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Answers (2)

Airline plane switch-out in Europe

Airline plane switch-out in Europe

  1. Anonymous

    Hi Lucky,

    I recently flew several flights on SAS. On two of the flights, from Reykjavik – Copenhagen and from Copenhagen – Munich, SAS switched the plane to a contract air, Jettime. Instead of being an SAS A321 with comfortable seating, it is a 737-700 with very uncomfortable seating.

    I feel like this is equivalent to fraud on the part of SAS. On my ticket/itinerary SAS showed the A321, yet they switched to this “fill-in” airline (I would suppose due to lack of planes/capacity). To me this is the same as buying a full-service ticket on Lufthansa and instead LH decided to put me on Eurowings. To have this happen once was not acceptable, but it happened twice in the same week (with even the same crew on the plane).

    What are you thoughts? I have already written the airline and want their response first, but I am thinking about pursuing this with the European travel authorities.

    Thanks!
    Robert H.

  2. rickyw

    In the US, aircraft swaps typically aren’t even enough justification to enable the airline to change a ticket without fees, so as a US-based flyer, I wouldn’t expect much to come from SAS.

    I think your difficulty with claiming the inconvenience was primarily from an uncomfortable seat is that is extremely subjective. If SAS had wi-fi, seatback entertainment, extra legroom, etc. – that is something tangible that could potentially be argued and I would base your complaint around that (if it is true).

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