Reclining Your Airplane Seat: Right Or Privilege?

Reclining Your Airplane Seat: Right Or Privilege?

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It kind of amazes me how often we see viral stories about arguments that arise over seat recline on airplanes. Perhaps the reason this always goes so viral is because of how polarizing this topic is. Don’t get me wrong, I have my opinions, but fundamentally my belief is simply “let’s all be considerate to one another and minimize confrontations.” That belief doesn’t seem to be shared by many people.

As airlines increasingly squeeze more seats into planes, these situations will likely only continue to get worse. In this post I wanted to share my in-depth take on seat recline, and also address some of the arguments that I frequently see made. I’m then curious to hear what OMAAT readers have to say.

Reclining your seat is a right

For me it’s quite simple. Reclining your seat, when the functionality is available, is a right. After all, the recline button is located at your seat, and not the seat behind you.

There seems to be a common misconception about legroom being reduced when the person in front of you reclines:

  • Only the upper part of the seat generally moves, and not the lower part
  • If you recline your seat as well, then you’ll still have the same space between you and the seat in front

Again, none of this is to suggest that everyone should recline, but I do firmly believe that the right to recline belongs to the person with the button.

Reclining your airplane seat is a right

You should still be courteous

While you have the right to recline, that doesn’t mean that you actually should. If you’re going to recline your seat, you should be courteous with how you go about it. If the person seated behind you kindly asks you not to recline your seat (and has good reason for it), you should do the right thing, in my opinion.

For example, personally if I’m traveling in economy I don’t recline my seat at all (in fairness, I’m fortunate to generally not fly long hauls or redeyes in economy). Space is limited enough, and I am happy just sitting upright.

How to go about reclining your airplane seat

If you are going to recline your seat, I think there are a couple of things that you should do:

  • You should make eye contact with the person behind you, or somehow make them aware that you are reclining
  • You should slowly recline your seat, so that they have time to shift a laptop or whatever else they might have on their tray
Be considerate about how you recline your seat

What if the person in front of you reclines?

My stance on being reclined on from the seat in front of me is as follows:

  • If you’re reclined on and it’s absolutely unbearable, kindly ask the passenger in front of you if they wouldn’t mind keeping the seat upright; remember that you’re asking them a favor, and that you’re not entitled to that, so phrase the question accordingly
  • If they have an issue with it and it really is unbearable, kindly explain the issue to a flight attendant and see if they can reseat you or somehow intervene
  • If you know in advance that economy will be extremely uncomfortable (for example, if you’re really tall), pay extra for a seat with more legroom — almost all airlines will sell you extra legroom seats for a premium, and that can be worth it to avoid misery
  • If you really have an issue with seat recline, fly an airline that doesn’t allow you to recline seats, like Spirit (then again, airlines with non-reclining seats typically also have among the least seat pitch)

Avoid confrontation at all costs

This should go without saying, but given how many viral stories we see about seat recline, I guess it needs to be said. At 35,000 feet and in a post-9/11 world, you should never:

  • Do anything that would provoke another passenger to take physical or verbal action against you
  • Approach another passenger in an angry way in order to “take matters into your own hands”
  • Do something passive aggressive

I’m not opposed to non-reclining seats

While I do think reclining your seat is a right when the functionality is available, I’m not opposed to the trend we’ve seen among some airlines to introduce non-reclining seats. If airlines are going to keep seats as tight as they’ve become, I think it’s not a bad idea.

The thing about seat recline is that it’s a useful feature when everyone is on the same page. For example, on a redeye I think just about everyone is happy to have a reclining seat, since most people want to sleep. If everyone reclines, everyone is better off.

The issue arises from flights where people aren’t on the same page — for example, where one person wants to sleep, and the person behind them wants to work on their laptop.

Delta is a customer centered airline, and in 2019 the airline reduced seat recline on A320s without completely eliminating it, and it’s not a bad choice, in my opinion.

Arguments that I don’t agree with

When the topic of seat recline comes up, I see people making some arguments that I don’t personally agree with, and I want to share why. Again, to me this all comes down to just trying to be a reasonable human being who is looking to minimize confrontation.

“Airlines are at fault for making seats tighter”

There’s no denying that airlines are making seats tighter, and consumers don’t like it. At the same time, the introduction of these dense planes (look at the business models of Frontier and Spirit, for example) has allowed airfare to be at among the lowest we’ve seen in history (adjusted for inflation).

This makes travel more accessible for all, and I’d argue on balance that’s a good thing. For the most part airlines give passengers opportunities to purchase seats with extra legroom, so if you want to look at it differently, you’re still usually coming out ahead buying a seat with extra legroom compared to what airfare used to be in the “good old days.”

The trend toward less legroom has lead to lower fares

“Tall people should just buy first class”

To counter the point that airlines are at fault, some people say that tall people should just buy first class. Obviously that’s not always possible financially.

I do think there’s an important distinction to make here, though:

  • People who will be physically uncomfortable in economy as a result of reclining seats should try to do what they reasonably can to avoid those seats (whether that’s booking an airline with non-reclining seats, or paying for an extra legroom seat)
  • Sometimes that’s simply not possible, and in those situations we can still be compassionate and considerate to those people who are really uncomfortable, rather than doing things to spite them

“Just point the air nozzle at the person reclining”

Some people suggest that if the person in front of you reclines, take your air nozzle and point it right at the head of the person in front. There are several other similar suggestions I’ve seen people make, and all of them come down to people being jerks.

It shocks me that people see this as an appropriate response:

  • Generally speaking, people aren’t reclining their seat with malicious intent
  • If you point your air nozzle at someone else, that’s malicious and passive aggressive

This will all go downhill pretty quickly. You’ll “accidentally” point your air nozzle at another passenger, and then that person will “accidentally” spill hot coffee on you.

Can’t we all try to just be courteous to one another, express concerns with words rather than passive aggressiveness, and try to make situations better rather than worse?

Bottom line

Personally I think seat recline is a right and not a privilege, but I actually don’t think it matters (and this is my key takeaway from all of this). There are people who have very good logic for believing it’s a right, and there are people who have very good logic for believing it’s a privilege.

Short of airlines creating “pro-recline” and “anti-recline” sections of the plane, we are just best off being considerate towards one another.

A vast majority of people aren’t boarding a flight looking for a fight, but rather they’re just trying to get between two points as comfortably and punctually as possible.

If you are going to recline your seat, do so slowly, and make sure the person behind you knows. If you’re being reclined on and it’s unbearable, politely ask the person if they wouldn’t mind putting their seat back up.

No matter what, don’t be a jerk. If you can’t come to a reasonable agreement with the other person involved, immediately ask a flight attendant for help, and don’t try to take matters into your own hands.

Where do you stand on seat recline etiquette?

Conversations (110)
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  1. Layla Guest

    After spinal fusion surgery with complications it is medically necessary for me to avoid 90 degree seating. I buy a MCE seat. I ensure that the seat behind me is also MCE. Thus we both have same recline. I check before reclining. I’ve had to grab a drink or device when someone reclines abruptly. Fast reclines without notice is rude. First time fliers don’t know this. Keeping an eye out is advisable if your tray...

    After spinal fusion surgery with complications it is medically necessary for me to avoid 90 degree seating. I buy a MCE seat. I ensure that the seat behind me is also MCE. Thus we both have same recline. I check before reclining. I’ve had to grab a drink or device when someone reclines abruptly. Fast reclines without notice is rude. First time fliers don’t know this. Keeping an eye out is advisable if your tray contents sit on an unreclaimed seat in front of you.
    In shorter flights I lean forward during most of the flight. I don’t fight.

  2. Jb Guest

    Delta is the worst.... just flew from atl to Amsterdam in economy. I would not wish that on my worst enemy

  3. Jb Guest

    Seat defender works best

  4. Palaniappan Rajaram Guest

    Agree with everything that's said by the author, except the "airline is at fault" bit. Airlines ARE at fault and asking people to accommodate and be considerate with each other basically lets airline off the hook. This is similar to tipping: problem is one that is created by the establishment i.e., the owner/employer, yet the waitstaff and the customer are the ones fighting with each other. Passengers should take their fight with each other, to...

    Agree with everything that's said by the author, except the "airline is at fault" bit. Airlines ARE at fault and asking people to accommodate and be considerate with each other basically lets airline off the hook. This is similar to tipping: problem is one that is created by the establishment i.e., the owner/employer, yet the waitstaff and the customer are the ones fighting with each other. Passengers should take their fight with each other, to the airline and have the industry and the regulator fix the problem. Every flight should have a showdown between 2 passengers over seat reclining that results in a delay and a headache to the airline. Nothing will get their and the regulator's attention faster.

    I also disagree with the author that in a red eye flight people dont reclining cuz everyone will be doing it but not in a day flight. Well, aircraft is NOT an extension of one's office that a person's need to work on their laptop should be given any consideration at all when it comes to seat reclining. Aircraft is for travel and if possible, comfortably so. Being able to work is really a privilege...if you are able to work, great. If the person in the front reclines and that prevents you from working, so be it.

  5. Steve-YYZ Guest

    At 6'6" (2.01 meters) tall, the person in front of me cannot physically recline their seat without crushing my legs. Even if their seat is NOT reclined, I cannot use the seatback tray/table as it won't come down over my legs. Sure you can say just buy a more expensive seat and my answer to that is this... If fat people have to be legally accommodated by airlines at no additional cost due to their...

    At 6'6" (2.01 meters) tall, the person in front of me cannot physically recline their seat without crushing my legs. Even if their seat is NOT reclined, I cannot use the seatback tray/table as it won't come down over my legs. Sure you can say just buy a more expensive seat and my answer to that is this... If fat people have to be legally accommodated by airlines at no additional cost due to their size, why is girth considered a disability but my length is not? It's never come to a head with an uncooperative passenger in front of me yet, but when/if it does I'm prepared to file Human Rights discrimination charges against the airline and see where that goes.

  6. Miche norman Guest

    I pay for a set which is advertised as having a certain amount of legroom and surprisingly my legs are attached to my hips! If I am lucky I have about a quarter of an inch of free space between my knee and the seat in front. So if a selfish person sitting in front of me puts their sit back my seat goes from being uncomfortable to agony as their weight rests on my...

    I pay for a set which is advertised as having a certain amount of legroom and surprisingly my legs are attached to my hips! If I am lucky I have about a quarter of an inch of free space between my knee and the seat in front. So if a selfish person sitting in front of me puts their sit back my seat goes from being uncomfortable to agony as their weight rests on my knees. If the person is really tedious and insists it means spending the flight pushing against their seat to stop them invading my leg room. The real culprit is the airlines selling the same space twice. My advice take a book to stop people being selfish and use it to jam the seat in front

  7. Mark Guest

    Only recline if no one is behind you. It is not a right. It is an option.

    1. Palaniappan Rajaram Guest

      It is an option for which you have paid money and thus it becomes your right to use it as you see fit.

  8. Winnie the Poohtin Guest

    Packing more and more people into ever shrinking leg space, hoping that they will work it out 'amongst themselves' is always an overoptimistic and unrealistic worldview.
    Contentious as the issue is, so long as the recline button is there, the verdict is quite simple. You have a right to recline but no right to not be reclined on. It is like free speech. You have the right to it but no right to not...

    Packing more and more people into ever shrinking leg space, hoping that they will work it out 'amongst themselves' is always an overoptimistic and unrealistic worldview.
    Contentious as the issue is, so long as the recline button is there, the verdict is quite simple. You have a right to recline but no right to not be reclined on. It is like free speech. You have the right to it but no right to not be offended.
    If your special circumstances really call for extra space pay extra or drive to your destination or whatever. One alternative is, you can also reach a deal with the passenger in front of you, by offering plain hard cash to buy off his right to decline. Anyone who flies economy (that includes me) will forego his right given enough cash. I will happily do it for £15 for each hour of the flight, paid upfront. (I would not trust a stranger to pay me after the flight, so unless paid in cash upfront, we don't have a deal.) But yes, any such request to not incline should be approached as a deal rather than mere courtesy.

  9. Oswaldo Cuevas Guest

    Wow!!! This is the BEST post I have read from you in the many years I have enjoying OMAAT. You addressed this issue with the courtesy we need the most these days. Thanks Lucky for helping to educate travelers. Your opinions are very much appreciated :)

  10. Nunya Guest

    The only time I've ever had an issue was when the woman in front of me just slammed her seat back into my knees, then raised up and glared at me and said " Do you mind? ". I just told her " Not at all, but I don't have adjustable legs, but if I did I would just put them under the seat for you. " So she slammed the seat into my knees...

    The only time I've ever had an issue was when the woman in front of me just slammed her seat back into my knees, then raised up and glared at me and said " Do you mind? ". I just told her " Not at all, but I don't have adjustable legs, but if I did I would just put them under the seat for you. " So she slammed the seat into my knees again and when she realized that she was in more discomfort than I was, she un-reclined a bit. It was a short flight anyway and she survived.

  11. Dimitri Guest

    The seat is designed to recline. There should be no issue if anyone chooses to recline. If people are expected not to recline, all the seats should be made rigid in the upright position. It would be cheaper to manufacture the simpler seats. Also the already manufactured seats should be disabled from reclining. I would prefer all the seats to recline and have more space. I don't think airlines should have the right to decrease...

    The seat is designed to recline. There should be no issue if anyone chooses to recline. If people are expected not to recline, all the seats should be made rigid in the upright position. It would be cheaper to manufacture the simpler seats. Also the already manufactured seats should be disabled from reclining. I would prefer all the seats to recline and have more space. I don't think airlines should have the right to decrease seat size or legroom. I think there should be minimum standards that are mandatory for people's health, safety and comfort.

  12. Husein Alibhai Guest

    yes, its a right that comes with purchase of seat...bc its on the seat lol. And yes, follow your own etiquette. I def try not to unless its an empty flight or what not (in coach), but that goes out door once someone reclines. No, im not asking them anything. Im going to recline to "normalize". thats the way it goes. I def won't suffer out of "pc" but of course, slow and thoughtful and...

    yes, its a right that comes with purchase of seat...bc its on the seat lol. And yes, follow your own etiquette. I def try not to unless its an empty flight or what not (in coach), but that goes out door once someone reclines. No, im not asking them anything. Im going to recline to "normalize". thats the way it goes. I def won't suffer out of "pc" but of course, slow and thoughtful and thats it. we can't live life, bc I used to so much, caring what others think when ur not doing anything wrong.

    and never happened to me, but if someone asked me to not recline when reclined, and if I wasn't doing it so I didnt suffocate from passenger in front reclining, sure! who cares

    most people dont. maybe road warriors who travel in economy. but honestly --- they're not exactly the leaders of the pack these days with airlines.

    lastly, bc of my disdain of being in steerage with the misbegotten (hehe, jk) sites like this have allowed me to grab loads of business seats at deals and points. bc I do like my space. and I dont travel every weekend so its fine.

    be polite, be courteous, be kind to others, and be kind to yourself...just manners we all should know. no one wants to put another person in a bad position.

  13. BC Guest

    It depends on the person behind you. As a 6’5” person, my knees land above the seat hinge in regular economy, meaning I need to spread out to accommodate a recliner, which then impinges on the people to the side of me or in the aisle. It’s not that I’m being difficult, it’s that my femur doesn’t shrink. I fly SWA mainly and grab exit whenever I can which is about 80% with my status;...

    It depends on the person behind you. As a 6’5” person, my knees land above the seat hinge in regular economy, meaning I need to spread out to accommodate a recliner, which then impinges on the people to the side of me or in the aisle. It’s not that I’m being difficult, it’s that my femur doesn’t shrink. I fly SWA mainly and grab exit whenever I can which is about 80% with my status; on other airlines, I fly economy plus whenever I can, but sometimes I just can’t get a seat with more room. If I get an aggressive recliner, I just ask to switch seats with them, but almost every time in my 20 years of flying, that gets me an indignant “it’s my space.” The key tenant of this article rightly focuses on courtesy first, but it simply isn’t right to recline on someone that’s smashed in behind you. Recline away if there’s space, but you’re an a— if you do it and there is none.

  14. jetjock64 Guest

    At least one court of appeal has weighed in on your right to recline, and it is in the unpublished opinion of Letty vs Northwest Airlines, 864 So. 2nd 413 (Fla. Dist. Ct. App. Dec. 18 2003), where the complainant sued the airline for violation of his right to "his" personal space by the reclined seat in front of him. I decided to contest this ridiculous suit (Northwest was my company's insured) and hired a...

    At least one court of appeal has weighed in on your right to recline, and it is in the unpublished opinion of Letty vs Northwest Airlines, 864 So. 2nd 413 (Fla. Dist. Ct. App. Dec. 18 2003), where the complainant sued the airline for violation of his right to "his" personal space by the reclined seat in front of him. I decided to contest this ridiculous suit (Northwest was my company's insured) and hired a good Florida Aviation defense firm to defend. We won on summary judgment. You can recline.

  15. gideyup11 New Member

    I 100% agree that airlines should reduce the recline (which per Ben’s comment Delta did with their A320s). With airlines reducing seat pitch across the board, it is ridiculous they are maintaining deep(er) recline especially on their domestic fleet. In this case, it IS the airlines who are partly at fault for not proactively doing something about it (i.e. what Delta did with reducing recline).

    I usually don’t recline on domestic flights, but as...

    I 100% agree that airlines should reduce the recline (which per Ben’s comment Delta did with their A320s). With airlines reducing seat pitch across the board, it is ridiculous they are maintaining deep(er) recline especially on their domestic fleet. In this case, it IS the airlines who are partly at fault for not proactively doing something about it (i.e. what Delta did with reducing recline).

    I usually don’t recline on domestic flights, but as with many others, I’ve had many situations where the person in front of me FULLY reclines, and almost knocks my beverage or my device off the tray. The remedies that Ben mentions in this post (while well articulated and reasonable) won’t work with people who are inarticulate and unreasonable (which let’s face it, are many people these days).

    p.s. I fly Spirit sometimes, and I have a growing appreciation for their “pre-reclined” seats. Even with a 28” seat pitch, sometimes it’s more comfortable than UA/DL/AA with 30” seatpitch but a fully reclined seat in front of me!!

  16. Peter B Guest

    I think the seats on all domestic flights should be welded upright... Whenever available I get the 1st class bulkhead seat... And i never recline, it's just rude.

  17. Andy 11235 Guest

    Context matters. I was recently on a transpac where the "passenger" in front of me was a cat (in a carrier. following airline rules, it needed its own seat). Within 5 minutes of take off, the owner reached over and reclined the seat to the max. During meal service, the flight attendants had to ask repeatedly for the passenger to keep the seat upright. Over the next 15 hours, the FAs also had to ask...

    Context matters. I was recently on a transpac where the "passenger" in front of me was a cat (in a carrier. following airline rules, it needed its own seat). Within 5 minutes of take off, the owner reached over and reclined the seat to the max. During meal service, the flight attendants had to ask repeatedly for the passenger to keep the seat upright. Over the next 15 hours, the FAs also had to ask repeatedly that the passenger keep the cat in its carrier for the entire flight. At the risk of getting attacked in the comments, it was notable to me that this passenger acting selfishly without the slightest concern of impact on others was one of the few Americans on the flight. We don't need rules or guides for if you can recline; we need people to balance their own comfort with the comfort of others. Recline when needed; don't just do it because you "paid for the space."

  18. Emily Guest

    When I fly econ, I always select an emergency row seat. Generally, I find reclining to be more uncomfortable since it compromises the lumbar support. Therefore, I don't recline. Since it's an emergency row seat, the person in the row ahead of me cannot recline their seat either. Everyone's happy.

  19. Tom T Guest

    If someone in front of you recline and you don’t, then it’s your fault for having less space.

    The answer is so fricking obvious, EVERYONE reclines and EVERYONE will have same amount of space!!!

    1. Jack M Guest

      The issue with your argument is that some rows can't recline. The rows in front of an exit window and usually the last row at the rear bulkhead can't recline. So you may need to rethink your strategy. Also if someone doesn't want to recline they shouldn't have to because everyone else is.

  20. Ross Guest

    Will never forget a flight from LGW to ANU, BA 747. I was seated next to a priest, the person in front of him reclined 100% on take off, had to be told by crew to return to vertical for meals, reclined immediately after. When the priest asked, very politely, if he could have a bit more space, the person in front exploded in anger and vitriol. The crew defuse the situation, but he was...

    Will never forget a flight from LGW to ANU, BA 747. I was seated next to a priest, the person in front of him reclined 100% on take off, had to be told by crew to return to vertical for meals, reclined immediately after. When the priest asked, very politely, if he could have a bit more space, the person in front exploded in anger and vitriol. The crew defuse the situation, but he was a nasty piece of work.
    On a separate thread, I know of many people who freely admit to using their knees to restrict the recline.

  21. Dannillee Guest

    I recline my seat as soon as the plane leaves the ground. It's my right to recline my seat if I want. I have neck issues and those seats kill my neck and give me headaches as it is so reclining my seat and my neck pillow help alot. I always get a window seat too so opening the window is my right but I usually keep it closed so people can sleep.

    1. Freddy Denentus Guest

      Go buy a first class ticket if it's a medical issue and quit being entitled.
      I'm 6'4" and can't shrink, you can see a doctor for your medical issues.
      Your right infringes on my rights. Don't be so entitled.

    2. Big AL Guest

      YOU go buy a first class seat if you are so awesome that you cant fit in an econ seat

      or maybe you cant afford it.

    3. Jack M Guest

      Sitting next to the window does not give you ownership of the window. By your twisted logic since I sit on the aisle I "own" the aisle and should be able to decide if I want to give you access or not. Seriously think things through and try to be a bit less entitled

    4. Chris Guest

      Sorry jack, but you’re wrong here. If you choose a window seat, it’s your shade. You have the same choice when picking your window. By your logic, you want the aisle AND domain over the window shade which is way more entitled than Big Al’s comment

  22. Thomas Greer Guest

    Recline at YOUR leisure.

    1. Chris Guest

      Sorry jack, but you’re wrong here. If you choose a window seat, it’s your shade. You have the same choice when picking your window. By your logic, you want the aisle AND domain over the window shade which is way more entitled than Big Al’s comment

  23. JimA Guest

    I have back problems, had surgery already, and cannot sit at 90° for more than ~30 minutes. Thus, i will recline; and, i am courteous about it. It is my seat, so i utilize its functions.

  24. Normally First Guest

    As Airlines continue to put recline functions into seats even for short domestic flights they are responsible for the outcomes as they have provided the facility.
    However, reclined seats result in passengers not on the aisle being unable to move without either all the other passengers between them and the aisle, and possibly all the reclined passengers in front of them to make accomodations.
    Also, reclined seatbacks do not accomodate food services, without...

    As Airlines continue to put recline functions into seats even for short domestic flights they are responsible for the outcomes as they have provided the facility.
    However, reclined seats result in passengers not on the aisle being unable to move without either all the other passengers between them and the aisle, and possibly all the reclined passengers in front of them to make accomodations.
    Also, reclined seatbacks do not accomodate food services, without extreme gymnastics on the part of the consumer.
    So perhaps airlines should rethink when the provide reclining seats, for the safety and comfort of all their passengers.

  25. Clayton Guest

    Does the seat have a recline function - YES
    Did I pay for the seat and by extension the things that come with said seat - YES
    Is there an implied right that when purchasing a seat I am also paying for the functions that come with that seat ( tray table, pocket, recline function) - YES
    Am I in anyway responsible for the height of your body or obligated to deny...

    Does the seat have a recline function - YES
    Did I pay for the seat and by extension the things that come with said seat - YES
    Is there an implied right that when purchasing a seat I am also paying for the functions that come with that seat ( tray table, pocket, recline function) - YES
    Am I in anyway responsible for the height of your body or obligated to deny myself comfort because of your height - NO
    Can you recline your own seat in response to me doing so( Including in the vast majority of cases the back row). Thus restoring the equalibrium of the space that existed before I reclined my seat - YES
    Am I in anyway required to seek the approval of a total stranger in using the functions of the seat I paid for - NO

    Yes don't be a d*ck about it, or in general tbh, but it IS your right to use the functions of your seat. It's generally accepted that during meal service you place your seat in the upright position and out of courtesy if I'm in coach then I would turn and ask the person behind if they've finished their meal BUT that is a courtesy not something you're compelled to do in any way save being a decent person.
    I accept the 'just buy a 1st class seat' argument as being slightly unreasonable as there is a financial impact which can at times be sizeable added that what 'you' might not deem as 'sizeable' may not be the case for somebody else. Extra legroom seats however have a much lower cost implication and even taking my point of differing financial situations into account then if it is that much of an issue I would say that you either do that or don't complain because you not doing so if it's that bad removes any self appointed 'right' you feel you have to dictate what I do and don't do. If they're sold out then hey I'm sorry about that but again you have no right to lower/ restrict/ dictate my comfort level to accommodate you.

    Whilst we should all aim to be decent people that stops at the point where someone else feels they have any right to deny you something simply for their own benefit.

  26. Bob Guest

    The seat was built with the ability to recline for a single reason. It's not there as a safety feature or a seat design mistake. Everyone buying their economy seat is aware of this and is not a surprise. If there is an actual problem then airlines should make seats that don't recline at all.

  27. Darren C Diamond

    Next seat topic: Is it okay for those seated behind you to grab and pull your seatback every time they stand up and/or sit down? This happens to me even when I don't recline. My seatback is grabbed constantly throughout the flight, even by some walking to the lav.

    Similarly, I support American Airlines removing seatback entertainment so that passive aggressive pax behind don't continually punch and push the monitors behind my head.

  28. Carrie Member

    All 'rights' come with an obligation to exercise said right with a sense of 'responsibility' which demands the 'common sense' approach ...... although common sense is increasingly an oxymoron and not so common.

  29. Sean Guest

    To the anti-recline crowd: if a seat reclining 2" closer to you is such a problem why don't YOU buy a first class seat to have more room?

  30. dander Guest

    I've almost had a laptop trashed because someone reclined. I now look before I recline

  31. Joe Guest

    You are a shill for the airlines. They are at fault for no pitch abysmal recline. It is a right to use your full allotted cubic space.

  32. Lou Guest

    If the passenger behind me reclines onto the passenger behind them, I recline mine. That's the only time I recline.

  33. pmcsmurf Guest

    I always carry a seat blocker that prevent seats from going back

    1. Steve Guest

      I always “accidentally” spill coffee on people with seat blockers

    2. Billybob Guest

      I accidentally spill food on the people who spill coffee on me. This happens as I have to stand up in aisle to wipe the coffee off.
      Aof course I need to turn to the coffee spiller and tell them I "understand it was an accident.". Of course when wiping the coffee off the food tray I was also holding "accidentally" fall on them.
      Oops..sorry..my bad.

  34. Janet Guest

    I had a 7 hour flight a while ago where a kid in front of me reclined all the way for 7 hours. Very annoying. Me? I never recline more than an inch or two.
    I’m at BOS right now waiting to board a 7 hr flight …at 10:30 p.m.

    1. Dannillee Guest

      Seats only recline about 2 inches! Get over it!

  35. Duck Ling Guest

    As airline crew, dealing with 'seat reclining conflict' is a regularity.

    Fact is, those seats have a recline button for a reason.

    Saying that, I usually take a common sense approach.

    On a daytime flight, when the customers are eating, I will ask anyone with a reclined seat (and eating) to put their seat forward 'just during the meal service so everyone has a little more space'.

    On night flights it's a little more difficult....

    As airline crew, dealing with 'seat reclining conflict' is a regularity.

    Fact is, those seats have a recline button for a reason.

    Saying that, I usually take a common sense approach.

    On a daytime flight, when the customers are eating, I will ask anyone with a reclined seat (and eating) to put their seat forward 'just during the meal service so everyone has a little more space'.

    On night flights it's a little more difficult. Many will forgo the meal service and want to sleep instead. If the person reclining is awake, i'll take the same approach as a day flight. If the person reclined is asleep, I won't wake them and suggest to the eating passenger that they recline their seat a little as well.

    In between meal services - everyone just do what they want with their seats and generally no one is bothered. On longhaul flights it's nearly always during the meal service that the issues arise.

    Obviously, it's a different story on short haul aircraft and flights. Easiest way to resolve the issue - install non reclining seats.

    1. BigTee Guest

      Every European and every female over the age of 21 reclines the seat into my face within 4 seconds of take-off and leaves it there forever. Occasionally at mealtime the FA will repeatedly ask that the seat be upright, which request may or may not be followed. Also half the people are obese and strongly grab the headrest in front of me or my headrest to wrest their excessive mass into or out of a...

      Every European and every female over the age of 21 reclines the seat into my face within 4 seconds of take-off and leaves it there forever. Occasionally at mealtime the FA will repeatedly ask that the seat be upright, which request may or may not be followed. Also half the people are obese and strongly grab the headrest in front of me or my headrest to wrest their excessive mass into or out of a seat.

      It is hopeless..just get another glass of wine and dull your instinctive reflexes to kill the other passenger.

  36. BradStPete New Member

    I have always found this an odd argument. I have been flying as a pax and and F/A since the 1960's. ( I was a child..OK ) This has not EVEN been an issue until fairly recently. On the odd occasion I have a daytime flight in Y class, I don't recline. As a COURTESY (remember that practice ? ) to the person behind me. Evening or night ? just a little. And YES, if...

    I have always found this an odd argument. I have been flying as a pax and and F/A since the 1960's. ( I was a child..OK ) This has not EVEN been an issue until fairly recently. On the odd occasion I have a daytime flight in Y class, I don't recline. As a COURTESY (remember that practice ? ) to the person behind me. Evening or night ? just a little. And YES, if the seat reclines, I did in fact pay for that function, but as a courteous person, trying to be aware of others... I use it rarely. Like it makes so much difference in Y anyway. Thank God for premium Y !

    1. Maryland Guest

      Hey Brad! I remember the olden times also. But back in the day those seats were spaced generously. I can barely look at an economy seat anymore without thinking of the kiddy table at thanksgiving! And I am really short. ;)

  37. GBOAC Diamond

    29 comments and no mention of a solution the airlines for the most part aren't interested in implementing -- a seat with a cushion that slides forward. That way you get to recline somewhat but you give up some amount of leg and foot space. You get to choose the exact combination or recline and legroom that you want without interfering with the person seated ahead or behind you. Interestingly you do find seats like...

    29 comments and no mention of a solution the airlines for the most part aren't interested in implementing -- a seat with a cushion that slides forward. That way you get to recline somewhat but you give up some amount of leg and foot space. You get to choose the exact combination or recline and legroom that you want without interfering with the person seated ahead or behind you. Interestingly you do find seats like this in premium economy on some airlines.
    I have this vague recollection that Delta tried this in the distant pass. Perhaps someone can confirm this and explain why it failed.

    1. monopod Guest

      fixed shell seats are pretty much generally loathed, aren't they?

  38. FlyOften Guest

    Why are we talking about this in 2022?
    We need to talk about why greedy chuckerbrothers have pushed our seats so close together that farting in 11B can be smelt by 18F.

    1. Elite_for_Less New Member

      Whilst I take your point the fact that that is the case is also why your seat costs $100 not $500. The alternative is that your seat has more room but 50% of the people you know now can't afford to get on the plane in the first place. Great for you having that room but a lonely holiday when your friends can't afford to come with you.

    2. Stan Guest

      That would be YOU. The flying public. Most years airlines are tickled pink to make 10-20 bux off of the average ticket. Yet the flying public acts like they are getting ripped off. YOU made seats shrink by shopping with Expedia or cheap tickets and buying whatever ticket was $3 cheaper. Want more room? It's available and for sale. First class.

  39. Herb1946 New Member

    What to do if one (a) has long legs, (b) is willing to pay extra for a seat with more leg room, but (c) is on a plane where the extra leg room seats are offered first to the airline's elites (and, according to travel bloggers, usually all taken by such elites)? My only solution on an ~9000 mile round trip journey was to purchase first class, which was a material financial burden for me--one I can't justify a second time.

    1. Elite_for_Less New Member

      As with all airplane seats, irregardles of cabin or airline, those seats are filled and priced via supply and demand.

      If it is a known issue for you then booking 1,2,3 months out rather than 1,2,3 weeks will increase the chance of securing a seat you feel will be better suited to you and at a lower price point. Whilst I have to guess of course. If your mileage was 9k so likely a...

      As with all airplane seats, irregardles of cabin or airline, those seats are filled and priced via supply and demand.

      If it is a known issue for you then booking 1,2,3 months out rather than 1,2,3 weeks will increase the chance of securing a seat you feel will be better suited to you and at a lower price point. Whilst I have to guess of course. If your mileage was 9k so likely a west coast - UK TATL or to the far east then more often or not that's for a vacation and if you delay/ leave booking a trip that big then, respectfully, I'd say that was a bit on you. AGAIN I will point out I'm guessing here as there's no way for me to know the details without you telling us so I'm making assumptions based on the most statistically likely case.
      I also accept that sometimes an emergency or opportunity will occur which prevents you from planning ahead and in those cases the above won't apply and unfortunately is just part of life.

  40. Steve Guest

    One an overnight intercontinental United flight I once had the situation that the passenger behind me did want me to recline the seat. I went to the flight attended to clarify the situation and she told the passenger behind me that it was my right to recline the seat. That settled the issue.

    1. Big AL Guest

      This should go in a Wiki as a historical event.

  41. Greg Guest

    I am in the boat that economy seats should not have recline. If.there is not at least 36inches of pitch nobody is going to be happy. A red eye in coach - who the heck can sleep even with 2 inches of recline??? You are still quite upright.

    Also sometimes I am sitting in coach not because I can't afford it but because it is sold out or all the freeloader elites have upgraded...

    I am in the boat that economy seats should not have recline. If.there is not at least 36inches of pitch nobody is going to be happy. A red eye in coach - who the heck can sleep even with 2 inches of recline??? You are still quite upright.

    Also sometimes I am sitting in coach not because I can't afford it but because it is sold out or all the freeloader elites have upgraded and I missed my connection and stuck with the leftover coach seats even though I bought a F/J ticket unless I want to wait three days for the only flight with available F/J seats.

    1. Sean Guest

      That 2" of incline is the difference between me falling forward or staying in place when I fall asleep.

    2. Elite_for_Less New Member

      Those "freeloader elites" didn't achieve their status by freeloading. They earnt it buy sustained loyalty and financial support to said airline. Whether that status was achieved out of their own pocket or the corporate check book it happened im response to them spending vast amounts of money and spending considerable amounts of time on the airlines planes.
      They also aren't to blame for you missing a connection or for the lack of F/J seats...

      Those "freeloader elites" didn't achieve their status by freeloading. They earnt it buy sustained loyalty and financial support to said airline. Whether that status was achieved out of their own pocket or the corporate check book it happened im response to them spending vast amounts of money and spending considerable amounts of time on the airlines planes.
      They also aren't to blame for you missing a connection or for the lack of F/J seats in the coming days. Unless you were on a particularly heavy corporate travel route then that lack of cabin availability is unlikely to be due to Stat-Pax pre assignment or at least more likely down to revenue fares. I've boarded a JFK-LAX same-day flight when I had no status and been given a gate upgrade and whilst my British accent can work wonders on American ladies my face is more likely to have me consigned to the hold.

  42. chbartel Guest

    Last month while traveling to Vegas in 1st class, lady behind me and my wife complained I had my seat reclined(I was asleep). My wife just gave her a dirty look and she shut up.

  43. Creditcrunch Diamond

    When I first started flying for business and I was booked into PE or economy in 2005 I was told to buy seat jammers by my predecessors. I was really hesitant but after doing the LHR-IAD route weekly stuck in the back they were very useful. On reflection it was quite selfish both on the passenger in front and the crew who had to deal with the passenger and probably had to report the seat...

    When I first started flying for business and I was booked into PE or economy in 2005 I was told to buy seat jammers by my predecessors. I was really hesitant but after doing the LHR-IAD route weekly stuck in the back they were very useful. On reflection it was quite selfish both on the passenger in front and the crew who had to deal with the passenger and probably had to report the seat as faulty but at the time I was secretly pleased. I am amazed they are still available ( but current out of stock) I still have a pair somewhere.

    https://comfyplane.com/product/airplane-seat-stopper-prevent-recline/

  44. Timo Gold

    I agree it's a right. I just want people to use it judiciously. I have family members who are clueless in general and are not aware of others in public. They are not malicious...at worst, they are just narcissistic.

    My usual observation as a tall 6'1" guy is that the most likely to recline the seat is a 5'4" petite young woman in her 20s. She immediately throws her shoes off and snuggles in...

    I agree it's a right. I just want people to use it judiciously. I have family members who are clueless in general and are not aware of others in public. They are not malicious...at worst, they are just narcissistic.

    My usual observation as a tall 6'1" guy is that the most likely to recline the seat is a 5'4" petite young woman in her 20s. She immediately throws her shoes off and snuggles in that reclined seat. The huge guy next to her usually does not recline.

    Just don't slam back and throw my drink off the tray....please!

    1. Calvin Guest

      Differentials in seat comfort is a just little evening out of the differentials in social privileges accorded to taller folks - men or women.

    2. BigTee Guest

      True that. Petite women of all ages slam back with 4 seconds of airborne and leave it there forever. I am 6 foot 3 and rarely recline.

  45. MildMidwesterner Member

    On long haul flights, recline after the first meal service has ended. Put your seat back up during any subsequent meal services if the person behind you wants to eat.

    1. Christine Guest

      Absolutely agree that at mealtimes everyone should sit up straight. I'm 5'11'' (thanks, Vikings) and I have RA so trying to get out of a seat to go to the loo if the one ahead was reclined, was a nightmare. Sometimes a polite request to pull up was sufficient; other times I had to get crew involved. Now I get a seat with extra leg room or fly business if long haul, but not everyone...

      Absolutely agree that at mealtimes everyone should sit up straight. I'm 5'11'' (thanks, Vikings) and I have RA so trying to get out of a seat to go to the loo if the one ahead was reclined, was a nightmare. Sometimes a polite request to pull up was sufficient; other times I had to get crew involved. Now I get a seat with extra leg room or fly business if long haul, but not everyone can afford that. In my opinion only overnight flights should have reclining seats, if it's a daytime or short flight then sit up ffs. Pretend you are wherever you normally are during the day.

  46. Joe Griffin Guest

    My lord, if the feature is built into the seat and not locked out by the airline, then it's a feature that you are allowed to use. If anyone should be upset it's at the airline!

    If my seat reclines, and I choose to recline, and your behind me and you get upset...your beef is with the airline not me!

    1. Mh Diamond

      So everyone should suffer because you're entitled then.

      Airlines give it to people to improve their comfort rather than making them sit upright. Do you think they need to overlay that with monitors to ensure the usage is not abused/used unnecessarily.

      Your argument is just the same as saying because they allow you to bring your phone onboard you're 'entitled' to run movies in speaker mode disturbing everyone else. Or other ridiculous justifications. It's there...

      So everyone should suffer because you're entitled then.

      Airlines give it to people to improve their comfort rather than making them sit upright. Do you think they need to overlay that with monitors to ensure the usage is not abused/used unnecessarily.

      Your argument is just the same as saying because they allow you to bring your phone onboard you're 'entitled' to run movies in speaker mode disturbing everyone else. Or other ridiculous justifications. It's there to improve your comfort, not that you can use whenever/however you want regardless of others.

    2. Stan Guest

      You AREN'T allowed to watch video on your phone with audio coming from the speakers.

      Just because you can bring your phone doesn't mean there aren't rules.

      So yes, recline is just like your phone, you can use it anytime you like, any way you like, so long as you comply with the rules, ie, seat back up for taxi takeoff and landing.

    3. Mh Diamond

      lol, making up your own rules doesn't win an argument. No such rule about phone use

  47. Julia Guest

    How many times has this article been done? This feels like the fourth or fifth time...

  48. Eve Arnold Guest

    im 6foot tall well over 70 and can only afford economy- i think the recline distance is basis of problem. last flight to Sydney gent in front said nothing flung seat back full recline - hit me on head ; attendant apology but nothing to be done. No issue with necessary recline easing for comfort but it doesn't need to be such a deep recline.

    1. Jan Guest

      I'd like to know which airline has an economy recline so -good- it would smack someone sitting behind on the head.

    2. Darren C Diamond

      If the person in front "hit me on head", you must have been resting your head on the back of their seat. Either that, or hyperbole.

      Even if the seat in front of you reclined 180 degrees, it would hit your knees, not your head. The seat in front is not your headrest.

    3. Matt Guest

      @Jan and @Darren C: Maybe think before you reply? Have you never had the passenger in front of you suddenly recline their seat while you were leaning over to get something out of a carry on bag under the seat? If so, you must not fly very much, or perhaps you're one of those space hogs who puts their small carry ons overhead instead of under the seat in front of you.

    4. Jan Guest

      @Matt You should be more careful next time, and not have your head over ~5” in front of the seat. Your scenario is extremely specific timing. if I’m on premium economy you bet your ass I will use every bit of that 7”-9” recline. It’s all good, just watch your head next time.

    5. Matt Guest

      @Jan, no, maybe the person in front of me should not recline suddenly all the way and continue trying to push it back farther while my head, knees, or notebook computer is in the way.

      I feel sorry for the person who sits behind you and hope that someone more considerate than you is sitting in front of me.

  49. frrp Member

    The person in front does have the right to recline. I also have the right to get out of my seat every 5 mins while theyre trying to sleep which of course will involve their reclined seat being bumped.

    1. Jan Guest

      The fact that you would be open to inconvenience yourself -more- by getting up every few minutes just to "bump" and annoy the recliner in front of you almost warrants some phrase for extreme pettiness.

    2. Mm Guest

      ….bump the recliner every 5 minutes. Hahahaha.
      How MAGA.

    3. AC Guest

      Sounds like a social democrat to me and not a conservative who are typically a lot more tolerant (which the media doesn't present - the most intolerant people in the world are liberals)

  50. Maryland Guest

    Thank you for the way this post was presented. Very thoughtful. A good manners are never a bad thing approach. Sometimes we all have to take one for the team to just get from point A to B without the drama. Now can we address the child kicking the back of my seat?

    1. Elite_for_Less New Member

      Never understood how this one perplexes so many people. There are only 3 steps involved on a progressive basis ie if 1 doesn't work proceed to step 2.
      1. Ask parent to control child.
      2. Ask CC/ FA to talk to parents and or child.
      3. Wait till parents are asleep. Take empty sports bag out of your carry on. Place said child in bag. Zip up and place in overhead bin....

      Never understood how this one perplexes so many people. There are only 3 steps involved on a progressive basis ie if 1 doesn't work proceed to step 2.
      1. Ask parent to control child.
      2. Ask CC/ FA to talk to parents and or child.
      3. Wait till parents are asleep. Take empty sports bag out of your carry on. Place said child in bag. Zip up and place in overhead bin.

      If you do get to three then you can quietly pat yourself on the back as the associated trauma the child experiences means that they are unlikely to kick another seat back ever again so by your actions you've saved countless others the annoyance.

  51. George Romey Guest

    Other than ULCCs seats are made to recline so I don't see the issue. I recline the seat as soon as the a/c leaves the ground.

  52. DaninMCI Guest

    Always a hot issue. I consider it like the seats in your car. You bought the Corolla or the Towncar and got a certain amount of space. You paid for it so you damn well have the right to recline the seats anyway you'd damn well like. Now imagine you have a backseat passenger (maybe even someone you know) in the back seat of your Corolla or Towncar. Do you still recline the seat all...

    Always a hot issue. I consider it like the seats in your car. You bought the Corolla or the Towncar and got a certain amount of space. You paid for it so you damn well have the right to recline the seats anyway you'd damn well like. Now imagine you have a backseat passenger (maybe even someone you know) in the back seat of your Corolla or Towncar. Do you still recline the seat all the way back into their lap the same way you would on a plane? No, you ease it back a bit to be comfortable but you don't slam it down as far as it will go into their knees and give them the finger if they ask you to move it up a bit. It's not a perfect argument but basically the same. You bought that seat and can do what you'd like to other people either way.

  53. BKAloha Guest

    To the anti-recliners: You should refuse to fly an airline that has reclining seats or make sure to write to airlines that have reclining seats and tell them to provide anti-reclining seats. People are gonna recline no matter how many times this issue is debated on the internets.

  54. Lara S. Guest

    It's a part of the seat, so you can use it whenever you want. I agree the caveat being that you should try to do so courteously. Much like when people use the pocket in the seat back in front of them without thinking and now I have something jammed in my back or they repeatedly take things out or put them in or open and close their tray table- all perfectly legit uses of...

    It's a part of the seat, so you can use it whenever you want. I agree the caveat being that you should try to do so courteously. Much like when people use the pocket in the seat back in front of them without thinking and now I have something jammed in my back or they repeatedly take things out or put them in or open and close their tray table- all perfectly legit uses of their space but not courteous. So yeah use the seatback pocket, the tray table, the light, the armrest, the air vent, recline etc to make yourself comfortable, but recognize you are SURROUNDED in a confined space by other people trying to do the same thing.

  55. Donna Diamond

    I do not recline in Economy. Im in the camp that it’s a right to recline. Like others have said, I really hate it if I’m trying to eat a meal and someone is reclined in front of me but I have rarely said anything. What’s worse IMO is people of size, seated next to me, whose mass encroaches into my seat space. Once following a misconnect, I was rebooked in the center seat of...

    I do not recline in Economy. Im in the camp that it’s a right to recline. Like others have said, I really hate it if I’m trying to eat a meal and someone is reclined in front of me but I have rarely said anything. What’s worse IMO is people of size, seated next to me, whose mass encroaches into my seat space. Once following a misconnect, I was rebooked in the center seat of a three across A320. A large couple had reserved the aisle and window seat with the idea that the center seat would go out empty. They had the arm rests up and acted indignant when I asked that they be put down. I rang for the FA and he reseated me, thankfully.

    1. Dannillee Guest

      Your lucky! I had a flight cancel and rebook and ended up between 2 people on a fully booked flight and there was no way the arm rests could go down or for me to sit back in my seat and I have severe neck issues. Not only do I need to recline but I need neck support during flights. I had to go 3 hours without either.

  56. XPL Diamond

    "If you know in advance that economy will be extremely uncomfortable (for example, if you’re really tall), pay extra for a seat with more legroom..."

    Yes. This. I really don't understand folks who willfully choose price over comfort, then complain about the comfort.

    1. Christine Guest

      You're vertically challenged ie short, aren't you? You have a problem with tall people who dare to ask for some consideration wrt reclined seats. Sometimes extra legroom seats aren't available.

  57. ConcordeBoy Diamond

    Many full-service airlines sell recline (of Economy Plus and Premium Economy) as a feature... so you best believe that someone who makes that specific purchase has a "right" to use it.

    Don't want to be reclined on? Buy up, bucko.

    If not, welcome to the suckitude of coach: plenty more to go with that.

  58. Dempseyzdad Gold

    Do you stand inches away from a total stranger "just because you can"? Personal space is very limited in an airplane, and someone who bounces back into your personal space is...unwanted.

    1. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      You don't own (and in this case) did not purchase, said space.

    2. Jan Guest

      You really care about "personal space?" Buy J. Otherwise, suck it up.

    3. Christine Guest

      No need to behave like an Ugly American just because you can.

  59. Jan Guest

    It’s a right, and a feature I paid for. Especially if it’s any economy comfort or premium economy, where increased recline is literally a selling feature. The only thing I am a bit wary about is to be considerate when people are still dining, but otherwise, recline away, folks. I don’t mind it, and neither should you when I recline my seats.

  60. jfhscott Guest

    For the life of me, I cannot understand the people who confidently declare that using a feature which is designed into an airplane seat - at some expense to the airline - is, ipso facto, rude.

  61. Big AL Guest

    the issue is that people are intolerable and now largely have zero respect for others.
    Airlines makes the issue wishy washy so it ends in debacle.

    no recline is the only way forward and mankind loses another nice to have due to its incapacity to not act Neanderthal like.

    1. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      "the issue is that people are intolerable and now largely have zero respect for others."

      WRONG. The issue is that people expect to have (more of) a commodity they didn't pay for.

      Like it or not: space on a mainstream commercial aircraft is exactly that.

    2. Big AL Guest

      Read the comments above and you will understand your ignorance.

      LOVE how it got you triggered though, you're welcome!

    3. ConcordeBoy Diamond

      @Big Al

      Your reading comprehension could use a tune-up, as there's essentially no emotion written into my statement.

      And, not to belabor the point, but if there's any expression of ignorance here, it's on your behalf: as (once again) airlines sell space as a commodity. Whoever pays for that commodity, has the right to use it.

      That you, in your anonymity find that problematic, is solely an issue on your end, and has no bearing on the situation at hand.

    4. Big AL Guest

      Your ignorance is beyond stupid, much like your spelling. Amazing people like you continue to exist.

      You be you though !

    5. Petri Diamond

      I concur with your comment for most part. In my opinion the meal time should be exception to the rule of "right to recline", and consideration for others should prevail. Normally, I fly in F or at least J. Recently, I had to take the "normal" economy flight, no extra legroom seats of any kind were available. The person in front of me reclined his seat after the takeoff. When the meal came I asked...

      I concur with your comment for most part. In my opinion the meal time should be exception to the rule of "right to recline", and consideration for others should prevail. Normally, I fly in F or at least J. Recently, I had to take the "normal" economy flight, no extra legroom seats of any kind were available. The person in front of me reclined his seat after the takeoff. When the meal came I asked politely if he would mind to lift the seatback for the duration of the meal. The request was declined. I am a tall man, it was physically impossible to eat whit my seat upright, and his reclined, unless I had lifted the tray and kept it right under my chin. I passed that meal. Somehow, I still feel that I had actually purchased the space between the traytable and my mouth.

Featured Comments Most helpful comments ( as chosen by the OMAAT community ).

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ConcordeBoy Diamond

You don't own (and in this case) did not purchase, said space.

6
Lara S. Guest

It's a part of the seat, so you can use it whenever you want. I agree the caveat being that you should try to do so courteously. Much like when people use the pocket in the seat back in front of them without thinking and now I have something jammed in my back or they repeatedly take things out or put them in or open and close their tray table- all perfectly legit uses of their space but not courteous. So yeah use the seatback pocket, the tray table, the light, the armrest, the air vent, recline etc to make yourself comfortable, but recognize you are SURROUNDED in a confined space by other people trying to do the same thing.

5
Jan Guest

It’s a right, and a feature I paid for. Especially if it’s any economy comfort or premium economy, where increased recline is literally a selling feature. The only thing I am a bit wary about is to be considerate when people are still dining, but otherwise, recline away, folks. I don’t mind it, and neither should you when I recline my seats.

5
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