Brazil Adds E-Visa Requirement For Americans & Others

Brazil Adds E-Visa Requirement For Americans & Others

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Traveling to Brazil is about to become a bit more costly and complicated for Americans…

Brazil adds e-visa requirement for US citizens & others

As of April 10, 2024, Brazil is adding a new e-visa requirement for citizens of the United States, Canada, and Australia. Specifically, an e-visa will cost $80.90 per person, and will be valid for multiple entries. For those from the United States, it will be valid for 10 years, while for those from Canada or Australia, it will be valid for five years.

You can apply for an e-visa directly on this government website, and processing times for an e-visa will be up to five business days, though it’s recommended that you apply long before that if possible.

Application requirements for the e-visa include filling out an application form, submitting a passport-style photo, providing proof of roundtrip flights, and sharing printed bank statements showing transactions for the last 30 days, and showing at least $2,000 available for travel. I think that bank statement requirement will probably make some travelers pretty uncomfortable.

Unfortunately this is quite a step backwards for Brazil in terms of ease of travel. Just for some context:

  • Up until early 2018, it was complicated for Americans to get a visa for Brazil, as it required going to a consulate
  • Then in 2018, Brazil introduced the option of e-visas for eligible travelers
  • Then in 2019, Brazil completely eliminated visa requirements for Americans, in an effort to boost tourism

So now we’re going back to the 2018 policy, though fortunately we at least don’t have to go to consulates to get visas, as was the case prior to that.

Traveling to Brazil will become a bit more complicated

How Brazil justifies this new e-visa requirement

The Brazilian government is justifying this new visa requirement by explaining that it’s a reciprocal policy, and is being added because other countries have the same travel requirements for Brazilians. The government claims to be “negotiating visa exemption agreements with these three countries, based on principles of reciprocity and equality between states.”

It’s unlikely that the United States will lift the current requirement for Brazilians, and therefore I doubt we’ll see much change. A few thoughts:

  • I absolutely think the US largely has too much red tape when it comes to issuing tourist visas, so I by no means think the United States is right and Brazil is wrong
  • However, no matter how you slice it, needing to apply for an e-visa is a minor headache and adds further expenses to a trip, and has some impact on tourism demand
  • It seems pretty clear to me that this is simply a technique for the government to generate revenue, more than anything else

So I guess we’re still better off than we were up until early 2018, where you had to go to a consulate to get a visa. However, it’s unfortunate to see the country adding barriers to travel.

I’m not a fan of barriers to travel

Bottom line

As of April 2024, Brazil is adding a new e-visa requirement for citizens of the United States, Canada, and Australia. This is being justified on a reciprocal basis, and represents the reversal of a policy that was intended to promote tourism in the country.

Ultimately if you want to visit Brazil, it’s not that big of a hurdle to overcome. But I still find it frustrating how many countries (including the United States) require these kinds of e-visas, which just add cost and frustration for travelers.

What do you make of Brazil adding back a visa requirement for some foreigners?

Conversations (113)
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  1. Tammy Guest

    I wont be going to Brazil!! I just wanted to see the Eagles game with my Dad. And them needing a copy of my bank statement? and it showing at least 2000.00 dollars, WHY?? Hell NO!!! That is none of there business. Its childish of them to say they are doing it because we do? tit for tat..

  2. MetsNomad Guest

    A few years ago, I was invited by a friend to a week at his grandparents' villa in the south of France. As a U.S. Citizen, all I had to do was get on the plane and get there. My passport was stamped without a single word from the immigration officer in Nice.

    I'm from one of the 8 (I believe) countries in the Americas for which a visa is required to visit France....

    A few years ago, I was invited by a friend to a week at his grandparents' villa in the south of France. As a U.S. Citizen, all I had to do was get on the plane and get there. My passport was stamped without a single word from the immigration officer in Nice.

    I'm from one of the 8 (I believe) countries in the Americas for which a visa is required to visit France. For me to travel there with that country's passport, I would need:

    - For my friend's grandparents to go to the City Hall of the town where the property is and get a form called an "Attestation d'accueil. for which they need:
    1. Their passport or national identity card and a copy
    2. A letter from them with my name, nationality and passport number explaining their relationship to me, that they are indeed inviting me, why, for how long, and that they are willing and able to provide support should I not have enough money to fund my visit.
    3. A copy of the deed (if they own it) or the lease (if they're renting it) to the property.
    4. Copies of recent utility bills (electricity, gas, phone) of the property.
    5. A copy of their most recent tax forms and 3 most recent pay stubs.
    6. Copy of recent bank statement.
    7. A description of their property (size, square footage, how many rooms, bathrooms, etc.) to satisfy that there is enough room to accommodate a foreign guest comfortably (and, get this: the French government can actually send someone to your house to check for themselves!)
    8. Proof of having paid an administrative fee of 30 Euro for the form.

    For the visa, I'd then need:
    - A valid passport and copy of the data page
    - 2 photos
    - A round-trip airline ticket
    - The ORIGINAL Attestation d'accueil form (NO photocopies!).
    - Copies of my 3 most recent bank statements
    - Copies of recent pay stubs (I think they require 3)
    - Copies of last year's tax forms
    - A letter from my job, on company letterhead, explaining what my position is, what my salary is, how long I've been working at the company, that I have indeed been approved by them to take a vacation and for how long, AND that my job would be waiting for me when I return.
    - Proof of medical insurance lasting the period of my visit with a minimum coverage of 30000 Euro.
    - Fingerprints of all ten fingers
    - 80 Euro (or its equivalent in the local currency), which I would not get back should my visa not get approved.

    The differences are night and day! But a lot of people visit the U.S., Canada and Europe frequently despite all these hoops to jump through. I'm sure they'd take Brazil's easy e-visa process any day!

  3. Musicgrazer New Member

    Just FYI. This requirement initially went into place as of 1/1/24. We are doing a cruise that goes to Brazil so we slogged through their website -- no easy feat. Then a few days later they announced a delay to April 2024 It does take a while to get approval but you might want to wait until closer to 60 days prior to trip to submit in case they delay again. $80/person to apply.

  4. Joe Embrickson Guest

    Won’t be traveling to Brazil

  5. Comment Clown Guest

    Controversial, but this is stupid. Reciprocity is theoretically fair, but the US is the most powerful country and economy in the world. If you make it harder for Americans to empty their pockets in your country, they will go elsewhere. The US supported Lula during Brazil's tough transition of power and loudly stood behind Brazil's democratic principals. Don't ruin the start of a good relationship with petty games and capital restrictions.

    1. Ricardo Guest

      It is not reciprocity if Brazil charges less than half for a visa that is obtained easily online in a few days. Reciprocity would mean humiliating Americans like the US does with Brazilians. Which I don’t agree with, of course.
      Meanwhile, the US charges 185 dollars to renew a visa, making you wait almost two years (brazilians have to wait average of 20 months to get US visa) Also, you have to go in...

      It is not reciprocity if Brazil charges less than half for a visa that is obtained easily online in a few days. Reciprocity would mean humiliating Americans like the US does with Brazilians. Which I don’t agree with, of course.
      Meanwhile, the US charges 185 dollars to renew a visa, making you wait almost two years (brazilians have to wait average of 20 months to get US visa) Also, you have to go in person to an US Embassy or Consulate, in humiliating conditions, even if you had travelled to US (and back) twenty times in ten years.
      In a giant country like Brazil, a person from Manaus, for example, has to fly to Brasilia or Sao Paulo to get a visa, a trip that is usually more expensive than going to Miami.

  6. Charles Chan Massey Guest

    The bank statement requirement is bullshit (and for the record, I am a US citizen and I also think the US requirement to submit bank statements for visitors visas is bullshit). I don’t plan to visit Brazil any time soon because of this bullshit. It’s more invasive than “visa on arrival” schemes, which are pure money grabs.

  7. Wa Guest

    Won’t be going back, another retaliation action by Brazil… no thanks I will protest with my wallet

  8. YYZPhil Guest

    Cambodia requires an e-visa/visa on arrival from most countries, so until I found out I had Cambodian citizenship through birthright, I was annoyed having to hand cash over with my Canadian passport.

    That's until my now-wife tried to apply to visit Canada on a Cambodian passport. Cambodian citizens can only visit a couple of dozen countries without a visa (versus Canadians having about 80% of the world visa-free). She didn't get approved. I had to...

    Cambodia requires an e-visa/visa on arrival from most countries, so until I found out I had Cambodian citizenship through birthright, I was annoyed having to hand cash over with my Canadian passport.

    That's until my now-wife tried to apply to visit Canada on a Cambodian passport. Cambodian citizens can only visit a couple of dozen countries without a visa (versus Canadians having about 80% of the world visa-free). She didn't get approved. I had to *marry her* and she had to *move to Canada permanently with me* before she got to chance to even land!

    I had to speak to a friend who happened to be a Member of Parliament after the visa was refused, and some of the paperwork you needed to satisfy Canadian visa requirements? "List ALL your family members in your home country with birth dates and addresses and their relationship to you". What the... for a tourist visa...?

  9. Parnel Guest

    If USA just learned how to kick out people who overstayed, they would NOT need a visa requirement for Brazil.
    Time for USA to fix its own mess.

    1. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      That's the dumbest post I've seen on here in quite some time.

  10. A350-fan New Member

    Just to add my datapoint, for whatever it's worth. As I applied shortly before the then-implementation date, I'm sure there was probably a crush of applications slowing things down a bit.

    I applied for my visa on 12/18 and received it on 1/6. Definitely more than 5 business days, but not terrible, plus there's the whole end-of-year holidays in that duration too.

    As an American, the visa is valid for 10 years/multiple entries, and allows...

    Just to add my datapoint, for whatever it's worth. As I applied shortly before the then-implementation date, I'm sure there was probably a crush of applications slowing things down a bit.

    I applied for my visa on 12/18 and received it on 1/6. Definitely more than 5 business days, but not terrible, plus there's the whole end-of-year holidays in that duration too.

    As an American, the visa is valid for 10 years/multiple entries, and allows for 90 days in any 1 year period. I can't speak for Canada/Australia.

  11. Fulano Guest

    This is not a revenue issue. It's a resentment issue on the part of the Brazilian Foreign Ministry."Those Americans demand a visa? We'll do the same. Who cares if Brazil badly needs tourist dollars."

  12. Ken Guest

    This online application process has turned into a nightmare for EVERYONE as the system Brazil is using continually breaks down, locks up, and customer service is non-existent. So many people are going to lose their trip costs as the Jan. 10 deadline approaches.

  13. Bill Guest

    Upon arrival, Americans must go through an immigration line that is intentionally understaffed at airports. The government really dislikes Americans these days!

    1. VladG Gold

      There is a separate immigration line for Americans?

    2. Ricardo Guest

      Of course no. Bill is just stupid.

  14. Shannon Guest

    the result of left wing and pro-China & Russia Lula administration

  15. Ben Guest

    Whether people care about the actual financial impact to their country or whether they care about their own feeling of satisfaction with their country is a good predictor of their feelings on this policy.

  16. Grey Diamond

    Quite funny how all of the Americans on here are moaning and saying they won't visit Brazil, blah blah blah. US requires visas from Brazilians, so Brazil requires visa from Brazil. It is an e-visa. So easy. Don't need to go anywhere or make any actual effort. But Americans think they are just the chosen people and should be able to do whatever they want. Ugh.

    1. Bob Guest

      I have been traveling to Brazil for 50+ years after working there. Yes many Americans do think they are privileged, however, how many 9/11's happened in Brazil? Zero. Also, I have many Brazilian friends who came to the US to visit and overstayed their visas to live here. I don't blame them but there is a reason behind these extra requirements from our government.

    2. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      What on earth does 9/11 have to do with anything?

    3. Tammy Guest

      yes your right. And most people are just to blind to see that?? either over staying or just coming in illegally.

    4. Nun Guest

      That’s not why at all.

      Brazil has the highest number of visa overstays in the US, at least a couple years ago. Per capita they’re not the highest but still high. In contrast few Americans live illegally in Brazil.

      Brazil can do whatever they want. They’re defending their citizens in a way with a Brazil first policy, but it is definitely a reciprical visa.

  17. Me Guest

    Lucky,

    I still have a valid pre-2019 Visa for Brasil. Do I have to apply for a new visa or can I use the current one until it expires??

    1. Craig Guest

      My guess is that existing visas will still be good

    2. The nice Paul Guest

      I'm not confident that guessing about visa validity would be a good idea.

      Pre-9/11, I had a US visa with lifetime validity entitling me to unlimited multiple visits. Such visas were among the first to be abolished.

      Since it was Bush, I think, that subsequently claimed "Mission Accomplished", should I just assume that that visa is now valid again...?

  18. BenjaminGuttery Diamond

    I went to Brazil twice during the "open period" summer of 2019 and January of 2020. Had excellent trips in Minas Gerais, and Rio Grande du Su, and São Paulo. Was really looking forward to coming back and doing Rio de Janiero and other parts of the country. Now, that won't be happening. I'm not sharing my bank account information and transactions with ANY country. Not even my own. This is ridiculous and obviously an...

    I went to Brazil twice during the "open period" summer of 2019 and January of 2020. Had excellent trips in Minas Gerais, and Rio Grande du Su, and São Paulo. Was really looking forward to coming back and doing Rio de Janiero and other parts of the country. Now, that won't be happening. I'm not sharing my bank account information and transactions with ANY country. Not even my own. This is ridiculous and obviously an over reach. Lastly, for someone just planning on 1 trip, the cost of the visa is very prohibitive. $160 for a couple, $320 for a family of 4? That's insane. I hope the US actually ADDS to the "red tape" for these countries and regions making it difficult for us to go a SPEND money in the places and to do business there. Ridiculous.

    1. VladG Gold

      "$160 for a couple, $320 for a family of 4? That's insane."

      Now double that and you get the cost of a US visa for everyone who needs one.

  19. jetlaggedAF Guest

    I travel to Sao Paulo a couple of times a year on work so it could be interesting. The US makes it extremely hard for my Brazilian colleagues to get their visas so turnabout is fair play imo. One question I have is how would this work for dual nationals? I have a UK passport in addition to my US one. I believe the UK is exempt from this rule. Could I just enter Brazil on my UK passport or should I just go ahead and get the visa to be safe?

    1. bbertolli New Member

      Just enter with your UK one, no need for visa.

  20. STEFFL Gold

    It seems pretty clear to me that this is simply a technique for the government to generate revenue, more than anything else

    ...... they simply do, what the US does since ages to "generate revenue" (e.g. for Military reasons) and do it with NO REAL safety or sense making cause!
    It's bullshit, Visa's or stupid ESTA for some, to visit the US.
    Brazil has made it's homework, crazy thing is, they learned from...

    It seems pretty clear to me that this is simply a technique for the government to generate revenue, more than anything else

    ...... they simply do, what the US does since ages to "generate revenue" (e.g. for Military reasons) and do it with NO REAL safety or sense making cause!
    It's bullshit, Visa's or stupid ESTA for some, to visit the US.
    Brazil has made it's homework, crazy thing is, they learned from the worst! ;-)
    Int. incoming US tourism is at a low since 2019, travelling the US is not just crazy and dangerous, it is unnecessary expensive too. (Visa, ESTA, Resort fees, Nat. Park fees . . . country doesn't have much else interesting to offer, and if so, it ALL involves HIGH cost, unnecessary!)
    Therefore, if a US sex tourist to Brazil can't afford the Visa fee, stay home but DON'T think any US Traveller is any special, compared to others!
    Brazil needs Tourist money, that's it!
    . . . the US of A needs that money desperately since many years! NEVER could anybody from overseas enter the US, without paying crazy amounts to enter a country, that loves to shoot people all over!
    So think about the Brazil change from both sides. ;-)

    1. BenjaminGuttery Diamond

      LOL. So Brazil doesn't have crime issues, any resort fees, or expensive places to visit, AND all Americans visiting there must be "Sex Tourists". Okay, have fun continuing your fever dream....

    2. bbertolli New Member

      There is no resort fees in Brazil actually.

  21. Ivan Guest

    The the visa fee seems fair but on the bank statement requirement seems pretty silly especially for a ten year visa, I guess of I have 2k in my bank Brasil thinks I'm financially stable for the next decade.

    Sounds like a scheme cooked up by bureaucrats who have never stepped for in the private sector. My guess is the result will be incrementally less tourism which won't be offset by the increased fees....

    The the visa fee seems fair but on the bank statement requirement seems pretty silly especially for a ten year visa, I guess of I have 2k in my bank Brasil thinks I'm financially stable for the next decade.

    Sounds like a scheme cooked up by bureaucrats who have never stepped for in the private sector. My guess is the result will be incrementally less tourism which won't be offset by the increased fees.

    I would still like to visit Brasil but the change makes it less appealing.

  22. simmonad Guest

    I think you need to make up your mind here. Is it a reciprocity issue or a money-generating scheme? If the latter, then why would Brazil bother with negotiations for exemptions from e-visas?

  23. A. Wolf Guest

    Does the writer know why visas are required for Brazilians to visit the US? The number of Brazilians that come to the US and end up staying is very high, many do not go back to Brazil; the countries that have visa free entry to the US do not have a high percentage of their citizens remaining in the country, beyond their visa duration: they go back; there’s a percentage that the US uses and...

    Does the writer know why visas are required for Brazilians to visit the US? The number of Brazilians that come to the US and end up staying is very high, many do not go back to Brazil; the countries that have visa free entry to the US do not have a high percentage of their citizens remaining in the country, beyond their visa duration: they go back; there’s a percentage that the US uses and if it’s higher than that percentage, that country doesn’t get visa-free entry to the US. I know quite a few Brazilians that came to the US as tourists and never went back to Brazil. (two actually asked me to marry them, so that they could become legal residents, but I declined).
    The EU will be requiring US citizens to register online, pay a small fee, prior to traveling (the US already does this to EU citizens); it’s supposed to go into effect in 2025, barring any hiccups in implementation (it has already been postponed from this year to 2025.

    1. simmonad Guest

      I'm losing count of the number of times ETIAS has been postponed - at least 3, I think.

  24. MKLDH Gold

    Reading through the comment section, I find it almost hilarious that many people from the developed countries, even those seasoned travellers, can have so little idea about the amount of travel previledge they enjoy.

  25. William Guest

    The reciprocal approach. Quite logical. Getting a US visa is not all that easy.

    1. STEFFL Gold

      TRUE! 100%
      .... and VERY costly too! ;-)

  26. JetSetFly Guest

    It’s so obvious why EU and USA requires extensive visa process compares to countries like Brazil. I’m sure there are a lot more Brazilians overstay their US tourist visas than vice versa. Same can be said for most less developed countries around the world. I imagine US has more over stayed tourist in the world than any other country hence the difficulty of obtaining a tourist visa. Brazil is a beautiful country and have wonderful...

    It’s so obvious why EU and USA requires extensive visa process compares to countries like Brazil. I’m sure there are a lot more Brazilians overstay their US tourist visas than vice versa. Same can be said for most less developed countries around the world. I imagine US has more over stayed tourist in the world than any other country hence the difficulty of obtaining a tourist visa. Brazil is a beautiful country and have wonderful people. It’s definitely a place worth visiting. I’m glad I visited few years ago without having to jump through hoops. Rio is top three most beautiful large city I’ve ever seen. With that said, since I’ve checked Brazil off my list, I wouldn’t be returning any time soon and definitely not while I have to go through all these acrobats in order to get a visa.

    1. Grey Diamond

      No EU country requires a visa for Brazilians. Brazilians can visit most countries in the world without a visa. US is an outlier.

  27. JL Guest

    WTF USD $80.90 per person?
    If my family of 4 travels to Brazil, we need to pay more than 300 dollars for a Visa?
    That is insane...I don't think I have ever seen a visa cost this high.
    I was actually planning on visiting Brazil with my family early next year, but I don't want to anymore.

    1. Alan Diamond

      You must not travel much. US visas cost $185 and many other countries charge Americans the same amount as more (China and Russia as examples). 80.90 is actually cheap since Brazil is basing this upon reciprocity.

  28. Bitzer Guest

    As much as you think it’s a scheme for the government to make more money, it is not. The current Brazilian administration despises Americans, even tourists. It blames all its incompetence on the USA and Americans and does not want tourism from those countries.

    1. Wolff13 Gold

      I have visa-free entry to Brazil and have never had a desire to go there; one of my uncles lives there.

  29. John Lopez Guest

    It is not about revenue, this is politics, they are Going backwards and this is horrible for their economy. Brazilians can’t have a visa waiver to come to the U.S. because they can be immigrants, they can stay here, opposite to Americans that won’t go to Brazil to stay there to live.

  30. Kiwi Guest

    Sounds like they’re annoyed at the proliferation of Advances travel requirements “the visa that’s not a visa” eg. ESTA, eTA for Canada Australia and NZ and the upcoming one for Schengen area( assuming it doesn’t get delayed again) . Though Bank statements is far more excessive than those other countries

  31. Ryan Guest

    If we wanna get really petty and take a tit for tat approach then I guess this makes sense, but in general it’s just Brazil that’s going to lose with this policy. It will turn off potential tourists from visiting and spending money there. In general, it seems that many Latin American governments just love shooting themselves in the foot with these kinds of protectionist measures.

    US has a strict formula for determining which countries...

    If we wanna get really petty and take a tit for tat approach then I guess this makes sense, but in general it’s just Brazil that’s going to lose with this policy. It will turn off potential tourists from visiting and spending money there. In general, it seems that many Latin American governments just love shooting themselves in the foot with these kinds of protectionist measures.

    US has a strict formula for determining which countries are visa-free, and it looks at overstays and denial rates by country. Brazil will never get visa free access until they meet these criteria, which aren’t political.

    1. Antifa Guest

      If data-driven visa policy is the case of United States, then US should grant visa-free policy to the country like Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, etc which has very low visa denial and overstay rates, but they did not. Therefore it IS political as well, do not lie to ourself.

    2. Ryan Guest

      Brunei has visa-free access…

    3. Wolff13 Gold

      Very true; too many Brazilians overstay their visa and remain illegally in the US.

  32. derek Guest

    Indonesia is going the other way.
    https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/indonesia-eyes-visa-waivers-20-countries-including-us-china-india-2023-12-07/
    JAKARTA, Dec 7 (Reuters) - Indonesia is considering granting visa-free entry to nationals of 20 countries, including the United States, China, Australia, India, South Korea, Germany, Britain and France, to boost its tourism and economy, its tourism minister said on Thursday.

    The government will finalise the list of countries included in the provision within one month, according to a statement.

    Minister Sandiaga Uno said the president...

    Indonesia is going the other way.
    https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/indonesia-eyes-visa-waivers-20-countries-including-us-china-india-2023-12-07/
    JAKARTA, Dec 7 (Reuters) - Indonesia is considering granting visa-free entry to nationals of 20 countries, including the United States, China, Australia, India, South Korea, Germany, Britain and France, to boost its tourism and economy, its tourism minister said on Thursday.

    The government will finalise the list of countries included in the provision within one month, according to a statement.

    Minister Sandiaga Uno said the president had instructed the government to consider the visa waiver as a means of boosting the economy, tourism visits and investment.

  33. Hank Tarn Guest

    The cheek of these countries that hate us.
    We need to build the wall.

    1. Tank Harn Guest

      YES, EXACTLY!! And ideally put your loved ones outside of it.

  34. Ken Guest

    LOLOLOLOL I get that this blog caters mostly to Americans, but people whining about sending their bank statements have never applied for a US tourist visa. They ask for many things including bank statements and social media handles. The US is not the only country to do that. As someone mentioned below, Schengen requires similar documents. Granted I have a Nigerian passport though have lived in developed countries for over 20 years, each time I...

    LOLOLOLOL I get that this blog caters mostly to Americans, but people whining about sending their bank statements have never applied for a US tourist visa. They ask for many things including bank statements and social media handles. The US is not the only country to do that. As someone mentioned below, Schengen requires similar documents. Granted I have a Nigerian passport though have lived in developed countries for over 20 years, each time I apply for US, Schengen, Canada and many visas...even Thai visas, they ask for Bank statements

  35. Julia Guest

    "But I still find it frustrating how many countries (including the United States) require these kinds of e-visas"

    The US still requires more than an e-visa for most...and you better be prepared to bring all your bank and financial statements if you plan to be approved for a visa to the US.

    I find it interesting how Americans find the occasional e-visa thrown at them to be so exhausting, when many around the world have to do so much just to get a visa to the US.

    1. XPL Diamond

      Yes. This. I am a U.S. citizen but my wife and stepdaughter are not. The visa application and renewal process are not deliberately designed to be time consuming, costly, and denigrating, but that certainly is the result and the impression given. Call it reciprocity, or call it chickens coming home to roost, but don't call Brazil's actions unfair.

    2. George Romey Guest

      But to be fair there are far, far more South Americans that want to come to the US permanently without going through proper channels than US Citizens that want to do the same going to South America. Also, the US doesn't have exit customs. So if someone overstays their Visa that's not going to be detected upon departing the US-and returning.

      So it only makes sense that the US would want to have some assurance...

      But to be fair there are far, far more South Americans that want to come to the US permanently without going through proper channels than US Citizens that want to do the same going to South America. Also, the US doesn't have exit customs. So if someone overstays their Visa that's not going to be detected upon departing the US-and returning.

      So it only makes sense that the US would want to have some assurance someone traveling on a tourist visa to the US would want to/need to return to Brazil.

    3. Nik Guest

      Lol, you are so wrong in your assumptions and your logic.

      We are talking about people coming to the US through legal channels. That is applying for a visa. The amount of paperwork they require to show that you have substantial ties to your home country is mind blowing. Basically people carry folders of financial documents (bank statements, tax statements, incorporation of businesses) to just prove that they have no intentions of overstaying their visa...

      Lol, you are so wrong in your assumptions and your logic.

      We are talking about people coming to the US through legal channels. That is applying for a visa. The amount of paperwork they require to show that you have substantial ties to your home country is mind blowing. Basically people carry folders of financial documents (bank statements, tax statements, incorporation of businesses) to just prove that they have no intentions of overstaying their visa in the US once granted.

      Also for your customs part, every time you enter or depart the US, there is an I94 issued to you electronically based on either the entry customs or the airline systems (on departure from the country). Your each date of entry and exit from the US is available on the DHS website. So, if you overstayed, its very well reflected in the DHS system and available to visa issuing authorities.

      Atleast other countries are sensible enough to make this an online process. The US doesnt want to even invest in that.

  36. Hugo Guest

    Ben, you are wrong. Brazil has a long tradition of reciprocity. And so they should. I still remember an AA pilot making obscene gestures when getting his photo and fingerprints taken upon arrival in São Paulo back in 2004. Same stuff back then, Brazil started imposing to Americans the same treatment imposed to Brazilians whenever they went to the USA. Pilot and crew didn't like it. He went to jail and was fined and then...

    Ben, you are wrong. Brazil has a long tradition of reciprocity. And so they should. I still remember an AA pilot making obscene gestures when getting his photo and fingerprints taken upon arrival in São Paulo back in 2004. Same stuff back then, Brazil started imposing to Americans the same treatment imposed to Brazilians whenever they went to the USA. Pilot and crew didn't like it. He went to jail and was fined and then was AA was fined as well. Not sure why the tendency is always to think that when others take similar measures against the USA it is always about making money. It is not. It is called foreign policy.

    1. Alan Diamond

      I actually remember Brazil taking ink fingerprints and then simply throwing away the forms but it was fun seeing Americans having to get their hands dirty!

  37. BB Guest

    Brazil's government has long had this reciprocal policy regarding visas. I don't see as a way of generating extra revenue and more as a political issue. Brazil had waived visas before as a goodwill gesture towards these countries, when they didn't waive for Brazilians, the government suspended it. Japan is an example where they waived for the visa Brazilian nationals and therefore they are not part of this new visa requirement.

    1. Wolff13 Gold

      Brazilians are the number one overstayers of their visa to the US. (State department statistics).

    2. bbertolli New Member

      That was not the point. Point was since USA didn't waive, Brazil won't as well.

  38. derek Guest

    If I were a country, I would also have visa and/or e-visa requirements for some countries based on security risks, economic risks, rate of compliance by travelers, etc.

    If I were Brazil, I would try to seek relief for Brazilians but also try not to require visas for short stays for tourism from the US and EU. Maybe as an incentive for the US to change and a bargaining chip, a visa on arrival...

    If I were a country, I would also have visa and/or e-visa requirements for some countries based on security risks, economic risks, rate of compliance by travelers, etc.

    If I were Brazil, I would try to seek relief for Brazilians but also try not to require visas for short stays for tourism from the US and EU. Maybe as an incentive for the US to change and a bargaining chip, a visa on arrival that has a fee is the way to go?

    The US Visa Waiver Program has a criteria regarding the rate of overstays. Chile belongs to the program. Argentina was kicked out. Brazil does not qualify.

  39. George Romey Guest

    This is far worse than pre 2018/2019. Getting a Visa used to be pretty simple. If I remember (it's been nearly 15 years) I just went to the Brazilian embassy in NYC with a passport photo, my passport and the fee in cash and walked out 30 minutes later with the Visa in my Passport. Sending bank statements? Who even keeps paper statements around? Needing $2K in your bank account? Lots of young people aren't going to be going down for Carnival.

    1. Never In Doubt Guest

      That 2018 process isn't nearly so "simple" for people who don't live within easy access of a Brazilian consulate.

  40. 305 Guest

    Are EU passports still allowed in without a visa? Makes it a heck of a lot easier for dual citizens like you and I

    1. Hugo Guest

      EU passports are not targeted with these.

    2. Julia Guest

      Doesn't look like it, which provides a loophole for us dual citizens. I have an Italian and Canadian passport so it looks like if I use my Italian passport I can get around the visa.

    3. Julia Guest

      Sorry, allow me to clarify my previous post. My first sentence is unclear. I was responding to Hugo and your comment at the same time. I was checking for Italy and Italian passports are exempt.

  41. Brian Guest

    Hey Ben, just a heads up that the government website to which you link is not actually a government website. That's a private service.

  42. David Guest

    There are lots of airline employees (active and retired) who have the ability to travel at reduced fares but only on a stanby basis (i.e. no confirmed reservations). How will eVisa work for airline employees who would like to travel to Brazil, but not able to travel with a confirmed reservation(s)?

    1. Jordan Diamond

      Ummm, it will work exactly the same as other countries requiring evisa. You add the flight you are LISTED on.

  43. Jim Guest

    I have an airside transit in GRU in March, and it's been maddening trying to figure out whether I need to do anything for that...

    1. Canuck70 Guest

      You should be ok without an e-visa if you're transiting Int'l to Int'l through GRU. I've done this a number of times in recent years and have just been directed to a small security screening station for transiting passengers beside the immigration checkpoint. After you go through that you're directed back into the Int'l departures area. There was no need to go through immigration.

  44. Nik Guest

    Lol, I see alot of people complaining about having to send bank statements. The US itself does require sending in bank statements for tourism visas and a schengen visa also requires bank statements for the last three months. The joke is that to get a visitor visa to the US, the wait time right now is almost a year (getting better though). When the US and Europe don't make it easy for anybody why do...

    Lol, I see alot of people complaining about having to send bank statements. The US itself does require sending in bank statements for tourism visas and a schengen visa also requires bank statements for the last three months. The joke is that to get a visitor visa to the US, the wait time right now is almost a year (getting better though). When the US and Europe don't make it easy for anybody why do you expect reciprocity. The Schengen visa is also so ridiculous that they don't issue multi-year visas unless you establish a number of visits to Europe in a given period of time. So every time you need to visit you have to pay $90 for each family member plus the time and effort involved to get one.

    I think people should overcome their previlidge and start looking within for answers.

    1. Thomas Guest

      Last time i got a B2 no bank statement was required. Good thing, i was quite broke back then

    2. Pete Guest

      I don't know which country you're from, Nik, but as an Australian who travels on an Australian passport I haven't needed a tourist visa for the United States or Europe for many, many years. I've also visited a number of countries which require paper tourist visas and I've never been asked for bank statements, not even when visiting China.

      Furnishing financial information is fair enough for those applying for residency or citizenship, but for a...

      I don't know which country you're from, Nik, but as an Australian who travels on an Australian passport I haven't needed a tourist visa for the United States or Europe for many, many years. I've also visited a number of countries which require paper tourist visas and I've never been asked for bank statements, not even when visiting China.

      Furnishing financial information is fair enough for those applying for residency or citizenship, but for a tourist visa? No way. It's too much trouble, and I'll spend my privileged money elsewhere.

    3. XPL Diamond

      My wife and stepdaughter were required to present themselves physically to the U.S. Embassy and present... well, the embassy refused to say what they needed to bring. "Stuff". As a former U.S. diplomat who (briefly) worked the NIV line, I had them bring notarized letters from their bank attesting to the current and average past bank balances, and a whole lot more. Even then my stepdaughter was rejected for unstated reasons and I had to...

      My wife and stepdaughter were required to present themselves physically to the U.S. Embassy and present... well, the embassy refused to say what they needed to bring. "Stuff". As a former U.S. diplomat who (briefly) worked the NIV line, I had them bring notarized letters from their bank attesting to the current and average past bank balances, and a whole lot more. Even then my stepdaughter was rejected for unstated reasons and I had to recur to an insider to get her reconsidered. I did have to pay the US$160 application fee a second time though.

      And Americans are complaining that an online process is too onerous?

    4. Nik Guest

      Pete, congrats you are in the 30% that don’t require a visa but the rest of the world requires a visa for the US and as XPL mentioned that the US embassy never mentions it explicitly but the underlying principal is that you have to prove substantial ties to your country to not be at risk of illegally overstaying in the US. The most common interpretation of that is that you have to show quite...

      Pete, congrats you are in the 30% that don’t require a visa but the rest of the world requires a visa for the US and as XPL mentioned that the US embassy never mentions it explicitly but the underlying principal is that you have to prove substantial ties to your country to not be at risk of illegally overstaying in the US. The most common interpretation of that is that you have to show quite a bit of financial well being to not decide to illegally over stay in the US and thus your visa officer can ask you to furnish that information.

      The schengen visa - bank statements are required to show the ability to have a certain number of funds to cover for each day of your stated stay and to establish the fact that you didn't have one of your friends just temporarily transfer you that amount the day before for this very purpose.

    5. Alan Diamond

      The US has never required bank statements but rather it is up to the interviewing officer's discretion. I was the chief of the visa section at a consulate in Mexico and I always recommended the officers never ask for paperwork. In fact, during an interview with the local press a journalist asked me if the Consulate required paperwork and I replied that given that it was very simple to obtain fraudulent documents in Mexico, that...

      The US has never required bank statements but rather it is up to the interviewing officer's discretion. I was the chief of the visa section at a consulate in Mexico and I always recommended the officers never ask for paperwork. In fact, during an interview with the local press a journalist asked me if the Consulate required paperwork and I replied that given that it was very simple to obtain fraudulent documents in Mexico, that we could ask for every applicant's death certificate and every applicant would subsequently show up with one.

    6. Bob Guest

      > The US has never required bank statements
      Proceeds to tell about his experience in one exact county, which actually borders with US...

      For your info, there are many differences between the consulate requirements depending on the country you stay in. I lived in one of the eastern EU countries and had to provide a lot of papers in the consulate of a certain country to get a visa for. After moving to Switzerland...

      > The US has never required bank statements
      Proceeds to tell about his experience in one exact county, which actually borders with US...

      For your info, there are many differences between the consulate requirements depending on the country you stay in. I lived in one of the eastern EU countries and had to provide a lot of papers in the consulate of a certain country to get a visa for. After moving to Switzerland suddenly half of the requirements vanished even though my citizenship hasn't changed.
      So there is a certain difference between countries of origin and yes, US asks for bank statements in EU.

    7. XPL Diamond

      > The US has never required bank statements...

      I was a junior officer briefly assigned to the NIV line in AmEmb Tegucigalpa and I was instructed to reject outright any applicant who did not bring banking documentation, e.g. a savings passbook, letter from the bank with the average historical balance, etc. That's not to challenge your statement that Foggy Bottom has never required bank statements, but individual consulates certainly have and do require them.

      I...

      > The US has never required bank statements...

      I was a junior officer briefly assigned to the NIV line in AmEmb Tegucigalpa and I was instructed to reject outright any applicant who did not bring banking documentation, e.g. a savings passbook, letter from the bank with the average historical balance, etc. That's not to challenge your statement that Foggy Bottom has never required bank statements, but individual consulates certainly have and do require them.

      I agree with your opinion of the pointlessness of requiring particular documents, by the way. Quite a few consular officers disagree with us, however.

    8. Antwerp Guest

      @Nik It’s quite simple, millions of Brazilians would love to enter and stay in the U.S or EU. How many Americans or Europeans are clamoring to illegally live in Brazil? It’s going to have devastating effects on tourism and business there. I have a friend who owns a kiteboarding lodge in the NE of Brazil and he is already seeing future bookings fall off compared to a year ago. Brazil should pick its fights better. This is not one that will end well for them.

    9. Pete Guest

      Brazilians can enter EU without a visa. Brazil does not depend on tourism, and moreover the majority of the origin of the visitors to Brazil are from South America and Europe.

  45. spastores2 New Member

    I'm a dual citizen, flying in from LAX...I assume if I bring my EU passport they'll let me in no questions asked? Trying to avoid the bank statement requirement more than anything.

    1. Kyle Guest

      If you enter on a passport that does not require a visa, you do not require a visa. Log your EU passport information with the airline to show the airline you do not require a visa to enter.

  46. Lukas Diamond

    Reason #23 why I love having a dual citizenship :)

  47. TravelCat2 Gold

    I've received visas/evisas from China, Russia, India, Egypt, Turkey, Argentina, etc. That process involved various travel-related questions plus paying $s. Never had, and never will, provide a bank statement.

  48. BC Guest

    Less barriers to entry is always better. It's not about government revenue as I'm sure many tourists will add more than $90 in VAT (at 17%) and hotel taxes per visit, but about reciprocity.

    Nothing more than that. The USA decided the risks of visa free access outweigh the benefits. We make it tough for them.

    I agree it'll cost them more in the end but it's what their politicians want.

  49. AlanT98 Guest

    I`m surprised that México is not included in that list, considering that México added visa requirement recently to Brazilian citizens even tho Mexican citizens can still travel visa free to Brazil

    1. Never In Doubt Guest

      This is pretty clearly a negotiating move vs those three countries trying to get them to change their reciprocal requirements, not a money grab as Ben guesses. If it was a money grab, they’d include lots more countries.

      Why not Mexico too? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    2. Pete Guest

      You have the answer here: https://www.gov.br/mre/en/contact-us/press-area/press-releases/reciprocal-adoption-of-e-visas-by-brazil-and-mexico-2013-brazil-mexico-joint-statement

  50. Never In Doubt Guest

    Very glad we went to Brazil a year ago!

    We went to Iguaçu Falls, which was excellent. But if this visa hassle had been in place then, we’d probably have just stayed on the Argentine side.

  51. HGA Guest

    I have a valid 10 year tourist visa for Brazil issued in 2016. I hope it still works!

  52. Beachfan Guest

    Ben, what do you think about Gary’s kidnapping concern if you have a large balance in your bank statement?

    1. anon Guest

      Most people with larger net worths will have multiple bank accounts, use a clean one with minimal balance

    2. BB Guest

      Kidnapping is not a big issue in Brazil. Also, the bank statement does not become public, since its sensitive data, it is only viewed by federal police.

    3. Beachfan Guest

      It certainly is, more we capita than Mexico and #1 in the world. See view from the ring.

    4. Beachfan Guest

      It certainly is, more we capita than Mexico and #1 in the world. See view from the wing.

      Federal police are known to be corrupt.

    5. bbertolli New Member

      corrupt, really? Where did you get that info?

  53. Jeff Guest

    I presume the old 10-year visas (obtained prior to 2018) are still good? I have one issued in 2017.

  54. Patrick Guest

    The US does not make it easy to visit for the citizens of many countries. Right or wrong, that’s likely going to be the status quo for a while. It is more likely that people visiting the US will overstay their visas than Americans visiting Brazil. It is a blatant money grab, as is done in Chile and Argentina. Even the fees are “reciprocal.” It’s not a great way to grow tourism, but people continue...

    The US does not make it easy to visit for the citizens of many countries. Right or wrong, that’s likely going to be the status quo for a while. It is more likely that people visiting the US will overstay their visas than Americans visiting Brazil. It is a blatant money grab, as is done in Chile and Argentina. Even the fees are “reciprocal.” It’s not a great way to grow tourism, but people continue to pay and the governments can spend money from foreigners without taxing its own citizens.

  55. KS Guest

    As Gary noted on his blog, the biggest issue is the Printed bank statement showing transactions for the last 30 days and showing at least US$ 2,000.00 for travel requirement.

    I don’t see myself sending that information and thus, visiting Brazil in the future.

    1. AGrumpyOldMan_GA Diamond

      My thinking exactly. The e-visa is a minor annoyance, the bank statements are the problem. I don't intend to turn over my bank statements to the US government unless compelled to by an IRS agent. I sure don't intend to turn it over to a foreign government which could even higher levels of corruption the the U.S. I do have a side savings account for automotive purposes that currently has more than $2,000 so I...

      My thinking exactly. The e-visa is a minor annoyance, the bank statements are the problem. I don't intend to turn over my bank statements to the US government unless compelled to by an IRS agent. I sure don't intend to turn it over to a foreign government which could even higher levels of corruption the the U.S. I do have a side savings account for automotive purposes that currently has more than $2,000 so I guess I could send that. But, in general, there are nearly 200 countries I can visit, and Brazil just dropped way down the list.

  56. Russ Member

    But what's up with the bank statement and transaction history for 30 days?

    1. RetiredATLATC Diamond

      Yup, that's a non-starter. There are plenty of other countries to visit that don't require that nonsense.

    2. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      Yeah, that wasn't a thing even in 2015 when I last got my visa.

      I'd give them my secondary credit union account, that I only really use (sparsely) for travel-related transactions.

      But if they want more than that, they can sod off.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

The comments on this page have not been provided, reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any advertiser, and it is not an advertiser's responsibility to ensure posts and/or questions are answered.

Nik Guest

Lol, I see alot of people complaining about having to send bank statements. The US itself does require sending in bank statements for tourism visas and a schengen visa also requires bank statements for the last three months. The joke is that to get a visitor visa to the US, the wait time right now is almost a year (getting better though). When the US and Europe don't make it easy for anybody why do you expect reciprocity. The Schengen visa is also so ridiculous that they don't issue multi-year visas unless you establish a number of visits to Europe in a given period of time. So every time you need to visit you have to pay $90 for each family member plus the time and effort involved to get one. I think people should overcome their previlidge and start looking within for answers.

6
Grey Diamond

Quite funny how all of the Americans on here are moaning and saying they won't visit Brazil, blah blah blah. US requires visas from Brazilians, so Brazil requires visa from Brazil. It is an e-visa. So easy. Don't need to go anywhere or make any actual effort. But Americans think they are just the chosen people and should be able to do whatever they want. Ugh.

5
MKLDH Gold

Reading through the comment section, I find it almost hilarious that many people from the developed countries, even those seasoned travellers, can have so little idea about the amount of travel previledge they enjoy.

5
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