Finally: Park Hyatt Tokyo Closing For Renovation In 2024

Finally: Park Hyatt Tokyo Closing For Renovation In 2024

34

Here’s a long overdue and very exciting announcement…

Park Hyatt Tokyo closing in May 2024

As reported by Japan Today, the Park Hyatt Tokyo will be undergoing a full renovation, including of public areas and guest rooms. The hotel will be suspending operations on May 7, 2024, and anticipates reopening in the second quarter of 2025.

The hotel first opened in 1994, so this coincides with the property’s 30th anniversary. While there aren’t yet renderings of what the new property will look like, we’re told to expect a fresh, modern feel to the hotel. The hotel currently has 200 accommodations, including 177 rooms and 23 suites.

Design agency Jouin Manku will lead the renovation, and has released the following statement about the plans for the property:

“We are sincerely grateful that our studio has been given the rare opportunity to renovate Park Hyatt Tokyo and set the stage for this prestigious hotel’s much-anticipated future. We are excited to work with the hotel team to create a uniquely elegant design experience for guests, all in keeping with John Morford’s original vision. We thank the Park Hyatt Tokyo team for the trust they have placed in us.”

“As Park Hyatt Tokyo approaches its 30th anniversary next year, we are delighted to work with the wonderful team at Jouin Manku and our hotel’s associates to make this renewal a success,” said Fredrik Harfors, general manager of Park Hyatt Tokyo. “We are grateful for everyone’s patience and understanding as we embark on a journey to enhance the guest experience at our hotel. Drawing inspiration from the trailblazing legacy of Park Hyatt Tokyo, we are committed to creating an elevated atmosphere that will continue to shine as a beacon of understated luxury for decades to come.”

Park Hyatt Tokyo guest room

This is such an exciting development

The Park Hyatt Tokyo is such an iconic hotel, in particular because it appeared in many scenes of the movie “Lost in Translation.” So while it has been great that World of Hyatt members have had the opportunity to earn and redeem points here, the property has been in dire need of a renovation. In recent years, the hotel wasn’t just a little past its prime, but rather was very, very past its prime.

I’ve been wondering for quite some time when we’d see something announced, so it’s great to see that there are finally plans for things to change.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGvDCmuDKKE

It’s a shame that the hotel didn’t take the opportunity to undergo a renovation during the peak of the pandemic, when Japan’s borders were mostly closed to foreigners. Rather it’s happening shortly after Japan is seeing one of its biggest tourism booms ever.

Admittedly a lot of businesses have had the same issue — they just didn’t know how the pandemic would play out, and/or didn’t have the money (or didn’t want to spend the money) to make major changes.

At this point I think the real question is how many Hyatt points this property will cost by the time that it reopens, given the price increases we’ve seen at many Hyatts in recent years. 😉

The famous Park Hyatt Tokyo New York Bar

Bottom line

The Park Hyatt Tokyo will be closing in the spring of 2024 to undergo a full renovation, and will be reopening in the spring of 2025. I’m thrilled to hear this development, because this iconic hotel has been worth avoiding for quite some time. I can’t wait to check out the Park Hyatt Tokyo in a couple of years.

What do you make of the Park Hyatt Tokyo undergoing a renovation?

Conversations (34)
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  1. Beniols Guest

    Personally I hope the rooms lean more towards the expanding Suites to create rooms like the Chicago Ave (standard suite) at PH Chicago. Lighter, bigger baths, more warmth but optimal luxury. I am going to stay to bid farewell to the 90s black furniture and stained carpets in February. Albeit the bar has already closed so no toast to that view.

    1. Qi Guest

      Should not learn Park Hyatt in US, it should learn many Park Hyatt in China and Kyoto, the construction and design standards in Asia is always the best.

  2. Noah Guest

    This may be a sad development.

    Sure, the hotel could use a few enhancements, like freshening up the bathrooms (though they all have new toilets). However, I like the 90s feel, and appreciate that it feels the way it did in Lost in Translation. If that gets relegated to the past it becomes just another luxury hotel in Tokyo.

    Not everything has to be brand new.

    1. Omar Guest

      It doesn't feel the way it does in Lost in Translation. It was refurbished after that movie came out so they don't look the same.

  3. Stefan Guest

    If you consider the Park Hyatt Tokyo "very, very past it's prime" then you need a serious reality check.

    1. Andrew Diamond

      It looks like peak 1990s interior design. Sorry, there's no other way to say it.

    2. Stefan Guest

      That doesn't mean it's "very, very past its prime". It's simply a design feature. It would be a problem when it starts to be worn out, however all rooms and public areas at PHT are well maintained and constantly looked after. Service is top notch. You have other hotels that have 1/3 of the age on the clock and look like trash.

    3. Chas Guest

      What does this even mean beyond the tautological (ie it was built in the 1990s and the interior design was top quality)? What specific features of the interior design epitomize "peak 1990s" in your mind? And more importantly, what other 1990s properties have/had those features, which would be required to make them emblematic of an era?

    4. Charlie Diamond

      I agree, I’ve just stayed there and it’s still an amazing hotel and I didn’t feel like it’s was “very, very past its prime” or in “dire need of a renovation”. The rooms are all well maintained, everything works and is clean!

  4. Andrew Diamond

    Hotel will reopen as category 15, cost 13 bajillion points per night, and have zero award availability.

    Oh yeah, and suite upgrades won't apply because they learned from Andaz Tokyo that you can still make bank by ignoring the rules.

  5. Super Diamond

    "Past its prime" to me (and it seems to a couple other commenters) reads as not well taken care of, so I'd expect scuffed walls, dented furniture, etc. which is absolutely not the case for the Park Hyatt Tokyo. I think the word you're looking for is dated, as in the design was meant for bygone era.

    Design is obviously very subjective, but it seems I'm not alone in loving this pristine example of a...

    "Past its prime" to me (and it seems to a couple other commenters) reads as not well taken care of, so I'd expect scuffed walls, dented furniture, etc. which is absolutely not the case for the Park Hyatt Tokyo. I think the word you're looking for is dated, as in the design was meant for bygone era.

    Design is obviously very subjective, but it seems I'm not alone in loving this pristine example of a throwback to the 90's luxury of Tokyo. I really hope the redesign isn't generic - looking at Jouin Manku's work is very pretty so I'm optimistic.

    1. Robert D Guest

      To me, “past it’s prime” and “dated” are synonymous.

    2. Super Diamond

      It does seem to be a contentious topic in the comments! Funny how we all have such different opinions on what it means :)

  6. PCT Member

    I guess we all knew this was coming and I am cautiously optimistic; however, I truly will miss the original! Have had the pleasure of staying here at least 20 times starting back in 2010 and virtually every stay was flawless! We have enjoyed every suite including the Presidential and the room for our last stay back in OCT 2022 was immaculate. The views never get old and the spa and New York bar are...

    I guess we all knew this was coming and I am cautiously optimistic; however, I truly will miss the original! Have had the pleasure of staying here at least 20 times starting back in 2010 and virtually every stay was flawless! We have enjoyed every suite including the Presidential and the room for our last stay back in OCT 2022 was immaculate. The views never get old and the spa and New York bar are such great places to unwind after a busy day in Tokyo! Already planning our farewell trip…….

  7. Luvfclass Guest

    I have loved this place everytime I set foot in the front entrance, upon arrival. It truly is my go to place in TYO, the 4 times I have stayed here.

    I totally agree with many comments, of this place being "timeless". It truly is in my experience, and the soft product hospitality is off the charts amazing.

    Heading bad one final time in August for a couple of nights, and will wish NY Bar and her farewell, until spring 2025.

    She had me at, " Hello ".

  8. brianna hoffner Diamond

    Can they please move it closer to a subway station while they're at it? ;)

    1. Charlie Diamond

      They have a free shuttle to Shinjuku station, or it’s literally ¥800 on a taxi so whilst yes it would be good to be closer, I don’t view that as a big problem

  9. Pete Guest

    Peak demand dates don't mean that much to billionaire owners of hotels. The owner of Park Hyatt Sydney closed the entire hotel for 18 months while it had a gut renovation.

    I can't wait to see the final result of the renovation in Shinjuku. It really is such an icon, and the views make it hard to tear oneself from the window. I'm sure it will be fantastic!

  10. reddargon Diamond

    My one and only stay here was in 2014, so maybe it's gone way downhill since, but can someone please shed some light on why it was "very, very past its prime"? Sure, the decor doesn't look like many new modern hotels, but it was by no means ugly (I'd argue the opposite) and the room was very functional as well. The public spaces were great too. Maybe I care less about what's trendy than others, or maybe there was a lot of wear and tear in the past 9 years?

    1. mofly Guest

      It's still my number one choice in Tokyo the design is timeless and the hotel delivers a true senses of peace! It offers truly iconic design! I do not get this feeling from any of the newer hotels, even in Tokyo. It will be very difficult to re-create this in a modern form, but I hope they can.

  11. Chas Guest

    Well, we all knew this was coming at some point sooner than later. I'm sure many reading this blog are (in my opinion, naively) celebrating the coming change, but for longtime fans of this hotel, I view it as a huge risk. The big question of course: will they screw it up? I'm hopeful, but not optimistic on that front.

    From a design standpoint, this is not an ideal time to renovate; extreme minimalist...

    Well, we all knew this was coming at some point sooner than later. I'm sure many reading this blog are (in my opinion, naively) celebrating the coming change, but for longtime fans of this hotel, I view it as a huge risk. The big question of course: will they screw it up? I'm hopeful, but not optimistic on that front.

    From a design standpoint, this is not an ideal time to renovate; extreme minimalist uniformity dominates current tastes, and it isn't clear to me this trend is either lasting or attractive. Even at the highest end of luxury, most new and newly-renovated properties don't seem to have the long term in mind, be it from design choices (favoring trendy over timeless) or fit/finish itself (nominally expensive but "cheap" feeling furnishings used in rooms, etc). We can probably take solace in the fact that at least this property is in Japan, where culture has not allowed trendy design fads to take as strong a hold as elsewhere, but even that seems to be changing.

    The fact that the PHT has stood for 30 years with barely any design changes, even minor ones, is a testament to everything the designers got right originally: timeless over trendiness and understated over flashy. And that's not to mention the quality of the materials; it's only been in the past few years that reviewers have started to seriously complain about wear and tear at this property. And most importantly I've yet to see anyone credibly fault the now 30-year-old interior design aside from physical wear itself; those that do seem mostly to express contrarian/critical views for the sake of it.

    I worry that choosing a big name design firm here means the designers will want to express their creativity and "leave their mark." Hopefully they will realize that the way to leave a lasting mark on this timeless treasure of the travel world is to color within the lines; fix what's broken, not what isn't.

  12. JK Guest

    ..."the property has been in dire need of a renovation" is such an over-stated claim. It has been in need of a refresh, yes, but the hotel itself is pristine, the Japanese are very well known for keeping things tidy and in good working order. The building the PH is located in remains quite modern 30 years on the public spaces have continued to wow but the textiles and the carpet could do with some updates however it is not very very past its prime.

    1. NFSF Diamond

      The public spaces are amazing but the rooms leave a lot to be desired for their price.

  13. DC Guest

    +1 on the spinal tap references. But joke's on you, they just might make a Cat 11 for this place....

    I may be in the minority here, but even on my most recent stay in Oct- Nov 2022 I still really dug the place (although having a suite probably helped). I still enjoyed the old school decor and vibe to the place, and frankly the service, atmosphere (and spa) are the reasons to stay over...

    +1 on the spinal tap references. But joke's on you, they just might make a Cat 11 for this place....

    I may be in the minority here, but even on my most recent stay in Oct- Nov 2022 I still really dug the place (although having a suite probably helped). I still enjoyed the old school decor and vibe to the place, and frankly the service, atmosphere (and spa) are the reasons to stay over the decor.

    I hope they don't overdo the renovation; I think the recent Park Hyatt renos have been a little more "modern" than I appreciate.

    But that's an old guy talking, so take it with a grain of salt.

  14. Never In Doubt Guest

    Stayed there for a week+ in 1995.

    I think it’s the nicest big city business hotel I’ve ever stayed in.

  15. Matrix.RX1 Guest

    Japanese hotels have been fully booked during the pandemic. I recall seeing less than 20 hotels in all of Japan for Obon Week in August 2022 with several months notice. Also, these domestic luxury customers accepted sky high prices since their budgets would otherwise include long haul business/first flights.

    1. Matrix.RX1 Guest

      *seen on booking.com

  16. D3kingg Guest

    I’ll be in Tokyo next week . Wish I had enough time to have a drink here. At least I’ll get to see Godzilla.

  17. Eskimo Guest

    I hope PH doesn't get Lost in Renovation.

  18. noworkalltravel.com Guest

    At the PHT, I have thoroughly enjoyed the New York Bar & Grill, and Kozue. However, the location is not for me; I know they used to have a shuttle to Shinjuku station, at least before the pandemic.

    I also went up there once or twice for the views on the lobby level; I'd grab a slice of cake and a tea, and snap Nishi Shinjuku and Nakano.

  19. Lady London Guest

    Will reopen as a Category 10 Hotel

    1. TravelinWilly Diamond

      "But this one goes to eleven."

      Any and all references to Spinal Tap always win.

      Always.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

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Eskimo Guest

I hope PH doesn't get Lost in Renovation.

5
Chas Guest

Well, we all knew this was coming at some point sooner than later. I'm sure many reading this blog are (in my opinion, naively) celebrating the coming change, but for longtime fans of this hotel, I view it as a huge risk. The big question of course: will they screw it up? I'm hopeful, but not optimistic on that front. From a design standpoint, this is not an ideal time to renovate; extreme minimalist uniformity dominates current tastes, and it isn't clear to me this trend is either lasting or attractive. Even at the highest end of luxury, most new and newly-renovated properties don't seem to have the long term in mind, be it from design choices (favoring trendy over timeless) or fit/finish itself (nominally expensive but "cheap" feeling furnishings used in rooms, etc). We can probably take solace in the fact that at least this property is in Japan, where culture has not allowed trendy design fads to take as strong a hold as elsewhere, but even that seems to be changing. The fact that the PHT has stood for 30 years with barely any design changes, even minor ones, is a testament to everything the designers got right originally: timeless over trendiness and understated over flashy. And that's not to mention the quality of the materials; it's only been in the past few years that reviewers have started to seriously complain about wear and tear at this property. And most importantly I've yet to see anyone credibly fault the now 30-year-old interior design aside from physical wear itself; those that do seem mostly to express contrarian/critical views for the sake of it. I worry that choosing a big name design firm here means the designers will want to express their creativity and "leave their mark." Hopefully they will realize that the way to leave a lasting mark on this timeless treasure of the travel world is to color within the lines; fix what's broken, not what isn't.

3
Frank B Gold

But this one goes to eleven.

3
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