Does Anyone Want To Be Escorted To Their Hotel Room?

Does Anyone Want To Be Escorted To Their Hotel Room?

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A reader raised an interesting question in the comments section of my Ritz-Carlton Turks & Caicos review, which I wanted to address in a separate post. Everyone has a different travel style, so I wonder how varied OMAAT readers’ opinions are on this.

Luxury hotels escorting guests to rooms…

At luxury hotels, it’s pretty standard for the front desk associate to offer to escort the guest to their hotel room after checking in. Reader JP asked the following question when I mentioned this in the context of my review:

One very stupid question…but from everyone’s experience, what’s the purpose of the “do you need me to take you to your room” offer? Is it for tips? Is it just legacy? Given that most people have travelled for years, and the ones who have never travelled probably won’t tip thinking it’s part of the service, what purpose does this serve anymore given that I’ve never been “lost”…

(That said…my partner does say I do excessive research ahead of time for everything)

This is a great question, and it immediately reminds me of the below scene from Curb Your Enthusiasm, where Larry David is escorted to his hotel room. The hotel employee shares all kinds of useless information, and then Larry realizes he doesn’t have money to tip the guy, and the situation gets awkward.

My take on being escorted to a hotel room

I’m with JP on this one, I don’t really get the concept of being escorted to your room, at least at a vast majority of hotels. A few thoughts:

  • I don’t think there’s anything wrong with a hotel offering to escort guests to their room, but I’m not a huge fan of them proactively saying they’ll escort you to your room, as it can make it kind of awkward to reject them
  • I do think there’s value to this at hotels that are really spread out and have multiple buildings, or where the way to the room isn’t obvious; however, that’s a small minority of hotels, in my experience
  • In many cases when you’re escorted to your room, all kinds of unnecessary information will also be shared with you, including how the TV works (you use the remote), how to use the Wi-Fi (use your name and room number, how novel!), that the stuff in the minibar isn’t free, etc.
  • For hotels that do escort guess to rooms proactively, I at least appreciate when they ask if you want more information about the room, rather than just reciting their script automatically
I can appreciate the value of being escorted at some resorts

Then there’s the question of what the right policy around tipping is in these situations? For countries or areas where tipping is generally expected, here’s my take on how that applies for being escorted to the room:

  • If you’re being escorted by a bellman and are getting help with your luggage, it’s appropriate to tip them (since they’re helping with your luggage)
  • If it’s a front office associate escorting you to your room and they’re not helping with bags, I don’t think it’s necessary to tip

The problem is that in some cases hotel staff seem to almost bulldoze their way into this situation:

Hotel employee: “I’ll go ahead and escort you to your room now.”
Me: “Thanks for the offer, but that’s not necessary.”
Hotel employee: “Oh, it’s no problem, and let me help you with your bag.”
Me: “That’s not necessary, thanks.”
Hotel employee: “I insist.”

In those situations I can’t help but feel guilted into tipping.

Bottom line

Many luxury hotels will escort guests to their room after checking in. In some cases they’ll do it proactively, while in other cases they’ll at least offer it. Personally I almost always reject the offer, unless the hotel has a particularly complicated layout.

I do find the practice in general interesting, because I’m not sure I totally understand the logic, and what the tipping norms are around this (at least for hotels in areas that have a tipping culture).

Where do you stand on being escorted to hotel rooms? Do you like being offered the option, and if so, do you accept it? Under what circumstances do you then tip, if any?

Conversations (117)
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  1. Brendan Joseph Madden Guest

    That last line of the script 'I insist' is plain rude. I have had that multiple times, won't say which hotels but in NYC, and ...well a lot of places in NYC. I think you're placing this FOR AMERICANS IN AMERICA, whereas where you cross cultures and norms, the 'guided tour' is helpful. Tipping is not normal in mainland Europe, and it's not expected for something like this where the clientele is European. If a...

    That last line of the script 'I insist' is plain rude. I have had that multiple times, won't say which hotels but in NYC, and ...well a lot of places in NYC. I think you're placing this FOR AMERICANS IN AMERICA, whereas where you cross cultures and norms, the 'guided tour' is helpful. Tipping is not normal in mainland Europe, and it's not expected for something like this where the clientele is European. If a bell person is carrying my bags from check-in to the room, and that's the culture (particularly at city hotels where the lobby is up a few floors, and then you take another lift to get to your room), then that's fine, it's just a cost to factor in. If it's literally walk in on the ground floor and then my room's on the 5th floor, and I have a single cabin-sized roll-along, someome offering to take me will be firmly rebuffed, I have zero interest in giving you five dollars for the awkward charade of something I would MUCH rather do myself.

    1. On a spread out property, particularly resorts, it's actually beneficial to be escorted to your room, particularly where it's a golf cart ride away (in which case it's more organic). JW Marriott Venice, some Kempinskis, most Belmond resorts. In Ritz Carlton hotels, generally you can ask whatever you want at the club lounge, which is less awkward.

    2. In Room: Many Europeans won't know how to work AC, just like many American's don't know how to work a thermostatic valve on a radiator. I appreciate being told something helpful about the AC. Most people won't know how to operate the Toto, but that's a slightly awkward chat anywhere.

    3. It's a good opportunity to ask the annoying questions that they normally do at the front desk, would you like a wake up call, newspaper, our lounge is x, the pool is x, towels at the pool, and in some cases (status or booking related) the minibar actually IS Free, so that's helpful. Would you like some ice sent up, still or sparkling water, and practicalities like booking in for spa treatments, etc. I don't think concierge chat is good on that walk, but it's a genuine opportunity for someone to be friendly and personable and helps hugely in anticipating guest needs, picking up on things like a big anniversary etc. It significantly reduces the likelihood a guest will reject a room as well, as you're colouring their first impression and taking care of things like the lights, so they see it in its best light. It's also an opportunity to discretely pick up on anything amiss with the room. We've all had times our key card doesn't work, in a spread-out resort that's a F***ing pain. When this happens on the 'tour' version, they simply say 'I see there's an issue with your key, I'll have someone come up with new keys, and would you like me to get some fresh cold water?' or something like that :)

    Lastly, we've all had times we're given the key to another guest's room right? It means it's not you walking into that.

  2. Azamaraal Diamond

    We arrived at the Hilton in Chongqing and were greeted by all the senior staff including the Manager. To this day I have no idea why. For the entire stay they hovered over us and were extremely helpful. They escorted us to the Presidential Suite and were so proud of their hotel that we couldn't tell them we were ok. I will never forget the experience - they even treated us to a limousine ride...

    We arrived at the Hilton in Chongqing and were greeted by all the senior staff including the Manager. To this day I have no idea why. For the entire stay they hovered over us and were extremely helpful. They escorted us to the Presidential Suite and were so proud of their hotel that we couldn't tell them we were ok. I will never forget the experience - they even treated us to a limousine ride to the airport and a fancy dinner in their restaurant. I must admit it was enjoyable to be so pampered.

    On the other hand we stayed in a fancy Lodge basically overlooking Victoria Falls. Each of the rooms was in a 4-plex. In this case it was a gauntlet that had to be experienced. One luggage person - bags to golf cart. Tip. Driver drives to 4-plex and stops. Tip. Houseboy comes down the stairs and lugs our bags up to room. Tip. Ye gods, it seemed it would never end. Luckily I had a few South African Rand so had small enough that I could tip..

    When we travel light (most times) we do our own luggage probably inappropriately in some 5* hotels where nobody lugs their own bags. Sometimes embarrassing.

  3. Ed Guest

    Take my luggage to my room, by all means, but I’ll make my own way there; probably slowly and circuitously. Unless it’s late at night I’m unlikely to want to go straight to my room anyway.

  4. Patricia Guest

    My daughter & I disagree on the tip amount for a bellhop assisting with our luggage at a 4 star hotel in Europe.

    Suggestions?

    1. Eskimo Guest

      Let your spouse decide.

    2. AC Guest

      Who's money is it? If it's her money...let her decide...if it's yours, then you decide.
      If it's shared, then whoever wants to pay more makes up for the shortfall.

  5. tuotuo Member

    Read all the comments and still no answer. How did this escort thing originate? What was its original purpose?

  6. Michael Guest

    From my perspective, managing luxury hotels/resorts in places that could be described as exotic.

    Yes we will escort you to your room/villa because:
    1. For the price you pay you may very well expect this and it is part of personalised luxury service, we don't just bring you to your room, we want to learn about you, your preferences & needs during your stay. We take notes, discreetly, to ensure you feel at...

    From my perspective, managing luxury hotels/resorts in places that could be described as exotic.

    Yes we will escort you to your room/villa because:
    1. For the price you pay you may very well expect this and it is part of personalised luxury service, we don't just bring you to your room, we want to learn about you, your preferences & needs during your stay. We take notes, discreetly, to ensure you feel at home.
    2. Because things work differently in this part of the world, and we need to explain to the average American (and sometimes other nationalities) that power outlets run on a different voltage, mosquitos outside and nature are part of the experience when travelling to exotic places, that not everyone might speak your language fluently, that the hose in your toilet has a purpose, that tipping culture here is different etc. that is of course if you are interested to learn. Our employees are well trained to read verbal & non-verbal clues.
    3. because we want to make sure you can make the most out of your holiday/stay, even if 1 out of 100 guests get lost, miss a great feature of our room, or complain at check out that they didn't know the items in the minibar were chargeable. Escorting you to your room and explaining everything makes it easier for us and for you.

    That leaves out all the other reasons why such as brands requiring to do so as part of guest service standards, because you're lazy and might have buggies if its a resort etc.

    1. Brendan Joseph Madden Guest

      Exactly. You've nailed it. It's the best possible opportunity to personalise services, and you're picking up on non-verbal cues, including if a guest is disappointed with the room or if a pre-notified preference (feather pillows, etc) has not been met, or if there's any service issues with the room. You'll also pick up subtly when they want to go out for dinner or work or sight seeing, and can schedule that with maintenance/housekeeping if necessary.

      ...

      Exactly. You've nailed it. It's the best possible opportunity to personalise services, and you're picking up on non-verbal cues, including if a guest is disappointed with the room or if a pre-notified preference (feather pillows, etc) has not been met, or if there's any service issues with the room. You'll also pick up subtly when they want to go out for dinner or work or sight seeing, and can schedule that with maintenance/housekeeping if necessary.

      Actually you've picked up on things like how in Ireland (where I live) there are NO outlets in bathrooms, and you get 'done up' at the mirror at the desk. It's not obvious to someone who is not used to it. If someone looks with an upset face towards the outlets, then you can proactively offer an adaptor.

      In a hotel in St Moritz, it started snowing as they were showing me how to use the tilt-turn door to get onto my balcony, and I said 'Oh beautiful but I'll enjoy it from here as I didn't bring a snow jacket', they said, 'Oh no, would you like to go out because I can get someone from the shop to bring it up for you, we are always happy to lend anything to guests they might need, it's our pleasure as we want guests to enjoy everything regardless of the weather.'

      Now, to be fair, that was service you'd both tip for, and return for.

  7. BookLvr Gold

    I only need an escort (or perhaps written directions) if there is something very counter-intuitive about the layout or the way the room features work.

    We once stayed in a hotel where I could not for the life of me figure out how to turn on the shower. I had to call down to the front desk to get advice on this topic. Ideally, of course, hotels might want to hire designers who understand that...

    I only need an escort (or perhaps written directions) if there is something very counter-intuitive about the layout or the way the room features work.

    We once stayed in a hotel where I could not for the life of me figure out how to turn on the shower. I had to call down to the front desk to get advice on this topic. Ideally, of course, hotels might want to hire designers who understand that guests want things like "How do you turn on the shower?" and "How do you turn on the lights?" to be fairly straightforward. Nonetheless, in a certain percentage of hotels, an explanation of how things work might be useful.

    Other than that...I can generally find my room from the lobby just fine.

    1. Matt Guest

      The bigger issue is why hotels have counterintuitive features or necessities in their guest rooms…

  8. Samo Guest

    God no, I want as little contact with staff as possible. Give me my key and let me go.

    In my view, staff should always be available to deal with problems & requests, but never go above that. I'm not in a hotel to chit chat with anyone and as an adult, I'm perfectly fine walking to my room on my own. Leave me alone, I'll let you know if I need anything.

  9. TZ Guest

    I like the extra attention when I'm traveling with my wife. That's sort of my flex for being gone all the time traveling. If I'm by myself, I decline, including the we'll do the check in at the suite/room.

  10. PS Guest

    I would rather to go to the room by myself to avoid the awkward moment when tipping is somehow expected. Also, I like to detour here and there on the way to my room, especially when it is the first visit to that hotel.

  11. Schar Gold

    I applaud those in the hospitality industry that take pride in helping hotel guests with information, escorting them to their room, helping with bags, easing the check-in process, etc, all without expecting a tip or doing it just for a tip. True hospitality shines regardless of a tip.

    I absolutely hate US tipping culture, and like some commenters have stated, it ruins so many genuine hotel staff-guest encounters/relationships. Ugh.

  12. D3kingg Guest

    If a bellman escorts you to your room that’s a tipping situation . $6 is the new five due to inflation

  13. Oliver Guest

    I was once escorted to my room in Panama at a doubletree. And the guy showed me how to watch porn from TV...

  14. ycgcdg New Member

    I agree that I do not like being escorted to my room unless it is a sprawling layout e.g. Andaz Costa Rica and you are at the other end of the resort. We are seasoned travelers and usually travel with a carry-on bag and a tote, no I really do not need help with my luggage. If there is something special or unique about the room then by all means yes!

  15. DD Guest

    It depends on the property. We've even had our entire check-in done in our room after being escorted there. Other rooms you really did need a tour - how to work shutters/blinds, sound systems, steam room or other unique installations. Also on really sprawling properties it is a lot nicer than just handing you a map and leaving you to figure it out.

    1. Milos M. Guest

      Well. Its all about tipping. They certainly dont do that because they like you or job. In such situation I insist and take my own luggage to the room.
      If i was able to handle bag to hotel, why I would not be able to take it to room?

  16. Phillip Gold

    The other interesting fact, which I imagine is not the case in the US, is that in many parts of Europe and Asia in the past two years, hotel employees have not been allowed in the room due to Covid protocols anyway.

  17. Tom Guest

    More generally I almost never tip anyone in a hotel. The one exception might be in the hotel bar or restaurant, as that is no different from any bar or restaurant.

    As part of that I routinely ignore any requests for assistance.

  18. Wilhelm Guest

    I guess it’s a YMMV situation. Unless the hotel has a very confusing layout, I can easily find my own way. Otherwise I prefer going alone and carry my own bags. I’ve been in enough awkward situations in lifts with hotel employees escorting me. After a long flight I might be very tired and feel unwashed, and not comfortable being in close proximity of others lol.

    I hate tipping, and I think it would be...

    I guess it’s a YMMV situation. Unless the hotel has a very confusing layout, I can easily find my own way. Otherwise I prefer going alone and carry my own bags. I’ve been in enough awkward situations in lifts with hotel employees escorting me. After a long flight I might be very tired and feel unwashed, and not comfortable being in close proximity of others lol.

    I hate tipping, and I think it would be better if companies paid their employees properly. One thing that can cause very awkward situations is when you’ve just arrived in a foreign country and gotten cash out of the ATM at the airport. I arrived in NY once, and the smallest bill I had was a twenty. There’s no way I’m giving someone that much money to bring a bag I could easily take myself. I ended up apologising for not having any cash, which was a white lie.

    Many times, bellboys have jumped at the taxi and run off with the bags before I’ve been able to stop them. Sometimes I’ve had to run after them because my passport or other important items needed for check in was in it.

  19. Phillip Guest

    We’re also making the assumption that a front office associate is better paid and doesn’t rely on tips like a bellperson would. Is that a fair assumption? At least on a worldwide scale?

  20. Stanley Morris Guest

    I like this in Japan, and in other countries where tipping is not the norm.

  21. JT Guest

    I'm pretty annoyed if I don't get escorted to the room at a five-star property. I expect it.

  22. Morgan Diamond

    I agree, it is so stupid of course people will be able to find their room, its a hotel with numbers on the doors in a building not a maze.

  23. Emily Guest

    No. I can find my own way. I like my own privacy while I inspect the condition of the room and bedding. The staff are only a phone call away if necessary.

  24. Creditian Guest

    Intercontinental Hong Kong (soon to be Regent) basically escorts every guest to their room, no matter their elite status, which you won't experience in US.

    Besides, they would reject any tip from you, which you won't experience in US.

  25. TheBestBlackBrent Gold

    I have no issues with escorts in my hotel room.

    Ow, wait...this was not the topic of the post?!

  26. Jim Guest

    Looks like most of the commenters are men who hopefully respect women. Picture yourself a woman who checks into a hotel late at night. After they get their room key, they fear having to share an elevator alone with a drunken man returning to their room from the hotel bar. That would be a terrifying experience. Rape is real. A hotel provided escort making sure they get to their room safely would be well appreciated.

    1. BigG Guest

      In what world should a women be allowed to travel on their own? That comment is just as stupid as your comment Jim .

    2. Samo Guest

      And this problem only exists during check-in and not on subsequent nights of the stay?

  27. Ray Gold

    This is written as if you have never traveled outside of the US. Not all things are so simple. For example: first time to a European hotel, the US traveler asks for one key, not realizing a second one is good to have to keep electricity on while going to gym and charging devices. In Italy, nothing ever works properly or that simple wifi login isn't always so easy. I would imagine there are tons...

    This is written as if you have never traveled outside of the US. Not all things are so simple. For example: first time to a European hotel, the US traveler asks for one key, not realizing a second one is good to have to keep electricity on while going to gym and charging devices. In Italy, nothing ever works properly or that simple wifi login isn't always so easy. I would imagine there are tons of over-entitled 30+ year olds that end up calling to figure out how to turn on lights, work the showers, or even locate their room on the grounds.

  28. Randy Gold

    Some Luxury hotels in Asia, escort you immediately to your room upon arrival and do the checked in the room.
    Then if you don't like the room they can immediately move you.

  29. Larry Guest

    Interesting issue but I think you need to clarify who is "escorting" you. If you have a ton of luggage and a bell person is rolling it on a cart, then yeah it's okay for him to accompany you because he has to enter the room anyway to unload. The extra "orientation" speeches however are almost always useless and annoying. In fact getting luggage assistance at all is almost always useless and annoying. I have...

    Interesting issue but I think you need to clarify who is "escorting" you. If you have a ton of luggage and a bell person is rolling it on a cart, then yeah it's okay for him to accompany you because he has to enter the room anyway to unload. The extra "orientation" speeches however are almost always useless and annoying. In fact getting luggage assistance at all is almost always useless and annoying. I have stayed at some properties in pedestrian areas with no access, so having luggage assistance to lug suitcases long distances over cobblestones can come in handy. For a normal property, it is a bit ridiculous to assume that guests can't push their suitcase a few more final yards of their journey to get on the elevator and from there into the room. Also I generally hate surrendering my luggage for assistance when I arrive because it often means a delay getting it up to the room if it comes separately. An extra ten minutes waiting for your clean clothes to arrive after a twenty hour journey is not helpful.

    OTOH if you mean that someone from the front desk makes a special trip just to walk with you and chat and explain important things like how to turn on the lights, no that's almost always superfluous and annoying.

    As for tips, I increasingly don't give them except for cases of "above and beyond the call of duty" and just can't be bothered to struggle with whether I should feel guilty or not. And who even has the right currency and cash amounts when you arrive? One ridiculous situation that I run into a lot is that something is missing from our room when we arrive and then I have to call the front desk to have it brought up. The staff member who brings me the towels or robe or whatever sometimes pauses or smiles awkwardly expecting a tip-- for fixing a problem that the hotel created by not having the room equipped in the first place. They always get a thank you but nothing more.

    As for the commenter below handing out 20 euro notes left and right, let me know next time. I'd gladly lift up your suitcase for one of those.

  30. Justin Guest

    I'm with Ben on this one in terms of the nuances. As an introvert I don't really like the prospect of awkward chit chat for the walk to the room with an employee and don't feel its necessary in most cases. However, as Ben said, there are instances with a sprawling resort or a complex property layout where an escort might actually be helpful.

    In addition, there are certain luxury experiences where the walk...

    I'm with Ben on this one in terms of the nuances. As an introvert I don't really like the prospect of awkward chit chat for the walk to the room with an employee and don't feel its necessary in most cases. However, as Ben said, there are instances with a sprawling resort or a complex property layout where an escort might actually be helpful.

    In addition, there are certain luxury experiences where the walk adds to the "high-touch" service and experience, especially if it's in a culture with no tipping expectation (the tipping awkwardness really ruins a lot of service exchanges IMO). Like in Japan, I recall being personally escorted to and from dinner at a small modern luxury hotel (Hiramatsu Atami) which felt over-the-top but in an elegant way.

    I was escorted to my room after check-in at the large Fairmont Banff Springs in Canada as my room was in a far flung wing, so it was helpful, but it was also very nice that when I offered a tip the gentleman said "no thank you". So it really felt like a genuine service instead of a play for a tip.

  31. YULtide Gold

    P.S. Really loving the Trending Now pop up.

    Not!

  32. Tracey kenney Guest

    Heck no. I occasionally travel on my own, middle aged american married female. I dont need some dude "showing" me my room and wondering if I'm a mark, if I'm travelling with somebody, when they will turn up. For me, it's a strong security issue. I often put my husbands name on reservation to keep staff guessing. Also I think it's a money grab. No, thank you.

  33. Andy Guest

    Unless the hotel has really a very special layout (e.g. villas somewhere in the jungle), I'm always declining. And if they insist, no tip.

    1. Creditian Guest

      Many countries don't take tip, leaving your cheap US culture in US.

  34. Alan Guest

    It's just yet another example of the ludicrous tipping culture. I always say no and have never felt guilted/forced into it. I've got my bags from my house to the airport to the hotel, I think I'll manage to the room! The sooner tipping stops the better.

  35. Robert Guest

    For women, I can understand this after dark, but it would also say something about hotel security if such a practice were necessary. A male associate escorting a woman might also be creepy. For a male traveler, it seems unnecessary unless, like you said, you need to hop a golf cart or a junket, or other marine vessel, to get to your room.

  36. MikeyInOregon Guest

    No, thanks. I am a private person and I don't want anyone to escort me to my room, I don't think I'll be lost in a hotel.

  37. AndrewChen Guest

    I always feel that they want to generate tip business for the employees, just like David Larry’s video scene. Last October, I was checking in St. Regis Venice, I was escorted to my room like like, and I felt compelled to hand out two 20 euros notes to the concierge and the luggage dude, considering that I was paying 1000 euro per night there….sigh!

  38. Debo Member

    For a regular city hotel or even luxury property, I always say "no thanks". Only time I accept is when at a luxury beach/vacation property that might have a unique layout. Most recent example was EDITION Bodrum, built into a hill, minimal signage (by design). Was great to get a golf cart ride down the hill, know exactly where to go and get help with luggage.

  39. Adrienne Guest

    I find this thread interesting; we have a small boutique hotel with several buildings in a small town in Alaska. We always guide our guests to their rooms without ever expecting a tip. It’s just part of our hospitality. I always bring a town map with us to give them and on the way we talk about where the beach access is, restaurants and we answer any questions they may have. In 20 years I...

    I find this thread interesting; we have a small boutique hotel with several buildings in a small town in Alaska. We always guide our guests to their rooms without ever expecting a tip. It’s just part of our hospitality. I always bring a town map with us to give them and on the way we talk about where the beach access is, restaurants and we answer any questions they may have. In 20 years I don’t remember any awkwardness. It’s also another way to ensure our guests are happy with their room or if something might be out of order and needs attention. It’s rare but it can happen. On the other hand about 50% of our guests come back and many stay in their favorite room each time, so if they say, “we are good, We know the way” we don’t push it and just ask them to please let us know if you need anything at all. However, I believe most of them enjoy catching up on how the fishing or other things have been since the last time they stayed as we guide them to their room. We believe all our visitors should leave feeling like a local, but after reading this I’ll try to be more aware of any “awkwardness”. I hope this lends some perspective as to “why” as it’s pretty common in our area.

  40. Paul Guest

    If your are concerned about traveling alone, and the desk clerk loudly queries you about how many keys you want...ask for two keys. Let them think you are not alone. Ask a question on info that assumes you are with a partner or work group. Like dining or gathering for drinks, etc.

  41. dander Guest

    Some women and others want an escort to the room and also to make sure someone is not lurking in the room. I can see it as a safety ieeus

  42. AA Guest

    if you offer, I'm going to decline. If you insist and won't take no for an answer, then go nuts, but you aren't getting a tip, because I rarely have any cash on me whatsoever.
    And I can & will carry my own damn bags.

  43. Grey Gold

    When check-in is performed in the room, then it makes sense, and can be nice, in case it is a country where they must check passports and takes a few minutes. If it is a large resort and your room is more than about 100 metres away horizontally, and they have a golf cart, then also generally appreciate the assistance. But in a normal city hotel with check-in at the desk, I don't really see an advantage of having someone take me to the room.

  44. Anmol Guest

    The better one is, in room check-in.

    Ritz Carlton Hong Kong did that when we stayed there, the bellman called the front desk. The front desk was waiting as we exit the elevator with our room keys and a folio. We head to the room, she sits us down, puts everything on the table and just says if you want to make it faster, you can give me your passport/ credit card and I'll check you in downstairs. Meanwhile here is everything about your stay and benefits.

    1. Creditian Guest

      In Hong Kong, not necessary to be luxury, many hotels do check you in at your room with tablet or mobile devices.

      Some banquet hotels save the space of lobby by in-room check in.

  45. Nightliner Guest

    Escorting is part of the brand standards of many luxury brands (as in "must be offered at check in") and usually, besides assisting with bags/property layout etc. an opportunity to gain some info through chatting the guest up. Also, for the more boutique-y properties with a "story", usually that story will be told amongst all the usual info about services available etc pp.

    A word on tipping: generally agree with Ben with regards to "tip...

    Escorting is part of the brand standards of many luxury brands (as in "must be offered at check in") and usually, besides assisting with bags/property layout etc. an opportunity to gain some info through chatting the guest up. Also, for the more boutique-y properties with a "story", usually that story will be told amongst all the usual info about services available etc pp.

    A word on tipping: generally agree with Ben with regards to "tip if physical assistance with baggage was provided". However, if the interaction with the employee was helpful, they will appreciate a tip as much as they might appreciate a "thank you" :) bear in mind that in many countries (western Europe for instance) bellmen are paid almost as "good" (or bad) as receptionists, so if you deem tipping "necessary" as in "that employee doesn't make enough money through his employer", by any means, that applies to any waiter/receptionist/bellman/housekeeper as all of them will be paid quite close to the minimum wage.
    Besides knowing that people depend on tips sometimes, I usually think of it as a tangible and very universal way of saying "thank you", so I usually don't think twice about tipping someone who did something well.

  46. Donna Diamond

    If they want to escort me, I’m fine with it and I always tip.

  47. Stephen Guest

    For security reasons I think it is a good idea. There are times people have walked in and there are guest already sleeping, there are times my key doesn’t work and I have to go back to the desk, there are times the tv doesn’t work or there are no towels. All this can be taken care of by the escort and a new key can be delivered to the room

  48. Santos Guest

    Only time this has been an issue for me was at the Sofitel in Hanoi. Lovely young employee insisted on escorting me to the room and then there was a palpable pause before she left. Didn't think it was for a tip, considering the country and the culture. Didn't think it was sexual considering the property and the fact that I am about 25 years her senior. But it definitely left an odd impression. Thankfully...

    Only time this has been an issue for me was at the Sofitel in Hanoi. Lovely young employee insisted on escorting me to the room and then there was a palpable pause before she left. Didn't think it was for a tip, considering the country and the culture. Didn't think it was sexual considering the property and the fact that I am about 25 years her senior. But it definitely left an odd impression. Thankfully I was jet lagged as hell and only staying 1 night, so I didn't really pay it much mind.

  49. George Romey Guest

    Not really. It just means another person to tip. I remember during COVID when AA showed up at a gate at DFW (I was PP I think at the time) with my name printed on a sheet and a cart waiting. The very nice woman asked did I need to a ride to the AC. No thank you. I had a couple of drinks inflight and needed to work off the booze. Although it was a surprise getting the CK treatment.

  50. DLPTATL Guest

    I've only been escorted <10% of the time (excluding the "let me help you with your luggage" shake-down). In (nearly) all instances I think it added value. Here are a few examples:

    Jw Marriott Marquis Miami Hotel Beaux Arts - Explained the really complicated B&O tv/sound system, electric drapes, lighting controls, etc.
    Gritti Palace - Explained the antiques, how to operate the windows (should be simple, no???)
    Westin St John - Golf-cart ride...

    I've only been escorted <10% of the time (excluding the "let me help you with your luggage" shake-down). In (nearly) all instances I think it added value. Here are a few examples:

    Jw Marriott Marquis Miami Hotel Beaux Arts - Explained the really complicated B&O tv/sound system, electric drapes, lighting controls, etc.
    Gritti Palace - Explained the antiques, how to operate the windows (should be simple, no???)
    Westin St John - Golf-cart ride up the hill to the villa, explained kitchen, washer/dryer, etc.
    St Regis NYC - Explained butler service, in-room coffee, perks included in resort fee like museum tickets (this one did feel a bit like a tip shake-down, but with some value-add)
    The Boulders - Golf-cart ride to casita, explained golf-cart service, how to have your fireplace started, etc.

  51. Joey Diamond

    The only time I was escorted to my room/villa was because the hotel/resort was spread out and check-in happened inside the suite. I didn't mind at all. If anything, it was great since the room smelled like someone just smoked in there and the associate obviously can smell it too so they gave me a free upgrade to another villa. I'll admit that at the time, I didn't even think of giving a tip (it wasn't in the USA.)

  52. K4 Guest

    I do not know my way around a new hotel, and don't want to be peeking around every corner.
    I have been taken (not escorted) to my room 99% of the time.
    I usually leave my luggage at the front door with the porters when I arrive, so has no relevance to the check in itself.
    The one time I was not taken to my room, felt extremely weird.
    This was...

    I do not know my way around a new hotel, and don't want to be peeking around every corner.
    I have been taken (not escorted) to my room 99% of the time.
    I usually leave my luggage at the front door with the porters when I arrive, so has no relevance to the check in itself.
    The one time I was not taken to my room, felt extremely weird.
    This was the Four Seasons Toronto of all places. I actually had to queue to check in (at a supposed premium hotel), and then I was given the keys and that was it. I did not even ask why I was just left there with some key cards, but suffice to say I did not even know which elevator to take.
    Most of my travel isn't to North America, so perhaps it's seen as optional to actually take someone to their room in NA, but in most of the rest of the world it really isn't.
    Wandering around looking for things, and lost, isn't really my idea of ok.

    1. Clem Diamond

      "I did not even ask why I was just left there with some key cards, but suffice to say I did not even know which elevator to take."

      Just...wow :D. Reading this comment immediately reminded me of Schitts Creek, when they first arrive at the motel asking about the spa and room service (if you know you know).

      In case you are not joking, I assume you are only staying at Four Seasons, Mandarin...

      "I did not even ask why I was just left there with some key cards, but suffice to say I did not even know which elevator to take."

      Just...wow :D. Reading this comment immediately reminded me of Schitts Creek, when they first arrive at the motel asking about the spa and room service (if you know you know).

      In case you are not joking, I assume you are only staying at Four Seasons, Mandarin Oriental and the likes. But I can assure you that it is not standard to be taken to your room in the vast majority of the hotels of the world, not just North America. This is normally only done in rather premium properties.

      As for me, I don't care being escorted or not. If they offer it, i usually say yes without really thinking about it.

    2. Eskimo Guest

      @K4

      Have you ever use public transportation once in your lifetime?
      How about the airport?
      Or even school or college?

      If you can't figure out a hotel elevator how did you even manage to find anything else?

    3. K4 Guest

      I could try different elevators, but I don’t really want to look like an idiot, once I’m shown once that’s fine.

    4. Samo Guest

      Well, in Europe it's definitely seen as optional and luckily I never experienced anyone trying to escort me to my room here (those few times I had that experience in Asia were a major PITA). Information on where the elevator is, and possibly which elevator is the closest to my room, is almost always given at check-in and that's it (if they don't, I just ask, unless it's obvious). Most hotels ask for my ID...

      Well, in Europe it's definitely seen as optional and luckily I never experienced anyone trying to escort me to my room here (those few times I had that experience in Asia were a major PITA). Information on where the elevator is, and possibly which elevator is the closest to my room, is almost always given at check-in and that's it (if they don't, I just ask, unless it's obvious). Most hotels ask for my ID so they know I'm a big boy capable of finding my room with that information.

  53. MoJoe Diamond

    We're generally independent travelers and don't need all the premium service touches, but having a Hyatt hostess escort us to the room turned out to be super handy at the Park Hyatt Sydney (in 2016). When we arrived at our room, she used the key to open the door and, lo and behold, another guest was already there! After a brief exchange, she apologized and walked us back down to the desk for another room.

    ...

    We're generally independent travelers and don't need all the premium service touches, but having a Hyatt hostess escort us to the room turned out to be super handy at the Park Hyatt Sydney (in 2016). When we arrived at our room, she used the key to open the door and, lo and behold, another guest was already there! After a brief exchange, she apologized and walked us back down to the desk for another room.

    Having the host(ess) open the door helped avoid what would have been a personally awkward/embarrassing situation for us if we had entered the room by ourselves.

    1. ELW Guest

      I had a similar situation at the Waldorf Astoria in NYC, except I had just arrived in my room and was in the bathroom when I heard the door to the room open. It was a female guest (no escort), who was clearly as shocked as I was by being assigned the same room.

      We both went down to the front desk and vigorously questioned the Waldorf’s security protocols, given the certainly awkward and...

      I had a similar situation at the Waldorf Astoria in NYC, except I had just arrived in my room and was in the bathroom when I heard the door to the room open. It was a female guest (no escort), who was clearly as shocked as I was by being assigned the same room.

      We both went down to the front desk and vigorously questioned the Waldorf’s security protocols, given the certainly awkward and potentially unsafe mix-up.

      As a result, we both got new upgraded rooms and got a gift certificate for one-night at the hotel.

  54. DenB Diamond

    On the one hand, the hostility some have expressed surprises me. Is it reasonable? I'm skeptical. "Nobody must touch my luggage cuz COVID"?

    On the other hand I've said before (and been shaded for saying it) in comparing JL F with CX F that I preferred the latter because they sensed when I didn't want all the "Look! Look! I'm serving you I'm serving you" chatter, either because I am gazing out the window enjoying...

    On the one hand, the hostility some have expressed surprises me. Is it reasonable? I'm skeptical. "Nobody must touch my luggage cuz COVID"?

    On the other hand I've said before (and been shaded for saying it) in comparing JL F with CX F that I preferred the latter because they sensed when I didn't want all the "Look! Look! I'm serving you I'm serving you" chatter, either because I am gazing out the window enjoying my thoughts, or reading a book. If my glass is almost empty or I've finished with my appetizer, do we really have to talk to each other? On CX I looked at my empty glass and it was full. Sometimes I honestly don't know how they did it. Spooky and brilliant. This issue seems similar: true luxury includes telepathy, the height of KYC.

    My wish for a solution: "We take pride in our hospitality, Ms Guest. Will you allow the bellman to escort you to your room and give you a brief orientation?" After that, I agree, No Means No.

  55. RCB Guest

    Normally I am one who would hate something like this, but it's happened to us twice and I actually really appreciated it. The first time was at the Ritz-Carlton Abu Dhabi and we were escorted up by a lobby host and she showed us all the features of the room, which was nice and didn't at all feel awkward.

    The other time was at the Taj Palace in Mumbai, we had just arrived on...

    Normally I am one who would hate something like this, but it's happened to us twice and I actually really appreciated it. The first time was at the Ritz-Carlton Abu Dhabi and we were escorted up by a lobby host and she showed us all the features of the room, which was nice and didn't at all feel awkward.

    The other time was at the Taj Palace in Mumbai, we had just arrived on a long connecting flight from the States, it was 1 am, and we were exhausted. When we arrived they opened the door of the car, greeted us by name, and said "It's way too late for you to mess with the check-in desk, we'll escort you directly to your room", which they did and it was just nice not to have to figure anything out when I was so tired.

    True Luxury properties execute this well and it's not awkward at all.

  56. Jerry Diamond

    In North America it is entirely a money grab. Everyone would agree that tipping a person bringing bags to your room on your request is appropriate, but forced assistance with bags along with an onslaught of useless information is done with motive in mind, and it isn't to make you feel warmly welcomed. Mexico really loves this move.

    1. John S Guest

      I can vouch for everything you said, especially the Mexico part. Having just returned from PV, it was especially blatant and annoying.

  57. skimegheath Gold

    As a general rule no - I cannot stand it. However when I used to travel to Mumbai every 2 weeks, the hotel staff would meet at the door, take me through the bell desk lift and straight to my room. They would get me to sign may check in form and leave. After travelling for 20 hours and arriving at 2am (my "home" time not Mumbai time) it was awesome to avoid the security...

    As a general rule no - I cannot stand it. However when I used to travel to Mumbai every 2 weeks, the hotel staff would meet at the door, take me through the bell desk lift and straight to my room. They would get me to sign may check in form and leave. After travelling for 20 hours and arriving at 2am (my "home" time not Mumbai time) it was awesome to avoid the security lines and long check in queues. Any other time I hate it. I prefer to carry my bag and go straight to my room. It is not about tipping, I have generally travelled for several hours and just want to go straight to my room and avoid waiting for bags etc.

  58. MoGreen Guest

    Only time I enjoyed the room escort is When i travelled frequently to China and was a Shangri-La Diamond Member.
    The staff would greet me at the door and head straight to the room and check-in happened in the elevator on an iPad.
    Nothing was better after a long flight

  59. ECR12 Guest

    I'll generally agree I have no desire to be escorted. One time it did prove useful was at the Waldorf in Cabo back last September. We were staying off property at the Cape, but were offered to be escorted to El Farallon (the restaurant) for dinner. Half the resort was a construction zone at the time and it would have been a long walk through a somewhat tricky route in the dark had we not gotten that offer, but the hotel seemed very well run.

  60. Mike Guest

    I do not see any problem with this - I think the problem is you believe that a tip is always expected, which is not the case.
    If there's a reason to get escorted to the room or anyway - be it at a hotel, airport (because you are in First or Elite/Status member) - it should be accepted graciously without any other motive or expectation behind the person offering it.

    1. Eskimo Guest

      I have no problem with this too, escort or not.

      The problem arises when tip is expected. If I accept it graciously and don't tip while someone is expecting it. I don't even want to think if that someone holds grudge on me during my stay would affect nothing at all.

      Like I said, tipping culture ruins everything.

  61. Eskimo Guest

    As we can all see from the comments.

    Tipping culture ruins everything.

  62. LarryInNYC Diamond

    I imagine that, at least at some places, it's a brand standard issue. On post-checkout surveys, is there ever a question about whether you were escorted to your room, shown how the lights operated, or assisted with your baggage?

    It's certainly true that at one time this was completely customary at any hotel of sufficient quality.

    If you base your decision to accept the escort or not on how difficult it is to find the...

    I imagine that, at least at some places, it's a brand standard issue. On post-checkout surveys, is there ever a question about whether you were escorted to your room, shown how the lights operated, or assisted with your baggage?

    It's certainly true that at one time this was completely customary at any hotel of sufficient quality.

    If you base your decision to accept the escort or not on how difficult it is to find the room, how do you know that before actually going to the room?

  63. uldguy Diamond

    The correct response to “I insist” is a firm “I said no” followed by showing them your ass and elbows walking away.

    1. Samo Guest

      The correct response to "I insist" is "I insist too" ;)

  64. Alex Guest

    We were escorted to our room in Gritti Palace and the hostess gave us ino on the antiquities in our room. That was pretty fun as otherwise we would never have known the value and history of the aniquities.

    1. DLPTATL Diamond

      Love the Gritti Palace both times we were fortunate enough to stay. In both cases just came in from a red-eye so the help finding our room and a brief intro was much appreciated.

  65. JP Guest

    Wow...my post got an article, feel kinda special :D

    Please don't take it that I think the guidance to the room is completely useless, as some have said, if assistance/safety is a concern, I have no doubt that the service is warranted and tipping would be highly appreciated (to be honest, if you clearly need help and you don't end up tipping for whatever reason, I don't think a reasonable staff will feel short changed...

    Wow...my post got an article, feel kinda special :D

    Please don't take it that I think the guidance to the room is completely useless, as some have said, if assistance/safety is a concern, I have no doubt that the service is warranted and tipping would be highly appreciated (to be honest, if you clearly need help and you don't end up tipping for whatever reason, I don't think a reasonable staff will feel short changed for helping you). As someone who grew up and lived in Asia, the whole tipping etiquette is just baffling even after extensive research and years of travel because each staff is different.

    I think the general gist of the comments from others (Thanks everyone!) is those moments where you've refused (sometimes multiple times) and they still insist, then they go through the TV, bathroom etc like it's the first time I've used such items.

    For those moments where I need additional things or have questions, normally, I just ring and ask once I am comfortably settled, in exchange, I make an effort to find the right person to tip.

  66. Kendor Guest

    Yet another reason I like travel in China, where there is not a culture of tipping and indeed in some contexts it is seen as quite insulting. If a waiter, bellman, or other person is friendly and provides a service, in most cases it is because they are friendly and want to provide you a service, not because they hope to mine you for tips. America's ever-escalating tipping culture is corrosive to our relationships and...

    Yet another reason I like travel in China, where there is not a culture of tipping and indeed in some contexts it is seen as quite insulting. If a waiter, bellman, or other person is friendly and provides a service, in most cases it is because they are friendly and want to provide you a service, not because they hope to mine you for tips. America's ever-escalating tipping culture is corrosive to our relationships and connections to people in the public sphere: you can never be quite sure why someone is being nice to you, and you can never be quite sure if you're satisfying their expectations for providing you quality service, conversation, good cheer, or undesired and insincere flirtation.

    1. tuotuo Member

      Speaking as someone who lives in China.
      The problem is that many frontline workers in the service industry are not friendly and want to provide you good service. (at least 10%)
      In this situation a tipping culture might make them at least pretend to be friendly.

    2. Kendor Guest

      Speaking as someone in America:
      In America many of the frontline workers are not friendly and work in restaurants that are massively understaffed, unlike China. So you often get surly, indifferent, incompetent service and the tip is nonetheless all but obligatory.

      I consistently get better service from the untipped workers in China than I do from frontline workers harvesting their 20%+ in the USA.

      I'd rather get the unfriendly service with no strings...

      Speaking as someone in America:
      In America many of the frontline workers are not friendly and work in restaurants that are massively understaffed, unlike China. So you often get surly, indifferent, incompetent service and the tip is nonetheless all but obligatory.

      I consistently get better service from the untipped workers in China than I do from frontline workers harvesting their 20%+ in the USA.

      I'd rather get the unfriendly service with no strings attached than the fake friendliness/weird flirtation I get in the USA. If someone's having a bad day in China at least I'll figure that out, and maybe I can work to improve their day a bit for them. In China the staff are often very open and friendly, and it is nice to figure out in most cases there is no agenda attached to that.

  67. Santastico Gold

    Of course the tip is expected but I agree with your comment about being escorted to my room on big resorts or in special occasions. I stayed with my family at the Blue Palace in Crete. There was no way I would be able to find my room alone. You need to get a funicular to get there so escort was very helpful. Same in Barcelona where I was upgrade to the penthouse of the...

    Of course the tip is expected but I agree with your comment about being escorted to my room on big resorts or in special occasions. I stayed with my family at the Blue Palace in Crete. There was no way I would be able to find my room alone. You need to get a funicular to get there so escort was very helpful. Same in Barcelona where I was upgrade to the penthouse of the Arts Hotel. You needed to take two separate elevators and then go through a special concierge to get to the room. Escort was needed. Now, when I am alone and have a carry on on a typical Hyatt, Sheraton, etc.. nobody even offer escort service anymore.

  68. richyjoye New Member

    Funny thing is that in high-end luxury hotel I find that such services are provided without any tipping expectation. It's part of the service... and 4, 5 people will help / escort you (taxi, the car, luggage, escort to your room). At least in Europe and Asia. Would you tip at the Ritz in Tokyo ? no. Maybe yes in a Marriott in L.A... that's a cultural thing not something to do with the nature...

    Funny thing is that in high-end luxury hotel I find that such services are provided without any tipping expectation. It's part of the service... and 4, 5 people will help / escort you (taxi, the car, luggage, escort to your room). At least in Europe and Asia. Would you tip at the Ritz in Tokyo ? no. Maybe yes in a Marriott in L.A... that's a cultural thing not something to do with the nature of the service itself.

    In 2022 we live in a cashless world... I don't carry coins or small bills anymore. I won't tip. Or if the service is exceptional I will do it, even with a note, at the end of the stay. Did it on many occasions. But the basic tipping for escorting me to the room, no.

    And this goes also with airlines... (another topic though...) - someone escort you to your seat in business or first, in most of cases. Then someone comes to you to 'explain' the seat. Same as the room in the hotel. If you are familiar, you say no. Same with hotels. If you can and want to walk alone to your room or seat, say no. It's easy.

    1. Richard_ New Member

      Yes. My impression is that tipping is not expected in high-end luxury hotels in Europe and Asia for a front desk person escorting you to your room. In those hotels, your luggage is typically brought up while you are checking in, so tipping the person who brought it up is not usually an issue.

  69. Laura Guest

    As a woman who is often traveling alone, I hate when they escort me or even when the bellhop comes into my room to put down the bags, especially in hotels where the doors are set to close automatically instead of staying propped open. I always feel like even though it's unlikely that they would do anything, it's putting me in an uncomfortable and dangerous situation, especially in countries where women who do travel on their own are perceived as "loose".

    1. Tracey Kenney Guest

      Absolutely. Its shocking to me how many men are posting on the thread, most completely ignorant about female travel concerns.

  70. Khatl Diamond

    I don't get it. When I have been escorted, I dislike it. I find half the fun is figuring out what all the buttons do. I have the same issue with the hotel wanting to take my carry on bag when that's the only thing I have and it has wheels and is clearly light. Often I find the staff almost grabbing it out of my hand. Just simply ask if I'd like assistance.

  71. Shangster11 Guest

    Much ado about nothing. Again....it depends!
    In most of Asia, most luxury hotels will offer to escort you. If you are frequent/elite member, they will greet you at the door and check you in at the lounge, or room, with drinks appropriate for the occasion. Tipping is not expected and even shun upon.
    What is the big deal?

    1. richyjoye New Member

      Totally agree with you. Same in Europe. But I guess in the US is different... service provide = tip expected. Different economics and different culture.

  72. [email protected] Guest

    I'm surprised you would feel guilted into tipping if you declined twice and they still insist. I would interpret it in the opposite way: by declining twice you make it clear you are not interested in paying for the service they are offering. If they still insist on helping, I would interpret it as them being nice. If that was not their intent, they should have accepted the first or second refusal.

  73. Anthony Guest

    Even at bigger resorts like the Park Hyatt St. Kitts or Blue Palace in Crete. I flat out refuse the escort, golf cart, etc. I can walk and will walk. I don't travel with more than a one suitcase and a laptop bag. Totally unnecessary unless you have tons of luggage or mobility issues.

  74. Anthony Guest

    I stand my ground and tell them not to escort me. If they insist, I tell them that I flat out refuse and that they are not allowed in my room under any circumstances. I also tell hotels like the St. Regis that I do not want a butler, have no use of their services and that I want it noted that they are not allowed to enter the room. One recently came to my...

    I stand my ground and tell them not to escort me. If they insist, I tell them that I flat out refuse and that they are not allowed in my room under any circumstances. I also tell hotels like the St. Regis that I do not want a butler, have no use of their services and that I want it noted that they are not allowed to enter the room. One recently came to my room shortly after check in. I answered the door, told him his services were not needed, refused his business card, and shut the door. This service needs to go away as it is just another money grab.

  75. Ryan Guest

    Since I never carry cash (especially when I'm in a new country and just got to the hotel!), I will always, always push back against being escorted unless it's a massive property. It has definitely led to awkward situations.

    Something else that's led to awkward moments is that, in general but especially with COVID, I don't want anyone to touch my luggage. Staying at 5-star hotels, I've experiences employees who think they are being helpful...

    Since I never carry cash (especially when I'm in a new country and just got to the hotel!), I will always, always push back against being escorted unless it's a massive property. It has definitely led to awkward situations.

    Something else that's led to awkward moments is that, in general but especially with COVID, I don't want anyone to touch my luggage. Staying at 5-star hotels, I've experiences employees who think they are being helpful physically take the luggage from me (eve after I've said not to), and I've had to take it back.

  76. pstm91 Diamond

    There are varying degrees of this; it isn't really black and white. If it's a simple offer and a bellman doing it, then yes it's more of a "luxury" perk and to benefit them with tips.

    For a truly VIP stay, a manager will usually greet them and escort them to the room. This is different, and a sign of respect.

    The other perk of being escorted to the room is that they...

    There are varying degrees of this; it isn't really black and white. If it's a simple offer and a bellman doing it, then yes it's more of a "luxury" perk and to benefit them with tips.

    For a truly VIP stay, a manager will usually greet them and escort them to the room. This is different, and a sign of respect.

    The other perk of being escorted to the room is that they will usually show you where everything is. Personally, I find this a bit unnecessary but sometimes it is helpful, especially in hotels that are newer and have confusing buttons everywhere. Sidenote - why are they making window shades, lights, and other buttons in hotels so complicated. I tend to find these have so many issues or take forever to work...

  77. derek Guest

    A hotel escort may increase security if there are robberies in the hallway.

    Maybe play a joke with them? If they are the same sex as you, say "sorry, I am not gay and will not need your escort services" (even if you are gay). Or "Sorry, I'm gay (or lesbian) and will not need your escort services", if the escort is of the opposite sex.

    1. Justin Guest

      This is an AWFUL idea and the last thing hospitality workers need

  78. Airfarer Guest

    Ritz Carlton in Georgetown. If you don't let them escort you the first time, you will get lost.

  79. TM Gold

    This is just one of the many features baked in to the higher cost of luxury properties that I find completely useless. I don't like tipping for a service I didn't need in the first place and I am perfectly capable to take my bags and find the room myself. Sure, there are some large properties with multiple buildings that might be a little confusing, but even then I've had properties just give me a print out of the hotel layout or a welcome packet with directions.

  80. MildMidwesterner Member

    Word to the wise: Roadside motel escorts will get very angry if not tipped appropriately.

  81. JetSetGo Guest

    With luxury hotels, many things like curtains, etc. is automated. Sometimes buttons aren’t where you think they should be at. Last thing in the world I want to do on vacation is figure out how to open curtains, which remote goes with which machine, and where to find xyz. Also I like to hang all my clothes out and often times there isn’t enough hangers in closet (even though I’ve asked my travel agent to...

    With luxury hotels, many things like curtains, etc. is automated. Sometimes buttons aren’t where you think they should be at. Last thing in the world I want to do on vacation is figure out how to open curtains, which remote goes with which machine, and where to find xyz. Also I like to hang all my clothes out and often times there isn’t enough hangers in closet (even though I’ve asked my travel agent to request them months out). It’s easier to walk through the room with someone and request xyz in person than have to call and housekeeping whose English may not be the best.

  82. JoePro Guest

    Agreed. Tip if they're bringing your bags, don't tip otherwise.

    Never a needed service, and I'm pretty sure that I've only had it once within the States (P.H N.Y)

    Don't mind it, but don't think it's necessary.

  83. RetiredATLATC Diamond

    I think it's odd and awkward.

    We were in a very small hotel in Tbilisi this past Dec/Jan and arrived at 0430. The front desk clerk, who we had woken, insisted to take us to our room, though ours was the only room on the top floor. Very awkward, 3 people in a small elevator wearing masks and trying not to look at each other.

    Conversely, we always get escorted to our over-the-water...

    I think it's odd and awkward.

    We were in a very small hotel in Tbilisi this past Dec/Jan and arrived at 0430. The front desk clerk, who we had woken, insisted to take us to our room, though ours was the only room on the top floor. Very awkward, 3 people in a small elevator wearing masks and trying not to look at each other.

    Conversely, we always get escorted to our over-the-water bungalow in the Maldives and I don't find that weird or awkward. There's always things the concierge wants to go over with us and I'd rather do that in the nice a/c of our room.

    1. LarryInNYC Diamond

      On the other hand, perhaps the front desk clerk didn't want you wandering around a strange hotel at 4:30am (the flight schedules for Tbilisi really suck!) possibly trying to enter the wrong room.

    2. RetiredATLATC Diamond

      Possibly, but nah, he turned out to be just weird the entire trip.

      Agree about the flight times. Going back this new years on QR, and instead of arriving at 0430, we now arrive at 0400.

      I will say though, arriving at that time, after a few hours nap, you've got the whole day of cha cha drinking ahead.

  84. NSS Guest

    I like it sometimes in countries where rooms are typically automated, so I can learn how to work everything. Flying from NYC to SE Asia, getting to the room at 1 am and not being able to figure out how to turn off the lights or use the shower can be annoying. I don't mind tipping for that.

    1. VML Guest

      Why would you tip in SE Asia??? That's not expected nor appropriate.

    2. tuotuo Member

      Have you ever been to the Philippines Thailand Vietnam (especially the South) Malaysia (especially Kuala Lumpur) Cambodia (especially Sihanoukville) Indonesia (Bali)?

  85. Boogen Guest

    I appreciate it for older and larger hotels. Recently I was lost for 30 minutes trying to find my room at the Mena House in Cairo and totally lost trying to find my way back to the executive lounge. Another one is the Marriott Ocean Park Hong Kong. I'd still be wandering around now had not there been an escort.

  86. Alec Guest

    While I'll never use it I think maybe an elderly/disabled guest could use the assistance. Also hotels with guests used to having their drivers handle all the "heavy lifting" may prefer not to "lug" their suitcase.

  87. Margaret Koppen Guest

    I'm wondering if there is a safety aspect to this - as a female, traveling alone for business, I've occasionally accepted the escort for safety reasons (if a ton of men are hanging around the desk, or god forbid, the desk is near the bar and the (idiot) desk clear loudly asks how many keys I need). Mostly, they are angling for a tip though.

  88. James W Guest

    Maybe if you decline and include the phrase "I don't have any cash for a tip," they'll acquiesce and let you go alone.

    1. Alexf1 Member

      If they insist, at the end I thank them but explain I have no cash but thank them again. If they don't insist I take my own bags and tip becomes irrelevant.

      I don't believe service should be forced on anyone.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

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Justin Guest

This is an AWFUL idea and the last thing hospitality workers need

5
RCB Guest

Normally I am one who would hate something like this, but it's happened to us twice and I actually really appreciated it. The first time was at the Ritz-Carlton Abu Dhabi and we were escorted up by a lobby host and she showed us all the features of the room, which was nice and didn't at all feel awkward. The other time was at the Taj Palace in Mumbai, we had just arrived on a long connecting flight from the States, it was 1 am, and we were exhausted. When we arrived they opened the door of the car, greeted us by name, and said "It's way too late for you to mess with the check-in desk, we'll escort you directly to your room", which they did and it was just nice not to have to figure anything out when I was so tired. True Luxury properties execute this well and it's not awkward at all.

4
Alex Guest

We were escorted to our room in Gritti Palace and the hostess gave us ino on the antiquities in our room. That was pretty fun as otherwise we would never have known the value and history of the aniquities.

3
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