident. The executives in charge committed criminal negligence and should be in jail for life.

    1. John Shepherd Guest

      Absolutely right Michael

    2. Punivai Guest

      When a young person robs the corner Dairy for a packet of cigarettes, they make headline news and eventually punished by the Courts.
      Here you have a Chief Exec hiding behind a title, plainly avoiding the lives lost as consequence of his authority, walks away with a $62m payment. How does that work?

  18. Smit Guest

    While I appreciate how thorough the documentary was in regards to Boeing, they ignored the FAA's complicity in this tradedgy.

  19. Anthony Joseph Guest

    As an engineer who has worked on fail safe electronics, I am still shocked as to why the 737 max is still allowed to fly. Secondly, there should be criminal prosecutions of Boeing executives and their "well greased" FAA compatriots.
    1. The 737 Max was a cheap way to respond to the A321 Neo but the design of the MAX engine placement (further forward due to size) for larger engine to meet flight range...

    As an engineer who has worked on fail safe electronics, I am still shocked as to why the 737 max is still allowed to fly. Secondly, there should be criminal prosecutions of Boeing executives and their "well greased" FAA compatriots.
    1. The 737 Max was a cheap way to respond to the A321 Neo but the design of the MAX engine placement (further forward due to size) for larger engine to meet flight range competitiveness led to the issue of higher probability of stalling during takeoff. So they band aided this is issue with MCAS but without providing a simple way for pilot to disable MCAS in case of malfunction. This was done to counter the Airbus claim that no additional pilot training was needed to switch from flying A321 to A321 Neo.
    But what was most egregious was the criminal decisions overriding Boeing safety experts on not having redundant AOA sensors for the MCAS system. Multiple AOA sensors were listed as an optional item for the 737 MAX.
    Both crashes of the 737 MAX were attributed to the single AOA sensor malfunctioning, thus causing the MCAS software to send incorrect directions to Autopilot system.

    What is also criminal is that test pilots at Boeing reported these safety issues, but nothing was done to further beef up MCAS testing scenarios. I also believe that MCAS is seriously flawed because of the amount of time it took to get the 737 MAX re-certified.
    As a frequent flyer I am loathe to fly the 737 MAX, particularly operated by non-US carriers because of my ongoing concerns with pilot competence and discipline in maintaining manual flying skills.
    I do believe in automation to ease the workload of pilots but with aircraft manufacturers thoroughness and transparency in avionics testing and quality.

  20. RetiredATLATC Diamond

    They don't call the FAA the tombstone agency for nothing.

  21. Ira Rubinson Guest

    Since there were no crashes in the US, it makes me wonder if US pilots were somehow privy to MCATS info. I also heard that the night before the Lion Air crash, the same aircraft started behaving the same way and a cabin crew member knew to and how to disengage the system and did so quickly. He was not flying the plane but was in the cabin in some other capacity or as a passenger.

    1. Teresa Guest

      From what I understand, the third person in the cabin was another pilot and he noticed the trim wheel spinning.
      The problem was corrected, but the correction used was for a different problem associated with the trim. Also, the captain
      did not report the problem when they arrived at their destination. If he had...

  22. ycgcdg New Member

    I watched the documentary last night, just saw your post this morning. I totally agree with you. It is so sad and I too believe the FAA should never let BA self certify. That really needs to be addressed. My heart broke for all the victims and the families again. A needless tragedy. I believe some people should have been criminally charged.

  23. Eric Guest

    Yes, I would rather fly on a communist built plane.

    1. Frank Guest

      ...I guess you never heard of Airbus, huh?

    2. axck Guest

      The company that’s beaten Boeing in orders and deliveries the last 3 years? He must not be an aviation guy.

  24. João Correa Guest

    Good documentary, missed more details about what exactly measures took in place by Boeing to recover all mess during those 2 years Max planes on ground, software fixed? What else? What about pilots trainning, it was improved? did they take flight simulator sessions?
    so, how safer fly 737 Max now?

  25. Sky Maverick Guest

    To understand why FAA did not review the MCAS system and delegated the review of the "minor" system to Boeing, why MCAS was deliberately taken out of all use manuals and more in depth details watch the PBS special. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/boeings-fatal-flaw/

    It will probably infuriate you even more.

  26. John Shepherd Guest

    Not enough questions have been asked of Boeing's Board of Directors and its corporate governance. The following brief article I wrote on Kellner and Schwab may be of interest, because whilst they were messing up at Boeing they were also messing up at Marriott. Kellner, of course, is now Chairman of the Board at Boeing though in May 2022 he will be stepping down from Marriott:
    MARRIOTT LAMENTATIONS 55: "Kellner and Schwab, Marriott and...

    Not enough questions have been asked of Boeing's Board of Directors and its corporate governance. The following brief article I wrote on Kellner and Schwab may be of interest, because whilst they were messing up at Boeing they were also messing up at Marriott. Kellner, of course, is now Chairman of the Board at Boeing though in May 2022 he will be stepping down from Marriott:
    MARRIOTT LAMENTATIONS 55: "Kellner and Schwab, Marriott and Boeing - Peas in a Pod"​
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/marriott-lamentations-55-kellner-schwab-boeing-peas-john-shepherd/?published=t

    1. GUWonder Guest

      Board of Directors of many a publicly-traded company are mostly just a rubber stamp, cozy assignment. Rocking the boat isn’t what typical directors on the BOD do. They are where they are mostly because of their relationships and/or who do they represent. Rocking the boat risks jeopardizing the relationship that gets them or keeps them on the Boards. And so they don’t.

      And BODs going into a major merger/acquisition and coming out of one tend...

      Board of Directors of many a publicly-traded company are mostly just a rubber stamp, cozy assignment. Rocking the boat isn’t what typical directors on the BOD do. They are where they are mostly because of their relationships and/or who do they represent. Rocking the boat risks jeopardizing the relationship that gets them or keeps them on the Boards. And so they don’t.

      And BODs going into a major merger/acquisition and coming out of one tend to be even worse than usual.

  27. Jack Hopkins Guest

    I am just finishing Peter Robison's book, Flying Blind, the 737 Tragedy and the fall of Boeing. How a great company producing wonderful airplanes fell to lure of Wall Street. Jack Welch, ceo of General Electric is the model you want for your company. Please. Robison follows the Boeing decline that took place after Boeing bought Mc Donnell- Douglas. Boeing became profit first share price and cost reduction next.
    About the airplane, the 737...

    I am just finishing Peter Robison's book, Flying Blind, the 737 Tragedy and the fall of Boeing. How a great company producing wonderful airplanes fell to lure of Wall Street. Jack Welch, ceo of General Electric is the model you want for your company. Please. Robison follows the Boeing decline that took place after Boeing bought Mc Donnell- Douglas. Boeing became profit first share price and cost reduction next.
    About the airplane, the 737 Max. Obviously Boeing is responsible for proper ops manuels and check lists and training requirements. It appears they left out a few things.
    I have 28 years flying jet aircraft and received I think the best training. And I have type ratings on the 757,767,747 Boeing airplanes. A couple of things covered from the start: runaway stabilizer, jet upset. Why? because you could lose control of
    airplane in a hurry. In both cases you manually maintain a level attitude while setting the power to maintain that fight condition. Mcas or no Mcas. You don't go nose down and NOT pull the throttles back. I'm not being critical of the pilots in this case. If there is blame, blame the companies who put pilots in their aircraft not properly trained.

  28. Jorge Paez Guest

    In a world where Bush junior let chicken processing plants "self inspect" and where
    the rich and corporations have bought out the politicians (even Obama sold his soul) you are surprised?
    One credit card at a time.....

  29. Morgan Diamond

    Just watched it then, absolutely horrified, obviously can't stop flying on Boeing planes but when there is an equal alternative I sure as hell will be picking that. And if I was the CEO of an airline I would cancel all Boeing orders and order planes from Airbus and the likes.

  30. Alan Gold

    Much like the FDA the FAA is in bed with the companies it is supposed to oversee. At least Boeing does not have a waiver of liability.

    1. John Shepherd Guest

      Absolutely Alan. And this is proving to be the case right across the board. Regulators either literally in bed with companies or at the very least only reactive in a job that should be proactive. As has been asked many times, who regulates the regulators?

    2. GUWonder Guest

      Regulatory capture. And just check out the revolving door between the government and the private sector. There is money to be made in playing this game.

  31. LovetoFly Member

    That was a pretty good documentary. There have been quite a few lately-the Challenger documentary on Netflix was well done as well.....

  32. Jack Guest

    Check out also 'The Boeing 787: Broken Dreams' by Al Jazeera on YouTube.

  33. Another Lump Guest

    Queue the slander lawsuits. Netflix will soon be a subsidiary of Boeing.

    1. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      Ridiculous. There's an easy affirmative defense against a slander indictment, and that's truth/accuracy. So much of the details of Boeing's lax approach to building the 737MAX are public, that a 1st year practitioner could get a slander suit thrown out: it would never make it past summary judgment.

  34. dvdjqt New Member

    Ben, All - Have you read the recently-published book "Flying Blind: The 737 MAX Tragedy and the Fall of Boeing". It provides such a good explanation about what happened within Boeing (i.e., change of corporate culture) that led to their producing an aircraft that was less than perfect (to put it mildly). This made me so angry all over again, as well.

  35. Musen Sugoi Guest

    The story here is really much simpler. The reliance on a single sensor was a design flaw that created a single point of failure and broke fundamental engineering principles. With two sensors, MCAS realizes that it is receiving erroneous inputs, does not engage, so you have no problem.

    The narrative about Boeing putting profits over lives is headline-grabbing, but not really accurate. The problem is more about arrogance that led to laziness.

    1. Jack Guest

      When you also look into 787 documentary, it was very direct that cutting cost and putting airplane to low tax and cheap labor state to build where they don't have enough experienced employee. Those airplanes can be just ticking b flying every single day.

  36. Ron Guest

    The documentary was good and I enjoyed it. It is slightly one sided though. As some mentioned, it fails to completely address the role of the FAA in the crash.

    Also, I completely believe Boeing was at fault for the accident. However, pilot error was a contributing factor.

    Boeing tried to fault the pilots as the sole cause. That is not true. But to completely strip the pilots of making any mistakes (as the...

    The documentary was good and I enjoyed it. It is slightly one sided though. As some mentioned, it fails to completely address the role of the FAA in the crash.

    Also, I completely believe Boeing was at fault for the accident. However, pilot error was a contributing factor.

    Boeing tried to fault the pilots as the sole cause. That is not true. But to completely strip the pilots of making any mistakes (as the documentary does) is completely false. For example, when they reenact the Ethiopian crash they show the FO engaging the stab cutoff switches and then say he did the right thing and the plane still crashed. That leaves out so much. The pilots incorrectly left the throttles at takeoff power in a nose down attitude which contributed to the difficulty in manually relieving trim pressure. The pilots then turned the cutoff switches back off which engaged MCAS again.

    Not saying the pilots are completely to blame but saying/implying they made no mistakes and then clearly leaving out mistakes in the documentary is pretty bad for what is supposed to be an accurate documentary.

    Anyways glad the documentary sheds light on the recent culture that was developed at Boeing and hopefully helps lead to change

    1. Sean M. Diamond

      I don't think they explicitly said that the pilots didn't make mistakes, but rather that the pilots did what they were supposed to do. The training for such a situation did not adequately capture the necessary procedures (such as to reduce thrust) and therefore in an emergency situation it is quite understandable why the crew failed to do so. The real failing of the Max program was not the MCAS itself (which was a system...

      I don't think they explicitly said that the pilots didn't make mistakes, but rather that the pilots did what they were supposed to do. The training for such a situation did not adequately capture the necessary procedures (such as to reduce thrust) and therefore in an emergency situation it is quite understandable why the crew failed to do so. The real failing of the Max program was not the MCAS itself (which was a system that was designed to make the aircraft safer) but rather the push to bury the MCAS and other features into the footnotes in order to reduce the amount of differences training needed. If the Max had a different type rating from the NG, the entire point of marketing it to compete against the NEO would have been defeated.

      Personally, I do believe that a crew more aware of the situation they were placed in could have indeed reduced thrust and possibly saved the ET aircraft, but the fact remains that the systems and simulator training prescribed by Boeing that they were given did not train this. Therefore they did not make an "error".

  37. Yanna Guest

    I will surely check the aircraft producer while purchasing ticket, no Boeing please.

  38. Diego New Member

    Watching now and it’s incredibly distressful.

  39. Mark Guest

    What is one of the main purpose of government? It is to protect it’s citizens. Corporations are inherently profit driven. Would the medical or food industry self regulate? I blame the FAA as much as Boeing. They have had historically had greater scrutiny of airlines. The 737 max is nothing like the 737. And therefore should have been regulated as a totally new aircraft with appropriate increased oversight. Hope your mom is well. Prayers for her health.

    1. Alonzo Guest

      Are we going to pretend that the FDA is not a joke too? Not saying the FAA is squeaky clean, but they have way fewer deaths on their record than the FDA.

    2. Mark Guest

      At one point the FDA cared and was thorough, now just a shill for Big Pharma. FAA works for Boeing. Defense Dept for Raytheon and Lockheed. Once politicians and political appointees cannot lateral shift to the regulatory agencies, then we might (doubtful) see regulatory reform. Until then be careful.

  40. Randy Gold

    Regardless, the 737 Max is flying again. I avoided it for a while, but have flown it several times on AA the best 6 months. I don't think most people know they are on the Max. AA changed the safety card so it only says 737 (used to say 737 Max).

    Overall - doesn't seem any different flying, maybe slightly quieter and maybe slightly different take off characteristics.

    For Boeing thought, it would...

    Regardless, the 737 Max is flying again. I avoided it for a while, but have flown it several times on AA the best 6 months. I don't think most people know they are on the Max. AA changed the safety card so it only says 737 (used to say 737 Max).

    Overall - doesn't seem any different flying, maybe slightly quieter and maybe slightly different take off characteristics.

    For Boeing thought, it would only take one more crash (regardless of reason) to create another PR situation.

  41. Bruce Guest

    It’s all good and well that we make a documentary about it but Boeing executives still got bonuses at the end of that year and the board members directly responsible for the cover up did not get indicted for obstruction of justice. No one has been charged with a crime. None of them are in prison. The justice system again has failed, as it always does with rich individuals or companies. Why? Because the lobbies...

    It’s all good and well that we make a documentary about it but Boeing executives still got bonuses at the end of that year and the board members directly responsible for the cover up did not get indicted for obstruction of justice. No one has been charged with a crime. None of them are in prison. The justice system again has failed, as it always does with rich individuals or companies. Why? Because the lobbies are too strong. Why? Because capitalism. We need to fight. We need to protest. We need to take action since our institutions are not working for us. WAKE UP. WAKE. UP.

    1. Shutterbug Member

      Obviously the system works. Managers will get their golden parachutes and bonuses. Nobody will do time. It’s an institutionalized disgrace which will not change as long as lawmakers are dependent on campaign contributions by big corporations.

    2. GUWonder Guest

      Criminal charge related to Boeing’s fraud against the FAA came with a headline fine of $2.5 billion:

      https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/boeing-charged-737-max-fraud-conspiracy-and-agrees-pay-over-25-billion

      How much of the $2.5 billion headline settlement figure ended up as money sent to the US Government?

    3. Adam Simmons Guest

      I'm sure that the other people in this group are awake, thank you, without need for a human alarm clock.

      The alternatives to capitalism produced 'runaway successes' like Tupelovs; I don't think anything more needs to be said.

  42. Bruce Guest

    All these documentaries that are critical of corporations and nobody seems to make the connection between that and our rigged capitalist system… the anti-communist brainwashing is just too strong.

    1. Azamaraal Diamond

      Why do you think Aeroflot flies Boeing? Do you even remember the Ilyushin series or aircraft and their crash rate? Fly an Ilyushin 82 one day.

      I flew Aeroflot in the old days (80's) and am sincerely glad to have survived.

    2. red_robbo Guest

      An Ilyushin 82? I don't think anyone has ever flown on one of them!
      Perhaps you mean Il-62 or Il-86?

  43. Sean M. Diamond

    I enjoyed the documentary but it was enormously one sided. It certainly tells a good story but not the entire story, which would also wind up damning the FAA rather than painting the regulator as another victim "defrauded" by Boeing.

  44. Alonzo Guest

    I understand how this is educational, but besides that, what does watching this accomplish? It's not like we can boycott flying Boeing...

    1. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      Who's "we"...? Depending on where you are, and how much effort you wish to put into it, it's very feasible to avoid Boeing.

      Say you live in NYC or BOS and your carrier to choice is B6. Easily done.
      Or you live in LAX or SEA and your carrier of choice is DL? Same.
      Bit more difficult if you're stuck in DAL/DFW, but point remains.

  45. PresRDC Member

    Yawn. Rory is behind the times. Frontline already did a documentary on this late last year and Peter Robinson released an excellent book on the matter this past November.

  46. Anne Sohns Guest

    Muilenberg got 62 million dollars when he left Boing.

    Money over lifes.
    Criminals.

  47. Tim Dunn Diamond

    The real risk is probably less to Boeing than it is to airlines that operate the MAX now that MAX deliveries have increased and there are fairly large fleets of MAX aircraft at multiple airlines. Consumers - and Netflix watchers - don't buy from Boeing but they can choose travel based on Boeing products. Now that the airline industry has come to accept the MAX again, the question is whether this type of documentary reopens...

    The real risk is probably less to Boeing than it is to airlines that operate the MAX now that MAX deliveries have increased and there are fairly large fleets of MAX aircraft at multiple airlines. Consumers - and Netflix watchers - don't buy from Boeing but they can choose travel based on Boeing products. Now that the airline industry has come to accept the MAX again, the question is whether this type of documentary reopens fresh wounds in the eyes of the public and leads to resistance to book MAX flights.

  48. James Guest

    Gotta hurry up and watch this before my Netflix sub expires end of the month. I'm finished with their price hikes!

    1. D3kingg Guest

      @James

      Agreed. While I want to watch this documentary I’m not paying Netflix $15.67 a month to do so.

  49. Josh Guest

    Does this make you question whether or not the 737 Max is truly safe to be back in the sky? We’ve heard from so many that it is now the safest aircraft out there because of the intense scrutiny it was under to get recertified, but can it be trusted?

  50. Alex Guest

    I’m going to watch this tonight because I love a good documentary. But always keep in mind documentaries have an incentive to invoke shock or amazement. Ultimately I hope the negative attention the past few years lights motivates Boeing to improve their safety and innovation to what we have come to expect in decades prior.

  51. Coolmom Guest

    For those who don't have a Netflix account, there is a similarly damning episode of CNBC's American Greed, Boeing's Deadly Design.

    1. Bob May Guest

      If you are truly objective, there are design flaws in every machine.

      Most design flaws are never discovered because the machine operator overcomes the flaws.

      Most American flagged airlines still have ex military pilots.

      No US pilots flying the Max failed to land.

    2. Adil Guest

      How many US pilots flying the MAX found themselves in the same situation?

    3. Rafa Guest

      Exactly,
      Several report of MCAS malfunction in US were handled correctly. Same procedure as run away trim in most aircraft. Cut off electric trim, reduce power, retrim manually. Ethiopian crew almost figured it out. They failed to reduce the power so they could not re trim manually

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Sean M. Diamond

I don't think they explicitly said that the pilots didn't make mistakes, but rather that the pilots did what they were supposed to do. The training for such a situation did not adequately capture the necessary procedures (such as to reduce thrust) and therefore in an emergency situation it is quite understandable why the crew failed to do so. The real failing of the Max program was not the MCAS itself (which was a system that was designed to make the aircraft safer) but rather the push to bury the MCAS and other features into the footnotes in order to reduce the amount of differences training needed. If the Max had a different type rating from the NG, the entire point of marketing it to compete against the NEO would have been defeated. Personally, I do believe that a crew more aware of the situation they were placed in could have indeed reduced thrust and possibly saved the ET aircraft, but the fact remains that the systems and simulator training prescribed by Boeing that they were given did not train this. Therefore they did not make an "error".

7
Bruce Guest

It’s all good and well that we make a documentary about it but Boeing executives still got bonuses at the end of that year and the board members directly responsible for the cover up did not get indicted for obstruction of justice. No one has been charged with a crime. None of them are in prison. The justice system again has failed, as it always does with rich individuals or companies. Why? Because the lobbies are too strong. Why? Because capitalism. We need to fight. We need to protest. We need to take action since our institutions are not working for us. WAKE UP. WAKE. UP.

7
Alan Gold

Much like the FDA the FAA is in bed with the companies it is supposed to oversee. At least Boeing does not have a waiver of liability.

2
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