Malaysia A350 With Impatient Pilots Enters Heathrow Runway

Malaysia A350 With Impatient Pilots Enters Heathrow Runway

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Big Jet TV is a YouTube channel that provides constant livestreams of takeoffs and landings at London Heathrow Airport (LHR). These people are legit — they park near the end of the runways at Heathrow, and capture footage for hours on end. As you’d expect, sometimes they capture something especially interesting, and here’s the latest example of that…

Malaysia A350 lines up behind other plane on runway

This video footage is from Sunday, May 7, 2023, and captures Malaysia Airlines flight MH3 preparing to depart for Kuala Lumpur (KUL). The 6,593-mile flight is operated by an Airbus A350-900, so I can appreciate that the pilots are probably excited to get underway for their 13 hour journey back home. However, perhaps they were a bit too excited.

In situations where there’s a queue for takeoff (or spacing is needed), it’s standard for aircraft to be told to line up and wait. This clearance is typically given once the preceding aircraft has started its takeoff roll, and at this point the aircraft can taxi into position on the runway, until it’s given takeoff clearance.

That brings us to this particular Malaysia Airlines A350, which… quite literally lines up on the runway immediately behind a British Airways Airbus A320. For what it’s worth, an Airbus A320 is around 123 feet long, and it looks like the separation between the two jets is less than that. And this is all as the A320 spools up its engines to near maximum power. Both flights ended up departing as planned, and made it to their destinations safely.

You can see the video for yourself below.

Was this dangerous, or just unusual?

There’s no denying that what we see above is unusual, in the sense that we don’t see it often. The people behind Big Jet TV, who spend all day watching takeoffs at Heathrow, say they’ve never seen something like this before. They comment the following about the dangers of this procedure:

Even small engines like the CFM56, V2500 (in this case with the BA Jet) or even the CF34 can inflict some serious damage from takeoff thrust. Engines and sensors are at most risk for the trailing aircraft. It’s almost as bad as sand-blasting with tiny particles of rubber and grit. In my view they’re lucky one of the speed or altitude sensors didn’t get blocked!

Similarly, just about all the pilots chiming in state that this is dangerous. One commenter states the following:

Wow! I’ve operated out of LHR for nearly 30 years, and have never seen anyone get this close on a runway. Taxiway, yes – but not on a runway behind an aircraft about to set T/O power. What were these guys thinking? Truly bonkers!

Interestingly, though, if you look at Heathrow’s airport briefing for runway departures, it states that it’s perfectly fine to line up on the runway behind another jet:

Pilots in receipt of a conditional line-up clearance on a preceding departing ACFT should remain behind the subject ACFT but may cross the RWY holding point and enter the RWY upon receipt of the clearance. There is no requirement for the subject ACFT to have commenced its take-off roll before entering the RWY. Pilots must be aware that there may be a blast hazard as the ACFT on the RWY applies power.

The important distinction here is that the airport briefing is just intended to outline airport operations, and then it’s up to pilots to decide what’s a best practice for the safe operation of their aircraft. As you can see, there’s a warning of jet blast, and that’s clearly something most pilots are concerned about. After all, otherwise this wouldn’t be the first time that Big Jet TV has captured something like this at Heathrow.

One has to wonder what exactly the Malaysia Airlines pilots were thinking. Did they just underestimate how quickly the British Airways A320 would take off? Did they read the Heathrow departure instructions, and not consider any potential hazard to their jet? Presumably they’re not usually flying this way, or else we would have seen more videos along these lines.

Malaysia Airlines Airbus A350-900

Bottom line

A Malaysia Airlines Airbus A350 had a pretty unusual departure from London Heathrow last week. The jet lined up on the runway immediately behind a British Airways A320, with probably around 100 feet separation. This is something you almost never see.

Interestingly this procedure was within the rules of the airport, but based on everything I’m seeing airline pilots say, definitely not a best practice.

What do you make of this Malaysia Airlines A350 departure from Heathrow?

Conversations (105)
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  1. Fubar72 Guest

    Much ado about nothing.
    As previously stated ; a clearance to line up behind another aircraft is quite common at Heathrow. Is this one close? - yes , but ultimately it’s the captain’s decision ( and responsibility, for any damage) in accepting the clearance and lining up. As with anything — some captains are more cerebral than others……

  2. kangtzu Guest

    What’s wholly unprofessional are the serious insinuations you make from a 30-sec video focusing on a single takeoff by one of hundreds of airlines in a congested airport.
    Video-guy was obviously looking for a story.
    & you didn’t get one!!!
    So, did you doctor your video??
    Because everyone can see you have issues with MH.

  3. ilai Guest

    Unprofessional and a safety risk. High probability of ingestion of foreign objects into both engines.

  4. Paul Millar Guest

    Absolute non story.. totally normal procedure at LHR this is the clueless clown at BJtv angling for more gullible saps to part with their cash

  5. Mike Edwards Guest

    Possibly they have been delayed so long that fuel level is now critical. Either squeeze an immediate takeoff clearance out of the controller by doing this, or return for more fuel and inevitable delays. The captain knew the tiny risk involved and chose to accept it.

  6. Raman patel Guest

    First there is difference in personality
    I bet my last $ Malaysia pilot is Muslim

    1. Prestwick Pioneer Guest

      Please explain this in flight safety language. Your comment adds nothing to the debate.

    2. I'm malaysian Guest

      I never see a matured reply like you before. Kudos teaching people like that.

  7. michelpeechen Guest

    The history of the aviation sector is rich of anecdotic cases
    This one is no exception
    They have weighted the risks and found no risk factor to do so
    Hasardous but brave

  8. Caesium Guest

    So many comments about ATC not doing anything/allowing this to happen.
    Let's be clear here, there's absolutely no responsibility on the ATCO providing spacing on the runway during lineup, it's at the pilots discretion (making the obvious assumption the instruction isn't in front of...)
    I work at a busy Intl tower and see this daily, in fact during departure peaks, I appreciate those that actually begin moving to line up before the one ahead has started to roll.

  9. Roy C Guest

    Was it not a duty of the ATC too to ensure an adequate distance between 2 aircrafts on a runway before taking off ?

  10. FlyerDon Guest

    The was simply just an Elephant Walk followed by a Minimum Interval Takeoff (MITO). It’s a technique used by the Air Force to quickly depart from an airport that’s under attack. It was just a matter of time before a civilian airport adopted the procedure.

  11. Uncle hj Guest

    blunder made by careless ATC - to heavily penalised to blokes in the tower luckily no disaster....

    1. Khoo K S Guest

      That's poor judgement by the MH pilots. Ought to be censured.

    2. Prestwick Pioneer Guest

      You are totally wrong.

  12. Marc Guest

    People here seem to think that the Malaysian capt decided on his own to line up behind the Airbus. This is [expected] rank ignorance from the finger pointers. The capt would have lined up upon the expressed instruction from ATC. If he had misconstrued the instruction (line up and wait AFTER the departed Airbus), then it would have been incumbent upon the controller to halt the Malaysian aircraft as soon as it moved past the hold short line. High drama for nothing.

  13. GPower3 Guest

    At that distances the air would have mixed with the surrounds and be quite cool or getting close to ambient air temp, the speed of the air would not pose any risk because well it’s a Jet that flies at ~900km/h. The only risk would be if there was debris or sand on the runway and they keep them clear, and that would mean they would struggle with sand storms that they get in middle...

    At that distances the air would have mixed with the surrounds and be quite cool or getting close to ambient air temp, the speed of the air would not pose any risk because well it’s a Jet that flies at ~900km/h. The only risk would be if there was debris or sand on the runway and they keep them clear, and that would mean they would struggle with sand storms that they get in middle eastern countries.
    May not be best practice I don’t know, but guys behind cameras aren’t the best to make analysis.
    And neither am I, but just trying to find what the risks are?

  14. Capt Max Carling ( Ret ) Guest

    My guess is his clearance was, 'after the departing Airbus 320, line up'.
    If English is not your first language and you were instructed to ' line up behind the departing A320' you might be in with half an excuse, however any Capt in his right mind would not put his aircraft in this position. Tea and biscuits for one Capt at the Fleet Office on arrival at KL methinks.
    Heathrow does overwhelm...

    My guess is his clearance was, 'after the departing Airbus 320, line up'.
    If English is not your first language and you were instructed to ' line up behind the departing A320' you might be in with half an excuse, however any Capt in his right mind would not put his aircraft in this position. Tea and biscuits for one Capt at the Fleet Office on arrival at KL methinks.
    Heathrow does overwhelm some crews, especially fresh ones. My advice as an ex Boeing and Airbus skipper?
    Don't do it again Son. Everybody gets a chance.
    YOU'VE HAD YOURS!!!

  15. Noah.T7 Guest

    Having operated out of LHR, the “Line Up Behind” clearance is quite common. That being said, it was still too close for comfort. Wouldn’t say it was impatience, but rather, some serious lack of airmanship and regard for safety.

    The MH pilots would probably say the BA was taking too long on the takeoff roll and minimum runway occupancy time (MROT) is in effect. But the guys in front don’t have eyes on the back...

    Having operated out of LHR, the “Line Up Behind” clearance is quite common. That being said, it was still too close for comfort. Wouldn’t say it was impatience, but rather, some serious lack of airmanship and regard for safety.

    The MH pilots would probably say the BA was taking too long on the takeoff roll and minimum runway occupancy time (MROT) is in effect. But the guys in front don’t have eyes on the back of their plane, and for whatever reason they were slow on the takeoff roll, the MAS pilots were ultimately responsible for keeping a safe separation.

    Sure, nothing happened. But aviation is no circus. Incompetence can be really costly. Much better to have pilots with better situational awareness and avoid this altogether.

  16. Todd Guest

    Looks like a typical situation i see on MSFS at any major airport with multiple players around it. As others have pointed out, and the article, just because a plane is smaller doesn't mean its engines aren't powerful. Those CFM56s produce a lot of thrust on takeoff, which can blow any random object at the plane behind it. For that reason many pilots don't enter the runway, when the departing plane is still at the...

    Looks like a typical situation i see on MSFS at any major airport with multiple players around it. As others have pointed out, and the article, just because a plane is smaller doesn't mean its engines aren't powerful. Those CFM56s produce a lot of thrust on takeoff, which can blow any random object at the plane behind it. For that reason many pilots don't enter the runway, when the departing plane is still at the entrance...I would definitely fault the MH pilots for not paying attention to the fact the A320 hasn't actually gone yet. It's much like you running into the back of someone at a turn signal because you thought they were going but stopped short.

    Typical ATC instructions would be to "line up and wait", in which the pilots would enter the runway once the departing aircraft is at least a couple thousand feet running down. If they're cleared to take off immediately after the departing jet, ATC will usually say "caution wake turbulence behind departing [insert aircraft type]".

  17. Kuna Guest

    Thank got it was not aircraftA380 in front

    1. Lina Guest

      Thats why this is allowed by ATC

  18. Aus58 Guest

    Have to be only about a 40-50 mtr distance between them . Bit surprised that ATC didn't pick it up .

    1. Caesium Guest

      What is there to pick up?

  19. Nazha Guest

    Thank you for bringing this matter up
    Fortunately no untoward accident happen. All ego aside the lives of passenger is utmost priority when handling a passenger plane big or small

  20. Gest Guest

    Even if it’s technically legal common sense says avoid getting your aircraft sandblasted, what if your pitot tubes get damaged? Not worth the risk for a few minutes gain

  21. K. O. Guest

    The pilot is getting careless and his mental state should be addressed by the airline. He probably need to be reminded the difference between be safe and a bad policy and procedure. The decisions in a cockpit supposed to be done with collaboration and not dictatorship. The first officer was probably afraid to speak up. Maybe that procedure should be added to the pre flight check list.

  22. Bob Beardsley Guest

    Just bad airmanship.
    Zero consideration for FOD

  23. Guest Guest

    The Dunning - Kruger effect is on full display in this article. If you've ever flown out of Heathrow, this is highly common practice to line up behind a departing aircraft (especially where a heavy lines up behind a narrowbody for most efficient use of runway time in Heathrow). What -at least seems- indeed uncommon is the close spacing, but if here are no rules on spacing and it's clearly visible if any FOD on...

    The Dunning - Kruger effect is on full display in this article. If you've ever flown out of Heathrow, this is highly common practice to line up behind a departing aircraft (especially where a heavy lines up behind a narrowbody for most efficient use of runway time in Heathrow). What -at least seems- indeed uncommon is the close spacing, but if here are no rules on spacing and it's clearly visible if any FOD on the runway could damage the A350 in the jetwash of the A320 - a lot of drama about nothing.

    The evidence of absence is not the absence of evidence. We simply don't know if this happens 10 times a day.

    1. Lumi Guest

      You either misunderstand or incorrectly use 'Dunning-Kruger' to describe the what has been reported. Rather, what you correctly say is akin to 'one swallow does not a summer make'. In this case, the article is merely saying, 'bit early in the year for a swallow' and not 'oh, summer's arrived exceptionally early'. The Big Jet crew probably spend more time than you or I endlessly watching landings and take offs. I'm prepared to give them the benefit of the doubt.

  24. KJ Guest

    Title should be “ British Airway pilot lazy, slow and causing slow take-off”.

  25. Capt Loh Guest

    They were definitely given the permission to line up for takeoff.
    The usual message from the Control Tower is "Line up behind departing traffic".
    That permission means they still had to wait behind the white line painted on the taxiway leading to the threshold of the runway.
    Once the departing aircraft had started the takeoff roll, then and only then they are free to enter the runway and line up for takeoff.

    They were definitely given the permission to line up for takeoff.
    The usual message from the Control Tower is "Line up behind departing traffic".
    That permission means they still had to wait behind the white line painted on the taxiway leading to the threshold of the runway.
    Once the departing aircraft had started the takeoff roll, then and only then they are free to enter the runway and line up for takeoff.
    Definitely not before that 747 had started the takeoff roll.

  26. MH Ed Guest

    Lol yearghh. Absolutely true. Why? Because the awareness of this pilot is decreased by their mentality themselves. However it didn't related with the MH17 bombing by the Ukraine Armed Forces/Rebels/Separatist a couple years ago. Not related at all.

  27. Gary Guest

    Plain Stupid arrogant and irresponsible putting hundreds of lives at risk

  28. Anglo-Saxon Guest

    From what I could calculate from the video BAW took at least 27 secs to start rolling ( maybe taking excessive time to complete checks) I have seen / experienced before they can have a reputation for this. "The runway is mine", being the attitude. However, I do not hear any ATC to confirm when take-off clearance was given, therefore cannot verify the exact occurence causes. Do not understand how the MH was given instructions...

    From what I could calculate from the video BAW took at least 27 secs to start rolling ( maybe taking excessive time to complete checks) I have seen / experienced before they can have a reputation for this. "The runway is mine", being the attitude. However, I do not hear any ATC to confirm when take-off clearance was given, therefore cannot verify the exact occurence causes. Do not understand how the MH was given instructions to line-up so close to the preceding? If the BAW had been from an intersection further down the runway, then maybe?

  29. Ken Guest

    Definitely safety of their owe aircraft and the flight is the top priority for any flight deck crew. This was probably a miscalculation they would not do it again in the same situation.

  30. Jubo Guest

    It's MAS, "Man ada sistem" "where got system"

  31. JusAGoy Guest

    Normal procedure in LHR. "Lineup behind departing British Airways A320, Rwy 09R, Lineup behind." would've been the typical clearance. Nothing wrong with what the MH pilots did, jus that even me as an A380 pilot will normally CHOOSE to wait til at least the preceding aircraft starts rolling before we lineup. I have however always wondered if anyone will actually Lineup right behind a departing aircraft... thx to MH I got my answer!

  32. Santosh Guest

    It’s a stupid and dangerous decision to get in the line of jet blast.. all you need is fine gravel floating into your engines from the jet blast to mess up your fan blades and cause an engine failure !!
    Not to mention the damage to the pitots/ sensors and cameras!!

    Hope those idiots get reprimanded for that behavior and get to sit out a couple of months!!

  33. LHC Guest

    Being a Malaysian myself, I really can't blame the Malaysian Airlines pilot. Probably out of boredom, he's just practicing a favourite local pastime...tailgating!

  34. David Guest

    Dont create an issue when there is none! Not surprised the observer might be employed by rival airlines to discredit others. Like some of the comments based on experience on you tube mentioned...its not surprusing to see this happen in Heathrow as instructed by control tower to clear clogged traffic!

  35. Alice Guest

    He is probably thinking he can fly like he drives in Malaysia, the dangerous way drivers often tailgate cars on the road, no more than 5 feet at the speed of 110km/hr

  36. John Kevin Guest

    Please investigate the actual n before passing comments tq.

  37. Robert Guest

    If you have lived in Malaysia as I have you will understand the mentality and lower education standard, they are the worst pilots I ever experiance, they do not think that is the problem and no common sense. That was why they were flying over the Ukraine when they were shot down when many other airlines already took the initiative to redirect to safe flight paths.

    Fly Malaysian Airlines at your own risk because that is exactly what it is, a risk.

    1. Two Eyes Open Guest

      Get your facts correct. The Malaysian airliner was not alone; three other foreign passenger jets were also in the same radar control sector, and thus could have been the victim

    2. Ask Guest

      Apart from MH17, British Airways, Air France, Lufthansa and KLM are among the airlines to have used exactly the same routing over eastern Ukraine.

    3. Stephen Guest

      What an ignorant comment. I presume your stint in Malaysia was a short one.

    4. Sheikh Guest

      Living in Malaysia does not justify your degrading statement about their pilots' level of education.
      Many of them are flying for internationally recognised airlines especially in the Middle East and around the world.
      So obviously they were selected based on a high standard of aviators' skills and experience.
      And by the way, your comment about the MH17 incident is also very naive!

    5. Alex Mazlan Guest

      MH17 route was mysteriously re-direct over ukraine. This spanish guy working for ukraine ATC confess over tweeter but the account was deleted. Russia satellite show images of 2 ukraine jet fighter escorting MH17 before incident. Many more which i do not want to discuss here. Up ahead was Singapore Airline who has visual or radio contact and officially ask not to say anything.

    6. Love Malaysia Guest

      Sounds like you have "ulterior motives". What is your Real name?

    7. Rory Edwards Guest

      I think you have never been to Malaysia. Most have higher intelligence than you.

    8. Lumi Guest

      There are international standards and protocols for flight paths and route options. It is crass and irresponsible to blame the Malaysian airline for the fact that Russian troops masquerading as rebels or freedom fighters fired a missile at a clearly non-military aircraft. Hence the trial at the International Criminal Court. Please consider withdrawing your remarks or apologising for them.

    9. Lumi Guest

      What a crass and ignorant thing to say. Leave aside your ability to provide any objective assessment of pilot competence. Flight routes follow international guidelines and protocols. Russian soldiers masquerading as rebels shot down a non-military aircraft. This was a crime as evidenced before the International Criminal Court. You should either withdraw your remarks or apologise.

  38. JohnRossa Gold

    Yawnnnnnnnn. Obviously a slow news day at OMAAT. Say, isn't it time to promote the Capital One Venture X card again? LOL!!

  39. Zainol Guest

    If it is within the procedure, it shouldn't be an issue as most pilot didn't practice it. Secondly, A350 is much more bigger and heavier than A320's so, lining up behind a small plane maybe a no problem matter to the MH pilot. Debris blast seem to me also not an issue as if you see the height of the A350 much more higher than the320 so, the MH pilot already confidence that it may...

    If it is within the procedure, it shouldn't be an issue as most pilot didn't practice it. Secondly, A350 is much more bigger and heavier than A320's so, lining up behind a small plane maybe a no problem matter to the MH pilot. Debris blast seem to me also not an issue as if you see the height of the A350 much more higher than the320 so, the MH pilot already confidence that it may not cause any harm to his plane.
    It seen to me that most commentator in this article are not a pilot so they did not understand the airport procedure.

  40. Steve Guest

    Many ICAO airports use conditional clearances that are not used in all parts of the world. Example: After the departing traffic, line up and wait. I’m not sure if this is a statement that is used in Malaysia or not, but it’s not used in the USA. The first time I got a conditional clearance internationally , it caught me by surprise and I asked, what did he say? LOL! It may have been a...

    Many ICAO airports use conditional clearances that are not used in all parts of the world. Example: After the departing traffic, line up and wait. I’m not sure if this is a statement that is used in Malaysia or not, but it’s not used in the USA. The first time I got a conditional clearance internationally , it caught me by surprise and I asked, what did he say? LOL! It may have been a miscommunication but regardless of the instructions I would not have line up behind another departing aircraft and at the very least would have queried the controller. Funny to see though. Glad no problems occurred.

  41. Hate sitting on the Runways Guest

    Is that the opposite of The Cathay Pilots that "slow down" compared to Malaysia that want to speed up?

  42. atcsundevil Guest

    This is 100% legal in the UK, and they used to be able to give a discretionary clearance to line up and wait to 10 aircraft in the queue. If it's a dedicated departure runway, there's absolutely nothing unsafe about this, and it expedites the flow of departing aircraft. Even in the US, a takeoff clearance can be issued to like types after the preceding aircraft is 6,000ft or more from the threshold and has...

    This is 100% legal in the UK, and they used to be able to give a discretionary clearance to line up and wait to 10 aircraft in the queue. If it's a dedicated departure runway, there's absolutely nothing unsafe about this, and it expedites the flow of departing aircraft. Even in the US, a takeoff clearance can be issued to like types after the preceding aircraft is 6,000ft or more from the threshold and has begun rotation in VMC provided they're on diverging headings. If that's not unsafe, then frankly neither is this. Mountain out of a molehill.

    1. SAT-flyer New Member

      Agreed. Granted I come from the Part 91 general aviation world (I am a CFI), but I've been in this situation of multiple aircraft lined up for takeoff on the runway more times than I can count.

  43. Sean Guest

    Any possibility of ex fighter or military culture? Of course ATC already clear them. Just thought.

  44. Terry Guest

    Many years ago while flying out of Cleveland I was watching a plane on its approach out of my starboard window. At that same time our plane taxied onto the runway and I was wondering if we would have enough time to take off when we just stopped at the end of the runway. The approaching plane ended up landing by flying over us. I had not been flying long so wasn't aware of how incredibly dangerous this was.

  45. Sean M. Diamond

    This was pretty standard at Gatwick in the mid-late 2000s (might still be) and was designed to minimize runway downtime between departures. Line up the widebody for departure and the narrow body for an intersection departure ahead of us.

  46. Will Guest

    Wrong Headline supposed be Inpatient BRITISH AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL gave clerance for line up

  47. Muindi Guest

    If is within procedure then nothing wrong only others to practice it

  48. Bob Guest

    Aircraft makes somewhat non-standard, but legal and approved, maneuver. Armchair internet commentators freak out. A post about nothing.

  49. Raja Guest

    Does anybody knows what was the exact instructions by the ATC?

    1. Anon Guest

      I was in the jumpseat flying out of LHR last month and they use the verbiage "line up behind..."

    2. Michael Member

      The specific verbiage would have been "Behind departing British Airways A320, runway 27R, line up and wait behind."

  50. Dave Guest

    I have listened to Channel 9 on United, departing LHR, many times. It is very common for a heavy following a narrowbody to be told to "Line up behind". The word "behind" is repeated when giving the clearance and is included in the read back.

  51. Scala Guest

    the MAS pilots must be from the budget airline Air Asia before. They must be rushing fro time to meet their bonus.

  52. Costa Athan Guest

    You must be reaching for stories Ben.

    1. Abdul manan jamrah Guest

      Did mas call the pilot to see the management ..do they take displine action?

    2. Dan77W Guest

      Hopefully not, as this was all completely legal.

  53. Andy Diamond

    Pilot impatience happens. This week I was on a KL flight which was taxiing so close to the plane in front that we could smell their exhaust fumes … but once we reached the runway, we stayed at the holding line until the aircraft in front had departed.

    1. Dan77W Guest

      Just because you could smell the exhaust fumes in no way indicates you were too close. Half the time that just means your APU was over serviced with oil while you were single engine taxiing.

  54. WTT Guest

    Why publish this non-story, ridiculous! Where is the proof that the Malaysian pilots were, as you said..."Impatient"??? (I used to enjoy watching the Aviation channel mentioned; but ever since it started to become more money-grabbing commercialised....like blatantly promoting Emirates. I have stopped. )

  55. McCaron Guest

    No surprise why this company has such a record with lethal accidents

    1. Naza Naamal Guest

      Name one that was caused by technical issue.

    2. Dan77W Guest

      None…besides the shoot down they have all been pilot error and/or hijackings…that in no way negates what McCaron said, he made no mention of technical issues, you did.

  56. Dan77W Guest

    Ill advised, yes….legal, yes…..safe, probably. I wouldn’t do it cause I don’t want a rock thrown at my windshield or a completely preventable Ecam/Eicas message from ADR/Pitot/TAT probes that might delay my takeoff. It’s called airmanship.

    1. Mike Guest

      A rock? This is a paved runway not a gravel road. It gets jet blasted every 60 seconds! No fod here.

    2. Dan77W Guest

      All it takes is a little piece of runway edge chunk, I had a return to gate for a chipped windshield for a similar scenario in DTW when given position and hold (as they called it back then) then to my surprise they cleared an old NWA DC-9 from an intersection right in front of me. Like I said it’s legal, it’s for the most part safe… but I creep out there a bit slower these days.

    3. SosongBlue Guest

      Mike,

      A runway is nowhere near devoid of FOD, crap gets picked up, blown over, scraped up by plowers all the darn time. And he’s quite right besides ur liable to get spurious cautions from an aircraft taking off that close in front of you. Perfectly legal but not the best “airmanship”!

  57. Stephen Guest

    Oh get a grip. Why are you reporting old news from Big Mouth Jets that has a severe and evidently un-treatable case of verbal diarrhoea. Your standards are slipping if you choose to make a story out of this. Was the CAA informed? Did the 'ATC have words'? No. And there's a reason for that because it is common practise. Please...stick to what you know....miles.

    1. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ Stephen -- I'm not sure who exactly your beef is with?

      For as long as I've written this blog, I've covered what I consider to be interesting avgeek situations, ranging from entertaining ATC interactions, to this kind of stuff. That's nothing new. I'm not making a story out of this, but rather am simply passing on something interesting I've seen, along with some comments from experts (which I'm not claiming to be in...

      @ Stephen -- I'm not sure who exactly your beef is with?

      For as long as I've written this blog, I've covered what I consider to be interesting avgeek situations, ranging from entertaining ATC interactions, to this kind of stuff. That's nothing new. I'm not making a story out of this, but rather am simply passing on something interesting I've seen, along with some comments from experts (which I'm not claiming to be in this situation).

      And I'm a little confused by your claim that this is a common practice. Why are so many experienced airline pilots then saying that they've never seen a plane taxi behind another so closely on the runway?

    2. Stephen Guest

      Ben - with respect but you're testing me here.... find me ONE source - ATC LHR, CAA UK, or any other oversight group with legal address over such manoeuvring that has called foul on this?

      If you allowed photos / screenshots here, you'd be flabbergasted by what's happened in the past 3 days ALONE in the commercial aviation industry. Why aren't you reporting these, Ben??

      Qatar Airways injuries enroute to BKK?
      Sri Lankan A332...

      Ben - with respect but you're testing me here.... find me ONE source - ATC LHR, CAA UK, or any other oversight group with legal address over such manoeuvring that has called foul on this?

      If you allowed photos / screenshots here, you'd be flabbergasted by what's happened in the past 3 days ALONE in the commercial aviation industry. Why aren't you reporting these, Ben??

      Qatar Airways injuries enroute to BKK?
      Sri Lankan A332 cabin not pressurised?
      Singapore Airlines doing their favourite thing of a tail-strike - in KTM
      Swiss A220 rejected take off.

      These are just FOUR of some reported 40 incidents in the past 4 days

      Source - one of the best if not the best aviation incident resources out there, AVHERALD.

      And note also, the comments onto your own page.

      Yes. You are making a story out of a Non-Story and if you're resorting to click-bait, then it's game over.

    3. Ralph4878 Guest

      @Stephen - why didn't you answer @Ben's question: Why are so many experienced airline pilots then saying that they've never seen a plane taxi behind another so closely on the runway?

    4. Mike Guest

      Well I'm an experienced pilot and Ive done it many times. Ever hear ground say line up and wait make room for aircraft behind also taking position.?

    5. Stephen Guest

      I did.....and read the comments here and in Big Mouth TV to see pilots saying this is very common practise.

      And - more to the point - did ATC UK or the CAA UK get involved? No. Why do you think that is, Ralph?

    6. Ralph4878 Guest

      @Stephen - no, in your response to @Ben, you did not answer the question. I'm not questioning ATC or the CAA getting involved, which I know is a point you are desperately trying to make here.

    7. Nikojas Guest

      You realise reading this blog is a) free and b) optional.
      If it's annoying you this much your should probably spend your online time elsewhere for your blood pressure if nothing else.

    8. Global Traveler Guest

      Best comment on these comments! Great job Nikojas!!!

  58. Abidjan Gold

    Watched this occur live. Couldn't believe it and I can't believe the LHR allows this.

  59. Candra Guest

    It not unusual. U guys just picking up with malaysian airlines

  60. J909 Guest

    MH is one airline I would NEVER fly. The safety/maintenance culture in Malaysia in general is appalling.

    1. Stephen Guest

      Great. More space for us. Do a little research and find out why their cockpit, engineering and cabin crew are most sought-after. Then comment again. Ask SQ, EK and QR just how many they poach....seriously.

    2. Jim Guest

      This is sarcasm right? None of their pilots, engineers or cabin crew are sought after by anyone lol.

    3. John Guest

      Many MH pilots were poached by EK, SV, Qatar, Etihad, Oman. China Airlines, KAL.

    4. green Guest

      I wouldn't fly MH again because the food sucks bad. The legroom in economy sucks too.

  61. GuiTaR Guest

    I imagine the MH A350 was cleared to position for takeoff expecting that the BA A320 would have started takeoff roll. Thus, I suspect the BA A320 delayed it's roll for whatever reason. If you look at this video, you'll see the CX 744 is clearly cleared to enter the runway while the BA A320 starts its roll. If the A320 had a delay for any reason something similar might have occurred.
    https://youtu.be/2W6b1SUK5W0

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Ben Schlappig OMAAT

@ Stephen -- I'm not sure who exactly your beef is with? For as long as I've written this blog, I've covered what I consider to be interesting avgeek situations, ranging from entertaining ATC interactions, to this kind of stuff. That's nothing new. I'm not making a story out of this, but rather am simply passing on something interesting I've seen, along with some comments from experts (which I'm not claiming to be in this situation). And I'm a little confused by your claim that this is a common practice. Why are so many experienced airline pilots then saying that they've never seen a plane taxi behind another so closely on the runway?

11
Nikojas Guest

You realise reading this blog is a) free and b) optional. If it's annoying you this much your should probably spend your online time elsewhere for your blood pressure if nothing else.

5
Dave Guest

I have listened to Channel 9 on United, departing LHR, many times. It is very common for a heavy following a narrowbody to be told to "Line up behind". The word "behind" is repeated when giving the clearance and is included in the read back.

4
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