Two Americans Died At Hyatt’s Rancho Pescadero (Carbon Monoxide Poisoning)

Two Americans Died At Hyatt’s Rancho Pescadero (Carbon Monoxide Poisoning)

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Last week, two guests were found dead at a new luxury Hyatt property in Mexico. We now know the cause — it was carbon monoxide poisoning.

This shouldn’t come as much of a surprise, given that management at the hotel reportedly knew about gas leaks, and decided to address them by… shutting off carbon monoxide detectors. I’m disgusted, and I hope someone is held criminally responsible.

Two guests found dead in Hyatt hotel room

Rancho Pescadero is a Hyatt Unbound Collection property that opened in late 2022. It’s located in the small village of El Pescadero, Mexico, in Baja California Sur, not far from Cabo San Lucas. The property has been on my radar to visit, as I love the region, and of course there’s also the Hyatt connection.

On Tuesday, June 13, 2023, two guests were found dead in their room (#201) at this hotel. Police and paramedics arrived at the property at around 9PM on Tuesday, and found a man and a woman in a room with no vital signs. The guests were identified as a couple from California, including a 41-year-old man and 28-year-old woman.

Based on initial reports from authorities, the cause of death was “intoxication by substance to be determined,” and the pair was believed to have been dead for around 10-11 hours when they were found. There were no signs of violence to their bodies. My thoughts are of course with the families of the two people who passed away — this is incredibly sad.

Hyatt’s Rancho Pescadero

Carbon monoxide poisoning to blame for these deaths

The Attorney General of Baja California Sur, Daniel de la Rosa Anaya, has today confirmed that the cause of death for the two visitors was carbon monoxide poisoning (thanks to @outofreach695 for flagging this). Authorities are now working to determine if this was caused by a leak from a pipe, or from the hotel’s boilers.

At that point, the Attorney General will seek to bring criminal charges against the party responsible for this.

Look, it would be one thing if this were an honest mistake, and if the hotel really didn’t know what was going on. However, all signs point toward this being complete negligence, and that this hotel was knowingly poisoning its guests and employees. Just to cover a few other points…

Current & former hotel employees share shocking details

The Los Angeles Times has a story with quite some claims from former and current employees, which will make your blood boil.

A former night manager who stopped working at the resort in March over a pay dispute, claims that carbon monoxide detectors at the property sounded frequently over a period of about three months in late 2022, probably because of leaks in a system that delivers gas to outdoor fire pits. After repeated complaints from guests about loud alarms, the hotel reportedly decided to disable the detectors:

“They knew there were problems with gas leaks. Everyone was aware of the alarms and that the detectors were off.”

“We are indignant that we reported this, and this tragedy still happened.”

Three current employees spoke anonymously about this, and also confirmed that these detectors were disabled. They claim that hotel mangers have ignored complaints about the strong smell of gas from both guests and employees. A few days before the guests were found dead, a housekeeper cleaning that room reportedly fell ill because of suspected gas poisoning:

“Housekeepers reported gas leaks, security reported gas leaks, maintenance workers reported gas leaks.”

First responders hospitalized after arriving at scene

The first responders who showed up at the scene have a GoFundMe, seeking help with medical bills. One of the first responders collapsed to the ground after leaving the room, and both first responders have been hospitalized:

What you may have not heard about are the two first responders that almost lost their lives as well, Fernando Valencia Sotelo and Grisel Valencia Sotelo. The brother and sister team were the attending to Abby and John when they quickly became overcome. They were able to exit the room just in time before Grisel collapsed to the ground. Fernando was able to get himself and Grisel back to their ambulance and administer oxygen to himself and to her. They were then rushed to the hospital by other team members. The hospital in La Paz did what they could but they do not have the proper treatment facilities. Today, since Grisel and Fernando were still feeling very ill and were very concerned about long-term effects, as a team we decided to take them to a private hospital in San Jose del Cabo. This is another and bigger out-of-pocket expense.

The Firefighters and Paramedics of Pescadero (Bomberos Voluntarios de Pescadero) is a nonprofit, volunteer operation that has been selflessly serving the Pescadero community since 2007. Our chief, Griselda Lorena Sotelo Amaya, is the first female fire chief of Mexico and the loving mother of Fernando and Grisel. As we grieve for the families of Abby and John, we are overcome with emotion that our chief almost lost two of her own children on this terrible night.

We have not received any compensation from any organization for their medical bills thus far. They were reluctant to go to the only hospital that has proper treatment facilities because of the cost so we are starting this go fund me to hopefully cover the cost of their treatment, any lost time off of work, and any ongoing medical care.

What the family of one of the victims says

Family members of the woman who died have a GoFundMe for her transportation and funeral costs, sharing some background on what reportedly happened. Here are the claims that are made:

While on a beautiful trip in Mexico, Abby and her boyfriend thought they had food poisoning and went to the hospital to get treatment. We were told they were feeling much better a few days later. We received a phone call saying that they had passed away peacefully in their hotel room in their sleep. We have been told it was due to improper venting of the resort and could be carbon monoxide poisoning.

Hyatt’s Rancho Pescadero

This hotel needs to be held responsible

I’m disgusted on so many levels here, and this resort has the blood of two guests on its hands. If you’ve stayed at this hotel since opening, I’d be furious, as anyone could have lost their life, and the hotel management knew exactly what they were doing.

Shame on the people running this property:

  • An American woman named Lisa Harper is the owner of the hotel; you can read about her “dream” with starting this hotel here; in fairness, we can’t say with 100% certainty how involved she was with the day-to-day operation, and if she even knew what was going on, or if the managers tried to cover this up
  • What I can say for sure is shame on management at this hotel — the current general manager is Henar Gil Rios, while the property’s first general manager was Marcel Stittner; what kind of humans (let alone hospitality professionals) are these if they’re ignoring warnings of something that’s deadly on their property?
  • This hotel is actually managed by Hyatt (rather than being a franchise), meaning that the staff at the property are Hyatt employees; what’s wrong with Hyatt’s training that something like this could happen, and that nobody brought this to the attention of corporate?!

What’s awful here isn’t just what happened in the first place, but how the hotel handled this situation after the fact. After the deaths, the hotel stayed open, and tried to downplay what happened. Let’s be clear, management knew exactly why they died, given everything leading up to this point.

Check out this post on FlyerTalk from a travel advisor who had two guests staying at the hotel when this happened. Long story short, when the travel advisor heard about what was going on, they made immediate arrangements for their guests to move to the Four Seasons Los Cabos. Here’s what they write:

  • “This nightmare only worsened when I discovered that the Rancho Pescadero general manager had initiated a separate WhatsApp conversation with my client, downplaying the incident, claiming it was safe and ‘under investigation,’ and persuading him that the property was still secure and that there were no signs to believe otherwise.”
  • “What was even more shocking, was that in spite of all the danger, reports of previous gas leak complaints, she decided to make a statement to the press before informing my clients and other guests at the hotel about what had happened.”
  • “I demanded clear answers from the general manager in several communications via email and WhatsApp. Specifically, I asked the team to confirm that the carbon monoxide detectors were in proper working condition and that my client was out of harm’s way. However, instead of addressing my concerns, the general manager evaded the question and went so far as to gaslight me and make me question my own sanity. At one point, she even sent me playful monkey emojis via WhatsApp while I was genuinely worried about my client’s life.”
  • “I had to repeatedly remind her of the seriousness of the matter and plead with her to confirm the functionality of the carbon monoxide detectors, but I received no response. This terrified me and made me realize something was very suspicious. Needless to say, I never received any confirmation. She ignored the issue regarding the gas and told me she would wait for my client to make a remark, intending to deal with my client directly via WhatsApp as if to marginalize my involvement and dismiss my concerns. I reminded her that the safety of my client is my number one priority, to which she responded that guest safety was her top priority and there was no reason to believe the hotel was unsafe.”

Wow, she sounds like a real class act. Nothing like sending playful monkey emojis after you killed two of your guests.

While it won’t bring back the lives that were tragically lost, I hope the victims of the families sue and get a huge settlement, that will act as a deterrent for other hotels to act so carelessly in the future. And I hope the current general manager is fired and never has another job in hospitality, or where she is responsible for anyone’s safety.

Hyatt’s Rancho Pescadero

Bottom line

Two Americans were found dead at Hyatt’s Rancho Pescadero, in Baja California Sur. They were found in their hotel room on Tuesday night, and were believed to have been dead for 10-11 hours. It has now been confirmed by authorities that the couple died of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Hotel employees (both current and former) report that they’ve had repeated issues with gas leaks, and that a housekeeper even fell ill in the same guest room just days before the deaths. The guests were even hospitalized during their stay, and I suspect it was for the same reason. The first responders who arrived at the scene were also been hospitalized, as one reportedly collapsed right after exiting the room.

Yet hotel management was more focused on trying to cover this up rather than keeping people safe. They tried to cover it up before the deaths happened (by shutting off carbon monoxide detectors), and they tried to cover it up after it happened (by pretending it was business as usual).

Pardon my language, but this is f*cking sickening. I’m disgusted by this hotel, I’m disgusted by management, and I’m disappointed by how Hyatt has handled this situation so far. Hyatt needs to take decisive action — this property needs to remain closed until it’s 100% safe, the general manager needs to be fired, and Hyatt needs to figure out what’s wrong with its training protocols that Hyatt employees allowed this to happen.

My thoughts are with the victims of all of this.

What do you make of these deaths at Hyatt’s Rancho Pescadero?

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  1. Anonymous Guest

    Does anyone have any updates on this?

  2. Six Travelers Guest

    Hyatt has now disabled all new bookings, at least through the fall. They have also completely removed their listing from Tripadvisor. TA's guidelines state that they will provide a temporary closure notice on accommodations, but for whatever reason, it is completely removed.

    Also, no other national news organizations have shared the official cause of death... which is peculiar? I have several bookings in 3 weeks and Hyatt hasn't responded to my correspondence nor have they...

    Hyatt has now disabled all new bookings, at least through the fall. They have also completely removed their listing from Tripadvisor. TA's guidelines state that they will provide a temporary closure notice on accommodations, but for whatever reason, it is completely removed.

    Also, no other national news organizations have shared the official cause of death... which is peculiar? I have several bookings in 3 weeks and Hyatt hasn't responded to my correspondence nor have they attempted to reaccommodate me elsewhere.

  3. Anonymous Guest

    The owners daughter is having parties at their house right after these people died. Smh no remorse or anything. Owners are on property all the time.

  4. Anonymous Guest

    The tv stations have reported the resort has temporarily closed, while the Hyatt conducts a 3rd party investigation. However, the same announcements published yesterday, continue to report unknown results of autopsy. They have not seen the announcement you linked.... maybe they should.

  5. Bunnyslope New Member

    There's a reason that articles are written on travel accessories, such as carbon monoxide detectors. These should be a must carry item for all, but specifically frequent travelers.
    https://www.travelandleisure.com/best-travel-sized-carbon-monoxide-detectors-7097587

  6. Steve Diamond

    Just bought a portable carbon monoxide detector for $20, basically the size of an old gameboy so easy to fit in a travel bag, no reason not to have this now when traveling especially in a foreign country.

    1. Stuart Guest

      Read the NYT's article this past winter. The problem is just as bad, if not worse, at U.S. hotels. And few have detectors installed.

    2. Maryland Guest

      I remember a carbon monoxide incident here at an ocean front hotel in Maryland. Two dead and a many others hospitalized. Two years later an elderly couple I knew died when their expired alarm failed at their vacation home. Check your co detectors. It's not just batteries

  7. Ivee Guest

    1 hour ago... Hyatt Unbound posts to their social media. "Perched where the high desert descends into crashing seas, Rancho Pescadero evokes a rarefied connection with nature. #UnboundxHyatt #StoriesWorthCollecting : @samanthalaurenbrooks on Instagram"

    Looks to me as though the deaths of these two victims means nothing to them. This is dangerous to tout a facility that needs to be inspected and redone. Instead its business as usual.

    1. BenjaminGuttery Diamond

      She deleted it. You should post your screenshots to Twitter and tag Ben and Hyatt and everyone!

    2. Ivee Guest

      The link below is the one I am talking about. It's still viewable and yes, I have screenshots.
      https://www.facebook.com/unboundxhyatt/videos/1018109809087285/

    3. Lindathenurse New Member

      Facebook post disappearing as we speak

  8. K.C. Guest

    I am wondering if/when Hyatt is going to address this. As a Globalist with many reservations booked and someone who promotes Hyatt properties as part of my job, I am just baffled by how horrific this is and I'm not even sure what to do at this point.

  9. Stuart Guest

    Not defending this specific property, as this is horrid, both in the situation and the handling of it. However, the NYT's had a significant article this past winter on this very problem at hotels across the U.S.

    It cited the number of deaths the past few years, and close calls, due to Carbon Monoxide poisoning in rooms. Mostly to point out the complete negligence in that only a small percentage of hotels across the world...

    Not defending this specific property, as this is horrid, both in the situation and the handling of it. However, the NYT's had a significant article this past winter on this very problem at hotels across the U.S.

    It cited the number of deaths the past few years, and close calls, due to Carbon Monoxide poisoning in rooms. Mostly to point out the complete negligence in that only a small percentage of hotels across the world actually install detectors. Which is amazing given it appears far more a danger in hotels than even fires.

  10. Kendall Guest

    Toe sucking at the Hilton doesn't sound so bad now, does it?

  11. Walter Guest

    Henar Gil Rios is likely fully responsible here. Ran into her during a stay at the Thompson Playa Del Carmen and she was a nightmare who would gaslight and deny clear World of Hyatt benefits. Her sending monkey emojis, mocking the fact that she murdered two of her guests seems entirely in character with the personality I saw in Playa del Carmen.

    Clearly, Hyatt needs to do better in training their hotel management and staff....

    Henar Gil Rios is likely fully responsible here. Ran into her during a stay at the Thompson Playa Del Carmen and she was a nightmare who would gaslight and deny clear World of Hyatt benefits. Her sending monkey emojis, mocking the fact that she murdered two of her guests seems entirely in character with the personality I saw in Playa del Carmen.

    Clearly, Hyatt needs to do better in training their hotel management and staff. Felt this a number of times across Hyatt properties in Mexico.

    1. Me Guest

      From the communities experience with the owners I think the fact that this caliber of “management” is working at the resort speaks directly to the environment set by the owners of the property. Ask almost anyone in the neighborhood and community around this resort how they feel about the way this remodel and rebranding was handled… most opinions not good among locals

  12. Thechemical Guest

    Carbone monoxide is a byproduct of incomplete combustion. So it cannot be a leak from pipes, that deliver methane. CO IS odorless. CH4 only smells because there IS mercaptan added to it, to be able to detect it. CO detectors are notoriously instable and need fréquent recalibration.

    1. Never In Doubt Guest

      This.

      Either the original accounts are hopelessly confused or Ben’s retelling of them is.

  13. Rand Guest

    How is a gas pipeline leaking carbon monoxide?

    1. javacodeguy Member

      I would argue if there are this many gas leaks, they probably also have exhaust issues from anything using said gas.

  14. Fed UP Guest

    So much for your fancy, fabulous Hyatt

  15. Martha Guest

    Me surprised? Not at all. I remember when Lisa started her property. She took advantage of everyone. Promised them the world and a small lot on property.
    Once no longer needed or simply sick of listening to the questions about when she would live up to these promises. she literally threw them out.
    She was always entitled to anything and not responsible for anything.
    My prayers are with justice for the family.

  16. JAWE New Member

    This story is so horrible - I complained to Hyatt on their handling of this; I'd encourage others to let Hyatt know that Hyatt loyalists are watching and are not happy that the hotel hasn't been closed to be fully re-inspected and the GM fired...

  17. Regis Guest

    I love Mexico but this incident says so much about business regulation and government oversight in Mexico versus the US. It boggles my mind this hotel was allowed to operate normally after (1) multiples reports of gas leaks + (2) two guests found dead in their room with obvious signs of gas intoxication + (3) first responders smelling gas in the room and (4) getting sick from it. I mean, what else was needed to...

    I love Mexico but this incident says so much about business regulation and government oversight in Mexico versus the US. It boggles my mind this hotel was allowed to operate normally after (1) multiples reports of gas leaks + (2) two guests found dead in their room with obvious signs of gas intoxication + (3) first responders smelling gas in the room and (4) getting sick from it. I mean, what else was needed to evacuate the place and shut down the hotel? It is inconceivable a situation like this in the US where any business would be allow to continue to operate under the circumstances.

  18. XPL Diamond

    I'm oh so surprised -- not -- that none of the armchair commentators who were here shouting "drugs, duh" a few days ago have retracted or apologized.

  19. RF Diamond

    A Carbon Monoxide detector should be standard in hotel rooms along with smoke detectors. As regulations have not caught up yet everywhere, it's best to protect yourselves and bring your own.

  20. Catherine T. Guest

    Ben -- I appreciate your diligence and follow-up on this very serious issue. Thank you.

  21. Mantis Guest

    I hate to say I told you so...ahh who am I kidding, I love it.

  22. echino Diamond

    CO cannot be from leaking gas pipes. That is natural gas - a very different thing. CO can originate from combustion.

    1. Michael O'Hare Guest

      Right; all the coverage of this episode has been ill-informed. "gas" made from coal used to be CO and H (hydrogen); it was toxic; you could commit suicide by putting your head in the oven, as Sylvia Plath did in 1963, But natural gas is CH3 (methane), not poisonous, with some mercaptan to make it smell. It might, in the hotel, be C6H8 (propane, delivered by truck, also not poisonous. Either could blow up a...

      Right; all the coverage of this episode has been ill-informed. "gas" made from coal used to be CO and H (hydrogen); it was toxic; you could commit suicide by putting your head in the oven, as Sylvia Plath did in 1963, But natural gas is CH3 (methane), not poisonous, with some mercaptan to make it smell. It might, in the hotel, be C6H8 (propane, delivered by truck, also not poisonous. Either could blow up a building but not poison anyone.
      I don't know where the hotel could even find coal gas now. CO could only come from a space heater (in June, in Cabo?) or a gas engine (car exhaust or generator).

    2. Me Guest

      For the record this isn’t Cabo and the beginning of June in this microclimate can be quite chilly and has been this year. All propane is trucked in in this area because no public gas infrastructure and also this hotel does not have enough power coming from the very rural power system and is running generators regularly. It also could be an improperly vented water heater or fire pits.

      Propane requires more than twice...

      For the record this isn’t Cabo and the beginning of June in this microclimate can be quite chilly and has been this year. All propane is trucked in in this area because no public gas infrastructure and also this hotel does not have enough power coming from the very rural power system and is running generators regularly. It also could be an improperly vented water heater or fire pits.

      Propane requires more than twice the oxygen natural gas does for complete combustion. That’s why an air mixer is required for propane appliances. It increases the amount of oxygen in the gas line to sufficient levels before it reaches the burner.

      Incomplete combustion can occur when the air supply has been reduced intentionally (to affect flame color), or by poor venting and/or maintenance.

  23. Regis Guest

    This could have been any of us points/Hyatt enthusiasts staying there on points and dying such a banal and preventable death. The level of negligence by the hotel is close to homicide. Hopefully lawsuits/prosecutions will be brought here in the US against Hyatt and executives for increased accountability

  24. willieron Guest

    I always travel with a battery operated portable CO2 detector, 15 bucks or so on Amazon. One more thing to carry, but worth it.

  25. Alonzo Diamond

    This article has made me purchase a CM detector on Amazon. Boycott Hyatt.

    1. Regis Guest

      This article made this Globalist and long time Hyatt enthusiast not want to stay at Hyatt properties anymore.

    2. RF Diamond

      Definitely, I will have one in my luggage.

  26. DWT Guest

    What’s most disturbing is that this is a HYATT MANAGED PROPERTY. All hotel employees are technically Hyatt employees. This isn’t a case of a franchised property being terribly run by management that is clueless about safety protocols.

    1. DWT Guest

      Hyatt still has job listings up for this property:

      https://careers.hyatt.com/en-US/careers/search?searchable=%5B%7B%22id%22:%22686160210089%22,%22text%22:%22Rancho%20Pescadero%20Resort%20and%20Spa%22,%22portal%22:%5B%2221860210089%22,%2222260210089%22,%2268160210089%22%5D,%22filterId%22:%22ORGANIZATION%22%7D%5D&_gl=1*1bcp3s6*_ga*NjY3OTM3OTE5LjE2ODcwMDg3MjE.*_ga_5MEHTT2SLK*MTY4NzI5NzM0Ny4zLjAuMTY4NzI5NzM1Ny4wLjAuMA..

  27. marcy kent Guest

    This is truly tragic. Rancho Pescadero did not newly open in 2022 - it reopened in a vastly expanded format. It was previously directly managed by the ownership (Lisa Harper) team - Hyatt came onboard with the expansion. It was previously one of the most special places I have visited - and I visited many, many times returning each year with the same group who actually met at the resort. It was small and quietly...

    This is truly tragic. Rancho Pescadero did not newly open in 2022 - it reopened in a vastly expanded format. It was previously directly managed by the ownership (Lisa Harper) team - Hyatt came onboard with the expansion. It was previously one of the most special places I have visited - and I visited many, many times returning each year with the same group who actually met at the resort. It was small and quietly luxurious - not so much in terms of facilities or amenities, but for its wide open space and very personal service. No one was ever asked for their name when ordering a meal, drink, etc - the staff knew everyone and everyone's preferences. That did change before it closed and the old team moved on and the facilities deteriorated, no doubt as upkeep was halted in anticipation of the closure. Covid likely slowed the reopening and perhaps the new management rushed things when they finally could. I sadly have not heard good things from "old" guests who tried the resort after reopening and now sadly Rancho will be off our radar. Whether the fault of ownership or management is obviously immaterial to the affected families and in fact, to prospective guests. They have both lost the trust of at least this traveler.

  28. iamhere Guest

    Seems this will not be a Hyatt property much longer. I don't think other international brands would touch it either.

  29. Paul R. Guest

    My wife and I stayed at this resort for 4 nights in April. We experienced zero problems and have been recommending the resort to friends and family since our return. The staff were attentive and on point for our entire stay. I know that there was a major expansion during the latest renovation and in fact there were still units being constructed during our visit. I never got a whiff of gas even though I...

    My wife and I stayed at this resort for 4 nights in April. We experienced zero problems and have been recommending the resort to friends and family since our return. The staff were attentive and on point for our entire stay. I know that there was a major expansion during the latest renovation and in fact there were still units being constructed during our visit. I never got a whiff of gas even though I explored the property extensively. Not sure what to conclude here but the toxicology from the autopsies should determine where the fault lays.

    1. Me Guest

      You cannot smell carbon monoxide. It is odorless.

    2. goldman sachs Guest

      CO is odorless but i think paul's suggestion was more of a "where there's smoke, there's fire".

      i don't have enough knowledge about chemistry, architecture, construction etc. to know if it is true, but it sounds plausible. where you can smell gas, it increases the hazard level of being exposed to CO?

    3. XPL Diamond

      "where you can smell gas, it increases the hazard level of being exposed to CO?"

      No. A concentration of carbon monoxide does not correlate to a leak of natural gas or propane. Certainly, when you smell natural gas or propane, get out, but that's to protect yourself from a different risk.

    4. RF Diamond

      "Chem lab and autopsy confirmed carbon monoxide poisoning this morning."

  30. Pescadero vecino Guest

    RanchoPescadero have finally taken their booking sites down until July 3, 2023. It’s the first positive move they’ve made #DoTheRightThing.

    1. Chris K Guest

      I was able to make a bunch of bookings for all sorts of dates when this news broke. Working with my concierge to get them canceled and according to her at least 20,000 points for each cancelled night as compensation

  31. [email protected] Guest

    There is also March 2023 article in Forbes Espana about Lisa Harper, the owner of Rancho Pescadero here:
    https://forbes.es/forbes-w/241531/cuatro-mujeres-viajeras-que-estan-cambiando-el-mundo/

  32. DG Guest

    @Lucky — In light of this story, will you consider / recommend traveling with a portable carbon monoxide detector or similar equipment to hotels moving forward?

    Before this, I would be comfortably blindly booking any Hyatt and feel more than assured I’m in safe hands, but this whole situation is incredibly shocking and makes me reconsider how I travel abroad.

    1. courcoison Guest

      Good day.
      Just for information it looks like the hotel is privately owned.
      I found an older article about the hotel here:
      https://www.onslowlife.com/2017/04/

    2. digital_notmad Diamond

      Likewise. This absolutely shakes up my perspective on foreign properties in major brands. I suppose that in light of how much brands allow property owners/management to get away with these days, I should have seen it coming, but I guess I (foolishly) assumed that physical safety would somehow be policed better than other aspects of the brand standards.

    3. Icarus Guest

      When you say “ foreign” would you mean not Caucasian?

      Perhaps read this -

      https://amp.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/jan/30/ohio-hotel-carbon-monoxide-poisoning

      The Hampton Inn, Marysville, Ohio

      Shocker that Americans are also foreigners.

      Sadly it’s a global issue

      https://www.forbes.com/sites/judystone/2020/01/09/hotelsa-hidden-source-of-carbon-monoxide-poisoning/amp/

    4. RF Diamond

      Yea I'm getting this one that's well reviewed and portable. https://amzn.to/3NjZASD
      Easy to chuck it in luggage.

  33. Ryan Guest

    That’s disappointing. We have 6 days booked in August.

    1. BAS Guest

      We have a stay in booked for October. You going to cancel? Terrible story and feel awful for the families. But you'd have to think the Hyatt would work to make hotel as safe as possible ASAP.

    2. Bob Guest

      Yeah because Hyatt corporate gives a damn about safety.
      They only care about brand damage

  34. Sherri Witkowski Guest

    Hotel operators and owners have become so greedy on so many levels (hidden resort fees, unclean rooms and linen, bugs in rooms, gas leaks), I'm now labeling them "hotel slum landlords." Consumers needs protection on so many levels from these greedy corporations but where is the government oversight and protection. It galls me that 2 California people recently died at a Hyatt operated luxury resort near Cabo and yet it's still open for business. What...

    Hotel operators and owners have become so greedy on so many levels (hidden resort fees, unclean rooms and linen, bugs in rooms, gas leaks), I'm now labeling them "hotel slum landlords." Consumers needs protection on so many levels from these greedy corporations but where is the government oversight and protection. It galls me that 2 California people recently died at a Hyatt operated luxury resort near Cabo and yet it's still open for business. What will it take to shut this death trap down? More deaths? I recently stayed at the Luxor in Las Vegas and was appalled that for my 4 day stay, I had no A/C in the room, no hot water and a horrible sewage leak that soaked the hallway where my room was located and all I got was rudeness from the front desk and guest services. I also got very sick as a result of my stay and I think it was the bad air and sewage leak that caused it.

  35. Chris Guest

    Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think I am. A natural gas leak does not cause carbon monoxide alarms to go off. Gas does not contain carbon monoxide and no CO detector detects a natural gas leak; CO would be formed through incomplete combustion where it's being combusted, and it doesn't sound like that was inside.

    So, the ex-hotel workers, while they may not be lying, don't understand what they're saying regarding "gas leaks."

    1. FlyeringFlyer Guest

      Wouldn't the CO alert go off if the natural gas reached a level enough to cause suffocation?

    2. XPL Diamond

      "Wouldn't the CO alert go off if the natural gas reached a level enough to cause suffocation?"

      No. A carbon monoxide detector detects carbon monoxide. It would not go off in the presence of some other gas, no matter how much.

      As for a natural gas detector, any nose will do. The smell of natural gas will be quite noticeable before its concentration becomes a cause for concern.

    3. Steve Guest

      I agree. This assertion doesn't make sense.

  36. derek Guest

    Ben wrote in the article that he wants a huge settlement. 20 years ago, a DHL 757 and a Russian made plane collided over Germany. A Russian husband, whose wife and child died, went to murder the air traffic controller. Oh!

  37. Ocean Guest

    The media should reach out to that swine governor of Illinois J. B. Pritzker for a comment since he and his family owns Hyatt Hotels.

    1. Anonymous Guest

      Dude.,,considering the Illinois governor who is the best governor in the nation, does not own Hyatt hotels nor those he have any stake in them at this time, your comment is absurd. This is a local issue and has absolutely nothing to do with the Illinois governor.

    2. Lucy Guest

      Gov J.B. Pritzker absolutely DOES own the Hyatt hotels as well as many other off-shore trusts mostly based in the Bahamas. His father and uncle started the Hyatt hotel chain, and the Pritzker family are still 85% owners. J.B. is worth $3.6 billion, and his being the best governor in the nation is very questionable. Don't forget about his Chicago Gold-Coast mansion where he removed all the toilets so he wouldn't have to pay property...

      Gov J.B. Pritzker absolutely DOES own the Hyatt hotels as well as many other off-shore trusts mostly based in the Bahamas. His father and uncle started the Hyatt hotel chain, and the Pritzker family are still 85% owners. J.B. is worth $3.6 billion, and his being the best governor in the nation is very questionable. Don't forget about his Chicago Gold-Coast mansion where he removed all the toilets so he wouldn't have to pay property taxes. I'm sure those toilets were put right back in. And how can you forget his locking down the state of Illinois during Covid while sending his wife and kids to their equine estate in Florida to enjoy maskless freedom then later sending them to their other equine estate in Wisconsin, all while chiding us about going to restaurants across the border in WI & IN? I hope the families of this poor couple do sue Hyatt which, yes, means we should get a statement from J.B. Pritzker.

    3. Bob Guest

      how does the family own 85% of the company when it's a publicly traded company and 41% of hyatt corp stocks are owned by the public? https://finance.yahoo.com/news/48-institutional-ownership-hyatt-hotels-170343507.html

  38. Allison hill Guest

    I just checked into this hotel yesterday. It’s business as usual, no one has told us a damn thing, they are keeping it very hush. My friend sent me the article after
    I posted a picture of the pool on my instagram just warning me. I was furious, per the staff here “they aren’t allowed to talk about” since it’s an ongoing investigation which I get but it’s your job to warn your guests that 2 people died here because a gas leak.
    I’m furious and sad for the families

    1. Ben Schlappig OMAAT

      @ Allison hill -- I'm so sorry to hear, that's absurd. Can't believe how the hotel is handling this situation. Any chance you would consider asking for the general manager and reporting back on what she says? She should be ashamed of how this is being handled.

    2. Allison Guest

      We spoke with her last night and she said she can’t speak on it but she can assure us we are safe. She even brought the “hyatt lawyer” over to talk with us because we were not happy with her response and he basically said the same thing. He said you guys can go to a different hotel if you would like.

    3. Ocean Guest

      You should go to another hotel and get your money back from Hyatt. Also sue Hyatt hotels for emotional stress and lack of disclosure.

    4. Icarus Guest

      Typical American response. If you don’t want to, don’t stay there
      Are you aware that staff can’t discuss an ongoing issue relating to customers you had nothing to do with
      Just leave write a polite email to Hyatt asking for a refund of the unused nights.

    5. Elle Guest

      I am here too. The trip has been a nightmare on so many levels and we are doing the best we can to salvage it, but we have so many mixed feelings and are debating what actions we are going to take. If you wanna connect my IG is ellevalera!

    6. SOS Guest

      Get out of there!! Don’t believe them. The place should be shut down! just look outside the front gate and all the protesters.

    7. Jonathan Guest

      Besides the obvious, what else is going wrong with your stay?

    8. Stuart Guest

      @Jonathan Besides wondering if you will die in your sleep at night at this property, what else might you need to go wrong?

    9. Jonathan Guest

      @stuart I was responding to (and neglected to tag) @Elle, whose comment about a “nightmare on many levels” made me curious about what other problems are happening there.

    10. AJ Guest

      I was just checking hyatt redemptions last week and this hotel was still listed. I believe 30 or 40K per night and now I see this article. That's crazy! See if Hyatt will fulfill the remaining days of your vacation at The Thompson.

    11. Allison Guest

      They relocated us all staying at the property to the cape, which is great but an hour and a half car ride to a party hotel in Cabo is not what we came for. They comped our stays for the entire vacation but they should have comped every dollar. 20 minutes before the Hyatt employee came to our door to tell us we needed to be packed up and ready to go in 30 minutes...

      They relocated us all staying at the property to the cape, which is great but an hour and a half car ride to a party hotel in Cabo is not what we came for. They comped our stays for the entire vacation but they should have comped every dollar. 20 minutes before the Hyatt employee came to our door to tell us we needed to be packed up and ready to go in 30 minutes because we were being relocated, we had just booked a car to go into todos santos. The communication all weekend was horrible and really bad. Hyatt prides them self on safety but I’ve never felt more unsafe

  39. Emil Guest

    Having taken courses on international law. The way I see this playing out is the family will not be able to sue the Hyatt brand in the US, and must instead sue the operator in a Mexican court. As this case happened in Mexico, under a franchised Hyatt brand?

    If the brand was not franchised and if the operator is based in the USA, then in that case a case should be able to proceed in the USA.

    1. Jonathan Guest

      This property is owned by an American corporate executive, which should allow the families of the deceased to pursue wrongful death claims, etc. https://www.success.com/oh-mexico-a-burned-out-ceo-turns-a-ranch-into-a-retreat/

  40. Samo Guest

    I can't see how Hyatt can be held accountable for anything since they (presumably) don't run the hotel. The responsibility lays with the hotel operator and is obviously subject to Mexican law.

    1. Nathan Guest

      It's obviously difficult to assess the validity of trip advisor reviews, but the most recent one of the hotel comes from a guest who says they also noticed and reported toxic fumes at the hotel, and had to "vacate" their room. If this was a bigger problem with verified reports, there definitely should be some liability

    2. Samo Guest

      Yes, but that liability lies with the hotel. Not with a company that essentially just licenced its brand to the hotel.

    3. Lindathenurse New Member

      The positive trip advisor reviews for this place are so over the top they have to be fake.

  41. S Gold

    Big yikes on the update. Wonder how much Hyatt can be blamed, since I doubt they were aware of the issue. I certainly hope not at least. This specific hotel is probably done though.

    1. Sookie Guest

      Read other articles. Management was aware the CO monitors were being disconnected.

  42. GoAmtrak Gold

    https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2023-06-16/mexican-resort-dead-californians-gas-leak-warnings

  43. bhcompy Gold

    Honestly it sounds like you should travel with a portable carbon monoxide detector these days, particularly if you're staying in a foreign country or private domicile.

  44. Debo Gold

    Along with the possible carbon monoxide explanation, some of these resorts also have chemical gas piping for water treatment of the pool, and for wastewater treatment. The routing of this piping could take it around some rooms, if the design/architecture wasn't best-practice. (Cutting corners happens everywhere). Ammonia or chlorine based gases can also be lethal.

    1. Chris Guest

      Do you have any clue how much ammonia or chlorine based gases smell? You would notice that in a split second and the odor would linger.

  45. Maryland Guest

    CO makes the skin a cherry red on autopsy this is usually the quick tell. I would think they should interview the previous guests for information and close the hotel until there is an answer. Prayers for the families and injured

    1. Redella Guest

      Those are the exact symptoms noted in the victims and the paramedics who were affected. I know the paramedics personally and are helping them get treatment.

  46. Sky King Guest

    So we just returned from the hotel about 2 weeks ago. The hotel is split into, lets call it 3 different room sections. The old, original, hotel has 12 rooms split into 3 buildings. Then all the new buildings. Finally the beachfront villas. Those have pools and fire pits. Now I'm not sure which room type these people had. We were in the original buildings. Globalist upgrade was a great room with a rooftop deck....

    So we just returned from the hotel about 2 weeks ago. The hotel is split into, lets call it 3 different room sections. The old, original, hotel has 12 rooms split into 3 buildings. Then all the new buildings. Finally the beachfront villas. Those have pools and fire pits. Now I'm not sure which room type these people had. We were in the original buildings. Globalist upgrade was a great room with a rooftop deck. Stairs up to the room. The new buildings have elevators. Inside was a mini split heater/ac which we used during the last week of May because its was freezing and windy. Had the heater on full blast. These are all electric. But there are multiple fire pits throughout the property and therefore gas lines are probably running everywhere. Not to mention hot water heaters for the rooms could be gas. Gas could have leaked into a building (especially the new build ones). Yes the pools are heated here. We were glad they were. It was a fantastic hotel and honestly would probably still go back although with a carbon monoxide detector. Service is a little on the slow side but oh well.

  47. Holly Guest

    My guess is they bought drugs laced with fentanyl and that’s why the first responder got sick so quickly.

    1. Mark Guest

      That is a myth. It is almost impossible to OD on fentanyl from simply touching it. You would have to touch a lot of the drug, then rub it into your eyes, nose or mouth. Very unlikely, especially since a first responder would know not to be careful about touching themselves with dirty gloves.

    2. Frank B Gold

      Yeah, here's how you know that's BS. If fentanyl was so easy to absorb that you could OD from just touching it, why would a drug addict bother swallowing it or shooting it into their veins? It's just a waste of time if you just have to touch it. Every one of those cops touch fentanyl stories has symptoms that don't ever come close to an OD, things like rapid heart beat and breathing, skin flush. OD's hearts and breathing slow down to the point they eventually stop.

    3. Glen Guest

      you're not on facebook or fox news, d.a.

  48. GoAmtrak Gold

    This is my nightmare. My heart breaks for the victims' families and my heart also goes out to the first responders who will face unknown effects for the rest of their lives. Maybe it's some other toxic gas but it's still worth highlighting the CO issue.

    I bought a portable CO detector last year after reading about these various incidents. Most hotels and rentals, it's always 0 PPM. But multiple rooms and hallways at a...

    This is my nightmare. My heart breaks for the victims' families and my heart also goes out to the first responders who will face unknown effects for the rest of their lives. Maybe it's some other toxic gas but it's still worth highlighting the CO issue.

    I bought a portable CO detector last year after reading about these various incidents. Most hotels and rentals, it's always 0 PPM. But multiple rooms and hallways at a Park Hyatt (that Ben has reviewed!) hit at 50-65 PPM. Not immediately toxic to a healthy person but not awesome to hang out in for days. The duty manager basically gaslit me (for lack of a better term) about their engineering standards, but I successfully walked with a refund and some WOH points.

    Ultimately the problem is a lack of regulation. I was in a jurisdiction that didn't require CO detectors in rooms. Businesses simply cannot be trusted to self-regulate. Incredible that so many properties won't invest in such an inexpensive measure that could save lives unless they're forced to. Just say no to regulatory capture by your local politicians. Just say yes to having your own back when you travel.

    1. S Gold

      I think it's fair to name the Park Hyatt that had this issue so potential guests know.

    2. GoAmtrak Gold

      Zurich. I haven't put them on blast in any public forum, but there it is.

    3. Redella Guest

      Ironically, the rumor is that the CO detectors had been disabled as the alarming was bothering the guests. Clearly further investigation to determine fact from gossip needs to be done, the suggestion is very alarming.

    4. Lindathenurse New Member

      can you recommend the CO detector you have? What is the brand?

  49. Helen Guest

    The symptoms of exposure to low levels of carbon monoxide can be similar to those of food poisoning and flu. But unlike flu, carbon monoxide poisoning doesn't cause a high temperature (fever). The symptoms can gradually get worse with long periods of exposure to carbon monoxide, leading to a delay in diagnosis.

  50. Kair Member

    If it is not CO, perhaps mixing of bleach and other cleaning products could be the cause.

  51. pstm91 Diamond

    A lot of people complain about the credit card posts, but these are the blogs that I cannot stand. Yes, I understand it's travel related, but it would be significantly better to publish this after the facts are obtained. This blog and others that are pure speculation accomplish nothing; if anything they bring out the worst in the commentators (which is saying something), and mindless/baseless speculation.
    I click on these blogs under the assumption...

    A lot of people complain about the credit card posts, but these are the blogs that I cannot stand. Yes, I understand it's travel related, but it would be significantly better to publish this after the facts are obtained. This blog and others that are pure speculation accomplish nothing; if anything they bring out the worst in the commentators (which is saying something), and mindless/baseless speculation.
    I click on these blogs under the assumption there is "news," but this is incomplete news.

    1. Kair Member

      Plenty of news is being reported without all the facts are known. You just gotta be able to sort through what is known versus what is not yet known.

    2. Regis Guest

      I bet you are one of those who object to MH370 stories too because the facts are not in yet and everything is "pure speculation".

    3. Bob Guest

      If that was the case there would be no news because most stories would take months to report and many may never be resolved. And how would you even know when a story is actually resolved? Not to mention people have short attention span or empathy for something that happened months ago. If you want to bring awareness to something it would have to happened pretty currently.

    4. glenn t Diamond

      Agree with the OP here.
      This fringe story is bread 'n butter WFTW content! No doubt Mr Lett will pick this up if he hasn't already.

    5. pstm91 Diamond

      You guys are missing the point - this is not a news outlet. It's a blog; the original post alluded to the possibility of drugs, and the blog was nothing more than one big speculation. All that does is fuel ridiculous, speculative comments. If he had just waited a couple of days to publish this story, it would be entirely different since we now know its CM and the hotel is looking liable, making it...

      You guys are missing the point - this is not a news outlet. It's a blog; the original post alluded to the possibility of drugs, and the blog was nothing more than one big speculation. All that does is fuel ridiculous, speculative comments. If he had just waited a couple of days to publish this story, it would be entirely different since we now know its CM and the hotel is looking liable, making it very much news-worthy and would have prevented 99% of this asinine comments.
      @Regis - Comparing anything to MH370 is absurd.

  52. S Gold

    With the first responders almost dying too, it's definitely an issue with the room/hotel. I'd be getting the hell out of there if I was there now and would cancel any reservations there too.

    Also, apparently, buy a CO2 monitor for travel. Didn't think of that but saw it below in the comments and it's a good idea. Going to do it myself.

    1. DCAWABN Guest

      Isn't it mon-oxide? Because it's di-oxide and tri-oxide. From OXygen.

  53. AAron Guest

    Has insecticide / pesticide exposure been ruled out?

    Chemical exposure can be perceived as food poisoning - especially in countries with high levels of corruption and poor government oversight where businesses are known to seek out illegal insecticides / pesticides on the grey market that they perceive to be more effective. This is more of an issue with Airbnb as it relates to pest control, but I've also seen outdoor areas at large resorts...

    Has insecticide / pesticide exposure been ruled out?

    Chemical exposure can be perceived as food poisoning - especially in countries with high levels of corruption and poor government oversight where businesses are known to seek out illegal insecticides / pesticides on the grey market that they perceive to be more effective. This is more of an issue with Airbnb as it relates to pest control, but I've also seen outdoor areas at large resorts and resort landscaping aggressively treated near building air intakes. After carbon monoxide this seems like the other most likely scenario?

  54. Ive Guest

    Many of the 'prescription' drugs sold in places like Cabo or Cancun are fake. If you are trying to by Oxy chances are you are getting fentanyl. There have been several ods from counterfeit drugs from Mexico

    1. AAron Guest

      It's possible they got poisoned purchasing cheaper prescription drugs too. Or maybe they were medical tourists and had a bad procedure. I would be almost as suspicious dealing with legitimate prescription drugs / healthcare services in Mexico as I would be with the recreational / back alley stuff stuff.

  55. JohnnyBoy Guest

    CO poisoning can definitely give you stomach illness symptoms. Also, food poisoning in Mexico (and many other places) is not uncommon, and it is totally possible that the two incidents are not due to the same cause.
    All of you claiming it must be drug use are gutter trawling.
    CO poisoning is surprisingly common and new construction like this could definitely have improper venting. The rooms all have vents in them for HVAC...

    CO poisoning can definitely give you stomach illness symptoms. Also, food poisoning in Mexico (and many other places) is not uncommon, and it is totally possible that the two incidents are not due to the same cause.
    All of you claiming it must be drug use are gutter trawling.
    CO poisoning is surprisingly common and new construction like this could definitely have improper venting. The rooms all have vents in them for HVAC and they most likely use gas for heating. And those of you claiming that they don't need room heating, have never been to BCS in the winter (I have).

  56. tj Guest

    Am I the only one that feels gofundme pages by people that aren't poor are tacky? you vacation at a 5 star hotel that runs 1k/night, you clearly got money. The deaths are heartbreaking but that doesn't give you the right to pump strangers for $$$.

    1. Me Guest

      Of you would like to help someone else who was injured in this incident you can contribute to the healthcare for the local volunteer first responders who are hospitalized. https://gofund.me/41745a59

    2. Ive Guest

      Could you provide details on how the first responders were injured?

    3. Redella Guest

      I live in the community of Pescadero and work with the volunteer fire department and personally know the first responders who attended the scene and were hospitalized. The volunteers department has a Facebook page “Bomberos Voluntarios Pescadero “ They receive zero funds from government, 100% donation supported, and despite a extremely limited budget, accomplish amazing work in the community. Feel free to contact us directly for more information.

    4. Ive Guest

      No you are not but US has become a begging society regardless of means.

    5. Kair Member

      Looks like mostly family/friends are donating so its probably okay. Although I would like any fundraisings to specify what the fund is for.

    6. LK Guest

      well c'mon, they could have been staying on UR points

    7. Lindathenurse New Member

      The 2 people are not married and the family needs the money to get the woman's body home. Most likely the man paid for the room as he is a CEO

  57. Mm Guest

    https://gofund.me/041ab5a7
    This is for the first responders!!
    Prayers to the families that have been affected.

  58. SeriousTraveler Guest

    This strongly sounds like a similar story to the American couple who died in Fiji several years back. They went to the hospital, got released, only to die in their room. In the case in Fiji it was highly suspected the room had been fumigated and should have been on 24hr hold. Instead miscommunication between departments led to the Front Desk checking a couple into the room and them later dying. Kinda makes me not...

    This strongly sounds like a similar story to the American couple who died in Fiji several years back. They went to the hospital, got released, only to die in their room. In the case in Fiji it was highly suspected the room had been fumigated and should have been on 24hr hold. Instead miscommunication between departments led to the Front Desk checking a couple into the room and them later dying. Kinda makes me not trust hotels much wether it’s CO or pesticides how can we protect ourselves from mistakes made by the front desk or maintenance teams.

    https://abcnews.go.com/amp/International/investigation-american-couples-mysterious-death-fiji-weeks-officials/story?id=63548975

  59. Stuart Guest

    I’m sure we can expect a complete and thorough report from Mexican officials. Ya know, 50 bucks is 50 bucks.

    1. Stuart Guest

      As well, the idea of anything related to drugs in this post is pretty callous. They had been to a hospital the day of and reported as being sick. Do better, Ben. Unless you want to be Gary.

  60. Bill Guest

    "This doesn’t just sound like some fentanyl overdose, which I think is the first assumption many people would make with such deaths." Media covered this yesterday and nobody suggested a drug overdose or mentioned fentanyl. Instead they said they suspected it was a gas leak. Not sure why you would bring up the idea of a drug overdose when there has been absolutely no evidence to suggest such a thing.

  61. P Wem Guest

    Multiple deaths from fentanyl laced drugs is happening all over the US right now with increasing regularity. Get real. The fentanyl is flowing to us from Mexico. This is the likely cause of death.

  62. Isac García Guest

    How can one go to a foreign country & drug oneself to death ‍♂️

  63. FLLFLYER Guest

    There was a story last year about two American couples who died at a resort in the Bahamas. Toxicology proved CO2 poisoning - yet the hotel does not have heating in the rooms. I don't remember why it happened but it was proven.

  64. Joe Guest

    Stayed there a month ago in the same room category (wonderful place). The only gas around would be from a hot water heater, and from what I could tell, it's probably electric, and even if it was gas it would have to have been outside the dwelling. One shower is inside, the other outside. The only other gas was for an outside fireplace, but that's outside. Never found out if that was gas from a tank, or they had a gas line. So I'm highly doubtful this was gas or CO.

    1. Ellen Guest

      Do you know what room category they were in?

  65. Dander Guest

    As a person who has had children of friends and in-laws die of overdoses the family will rarely admit that they died of drugs. It’s always a heart attack. My friends cousin and her friend died of a drug overdose in a hotel room. They do happen. They could have done a line of adulterated coke who knows

    1. Ic carlos Guest

      Yes I agree. They go to Mexico seeking cheaper drugs & then wanna blame everything else for what happens to them

    2. Ralph4878 Guest

      Somehow, I doubt a couple from LA staying at a $600+ per night resort was down there seeking out the cheap stuff...

  66. Fred Guest

    Wait I didnt know they were shooting White Lotus Season 3 in Mexico!

  67. Kevin Guest

    I wonder if John Heathco’s wife in Newport was aware her husband was in Mexico with a 22yo!

  68. KS Guest

    I travel frequently for work and pleasure. A year ago after reading about several deaths r/t carbon monoxide in different resorts, I purchased a carbon monoxide detector. I don’t travel without it! Best $20 spent for peace of mind!!

  69. Mantis Guest

    Highly unlikely that two guests simultaneously die of a drug overdose. That just doesn't happen. Different bodies have different OD limits, reactions, timing, etc. It's almost certainly CO poisoning in their sleep.

    1. Bagoly Guest

      If dead c10 hours before discovery could be 12 and 6?

    2. Donato Guest

      I have not ruled out home made Ethyl alcohol mixed into drinks.

    3. Bob Guest

      It would if they bought bad local drugs.

    4. BBK Diamond

      My reply was @Mantis, super valid point.

  70. Ann Guest

    I live near Rancho Pescadero. There is no gas in the rooms.

    1. BBK Diamond

      The gas system is for the fire pits

  71. MM Guest

    Its hard to know for sure what happened, perhaps the familes will be able to get autopsies done, however there is a report out now that the couple ages 41 & 28, the information below was reported on Yahoo, via the Daily Beast.

    A GoFundMe organized by Lutz’s family said the couple went to the hospital several days earlier to seek treatment for what they thought was food poisoning. The couple reported they were feeling...

    Its hard to know for sure what happened, perhaps the familes will be able to get autopsies done, however there is a report out now that the couple ages 41 & 28, the information below was reported on Yahoo, via the Daily Beast.

    A GoFundMe organized by Lutz’s family said the couple went to the hospital several days earlier to seek treatment for what they thought was food poisoning. The couple reported they were feeling much better, but the family received a call a few days later with news of their deaths. The family said they were told the deaths were due to “improper venting of the resort” and could be carbon monoxide poisoning.

  72. Henry Guest

    The time of death actually may be different from the time of drug use as this activity can last longer than you expected and it may take a while for that hit to crash your body.

    1. BradStPete Diamond

      As an a Surgical Nurse Specialist...YES, absolutely possible

  73. Brian Guest

    I think deaths in hotels happen more often than we know. I was in a hotel in Vietnam when I was told they had just found a dead man in his room one of the mornings I was there. The only reason I was told was because I had been dating one of the employees at the hotel. Otherwise, I would have never known.

    1. Joe Guest

      Not something a hotel would be willing to advertise.

  74. Taylor Guest

    Very sad. I wonder what the liability laws are around things like this in Mexico and what, if any, recourse exists for their families if this in fact a gas poisoning. This hotel is certainly on my list to visit, so I'm curious to know what incentives exist to get hotels to put safety systems in place, aside from bad press.

    Disappointed by others who automatically jump to drugs. It's possible, but let's not try to assume the worst of everyone.

  75. MoreSun Guest

    Tainted alcohol is another theory

  76. Nemme Guest

    Maybe just taking what in the US would be recreational, since OTC drugs are easy to get in Mexico. LA Times just reported that 4 out of 6 pills included fentanyl in testing of Mexico pharmacies.

  77. Ryan Guest

    Cocaine laced with fentanyl for sure. And there is nothing out of the ordinary about a couple doing cocaine in the morning while on vacation in Mexico. Just saying.

    1. Donna Diamond

      @Ryan - I would lean in that direction with the scant information available.

    2. Martha S Guest

      This is a very sad situation. I live down the road from rancho pescadero, and there was a scent of gas present in the neighborhood, Apparently all day. the first responders first concerns was a gas leak and they were in fear of a fire or explosion. A member of the department said that an OD was not the cause. But in all fairness, we must wait for the toxicology report to come out. Either way Rancho pescadero has many noncompliances and dark karma.

    3. Sookie Guest

      No drugs. Carbon monoxide poisoning.

  78. Matt Guest

    Mexico is really trying hard to scare away tourists yet people keep traveling there

    1. Sel, D. Guest

      Hi Matt, keeping in mind that their own actions *may* have led to their demise, please try and find stories of Americans passing away in Mexico while on vacation. Add them all up, and see how long it takes you to just match the number of deaths in ONE infamous and tragic night in Las Vegas.

      p.s. thanks for your fear mongering. Helps keep the costs down.

    2. Antonio Guest

      You are funny, dirty daddy 42 and naughty lady 22 die in a foreign country and the cause is Mexico's, Hope the invoice for such real and true love was paid on advance... I mean the hotel invoice ;pp

    3. Eskimo Guest

      @Antonio

      You mean Hyatt hotel invoice? ;p
      So 'real and true love was paid on advance' also earns WoH points!!!!

      Now that's going to be a blogger selling point for Mexico.

  79. Billy Pate Guest

    And just down the road, the Hyatt Ziva Cabo is well documented for it's serving of fake bootleg alcohol.

    1. Todd Diamond

      https://lmgtfy.app/?q=Hyatt+Ziva+Cabo+bootleg+alcohol

  80. Chris Guest

    Drugs, they just don’t know which ones.

    Carbon Monoxide in a place that doesn’t need heating and that doesn’t seem to have individual gas stoves in the rooms seem a bit far fetched.

    1. AJO Gold

      The rooms do not seem to feature furnaces or gas heaters, so carbon monoxide sounds unlikely. Substance abuse sounds like the most obvious cause of death.

    2. Joe Guest

      Unless said swimming pool was in their room I find it hard to believe it killed just them.

    3. TravelCat2 Diamond

      Some swimming pool heaters generate carbon monoxide.

    4. Baliken Guest

      Do they use heaters for pools in Mexico?

    5. Bunnyslope New Member

      Tell us you didn't read the article...without telling us.

  81. Nelson Diamond

    "Police and paramedics arrived at the hotel around 9PM"

    So I guess the bodies were discovered not that much before.
    My question is "why" were they discovered late afternoon? Never stayed at a Hotel when the room is cleaned in the afternoon unless of course you put your "Not Disturb" on the door). So supposedly they were discovered due to some other reason, maybe like a smell of gas or something like that by other guests.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.

Anonymous Guest

Dude.,,considering the Illinois governor who is the best governor in the nation, does not own Hyatt hotels nor those he have any stake in them at this time, your comment is absurd. This is a local issue and has absolutely nothing to do with the Illinois governor.

8
Mark Guest

That is a myth. It is almost impossible to OD on fentanyl from simply touching it. You would have to touch a lot of the drug, then rub it into your eyes, nose or mouth. Very unlikely, especially since a first responder would know not to be careful about touching themselves with dirty gloves.

8
DWT Guest

What’s most disturbing is that this is a HYATT MANAGED PROPERTY. All hotel employees are technically Hyatt employees. This isn’t a case of a franchised property being terribly run by management that is clueless about safety protocols.

5
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